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Media Release – January 4, 2022 – Guelph Police – guelphpolice.ca

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Three impaired arrests during weekend

Three people were arrested for impaired driving in Guelph over the weekend, including one who made a three-point turn to avoid a RIDE spot check.

Shortly before 11 p.m. Friday, officers were conducting RIDE checks on Gordon Street near Water Street when a northbound SUV was observed turning around to head south on Gordon Street. One of the officers working the RIDE check followed and pulled the vehicle over.

The driver denied he had been drinking, but had an odour of alcoholic beverage on his breath and was unsteady on his feet. He registered a fail on a roadside screening device and was taken to the police station, where further testing confirmed he had more than the legal amount of alcohol in his system.

A 60-year-old Guelph male is charged with impaired driving and driving without a licence. He was held for bail and later released to appear in a Guelph court January 21, 2022. His driver’s licence was suspended for 90 days and his vehicle was impounded for seven days.

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A few hours earlier, approximately 5:30 p.m. Friday, police had responded to a single-vehicle collision on Hadati Road where a vehicle went off the road and struck a hydro pole. The driver registered a fail on a roadside screening device and was taken to the police station, where further testing confirmed he had more than the legal amount of alcohol in his system.

A 25-year-old Halifax male is charged with impaired operation and careless driving. He will appear in a Guelph court January 18, 2022. His driver’s licence was suspended for 90 days and his vehicle was impounded for 90 days.

On Saturday evening, just before 10 p.m., police were called to a licensed establishment on Woodlawn Road West. The caller advised a male appeared to be intoxicated and was sitting in the driver’s seat of a running motor vehicle. Officers spoke to the male, who had a strong odour of alcoholic beverage on his breath and was showing obvious signs of impairment.

Officers also learned the male was on bail with a condition not to occupy the driver’s seat of a vehicle if he had any alcohol in his system. The male was arrested and taken to the police station, where testing confirmed he had more than the legal amount of alcohol in his system.

A 33-year-old Burlington male is charged with impaired operation and failing to comply with a bail order. He will appear in a Guelph court January 21, 2022. His driver’s licence was suspended for 90 days and his vehicle was impounded for seven days.

Truck speeds through RIDE, just misses officers

The Guelph Police Service is investigating after a pickup truck sped through a New Year’s Eve RIDE check, narrowly missing two officers.

Approximately 10:15 p.m. last Friday, officers were conducting spot checks on Gordon Street just north of Water Street. A red Ford F-150 crew cab pickup entered the lane, but as officers signalled the driver to stop the truck accelerated nearly hitting two officers.

The truck was last seen northbound on Gordon Street crossing over Wellington Street. Officers did not pursue it in the interest of public safety.

It is believed the same truck fled from officers the evening of December 23. Approximately 6 p.m. that day, police were called to a parking lot on Woodlawn Road West after a female called to report she had located her spouse’s pickup which was earlier stolen from Cambridge.

Officers attended and attempted to block in the truck, but the driver went over a curb and sidewalk and exited the parking lot. It was snowing at the time and officers did not pursue the truck in the interest of public safety.

Anyone with information about the incidents is asked to call Detective Sergeant Chris Probst at 519-824-1212, ext. 7342, email him at cprobst@guelphpolice.ca, leave an anonymous message for Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or leave an anonymous tip online at www.csgw.tips.

Male arrested after refusing to wear mask

A Guelph male faces several charges after he refused to wear a mask inside a local business and instead was blowing kisses at employees.

The Guelph Police Service was called approximately 8 p.m. Monday to a business on Silvercreek Parkway North near Willow Road. A male was inside the business, refusing to wear a mask, obstructing staff by blocking their path and blowing kisses. The male was still inside the business when officers arrived.

The male was arrested under the Trespass to Property Act. A search incident to arrest revealed a small amount of suspected methamphetamine in his pocket.

A 35-year-old Guelph male is charged with possessing a controlled substance, breach of probation, failing to leave a premises when directed and failing to comply with the Reopening Ontario Act. He will appear in a Guelph court February 18, 2022.

Several charges following shoplifting

A Guelph male faces several charges following a shoplifting investigation Sunday.

Just before 7 p.m., Guelph Police Service officers were called to a business on Silvercreek Parkway North near Speedvale Avenue West regarding a theft which just occurred. Officers stopped a male matching the description provided and saw he was in possession of the stolen property.

The male provided three variations of a fake name and date of birth before his true identity was determined. A search incident to arrest revealed a baggie containing approximately 6 grams of suspected crack cocaine.

A 24-year-old Guelph male is charged with theft under $5,000, obstructing police, possessing a controlled substance and breach of probation. He will appear in a Guelph bail court Wednesday.

$5k in tools stolen in break-in

The Guelph Police Service is investigating after more than $5,000 worth of tools were stolen during a break-in over the Christmas break.

Approximately 5:45 p.m. Saturday police were called to a residence on Raymond Street. The homeowner reported he was on vacation over the Christmas break and discovered when he got home his garage had been entered.

Tools including drills, a tube expander and an acetylene torch were stolen. The tools were valued at more than $5,100.

The incident remains under investigation. Anyone with information is asked to call Constable Tyler Galea at 519-824-1212, ext. 7285, email him at tgalea@guelphpolice.ca, leave an anonymous message for Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or leave an anonymous tip online at www.csgw.tips.

Charges following three different calls

A Guelph male faces several charges after police dealt with him three separate times on Sunday.

Approximately 7:30 a.m., the Guelph Police Service was called to a business on Woolwich Street near Speedvale Avenue West. Staff reported a male was inside refusing to wear a mask, and was also belligerent with staff and throwing things around. The male provided a false name and was sent on his way at the request of the business’ management.

Approximately four hours later police were called to a disturbance at an apartment building in the same area. Officers learned the male was found sleeping in the building’s stairwell and assaulted a resident by throwing a chair, causing minor injuries. The victim did not wish to pursue charges and the male was again sent on his way.

Officers were still in the area approximately 45 minutes later when another nearby business reported a male inside refusing to wear a mask and being belligerent. The same male was located outside and resisted arrest by trying to flee and pulling away from officers. One of the officers recognized him from the earlier call and had determined the name he provided to be false.

He was arrested and continued to resist, kicking one officer several times in the legs. The officer was not injured. A search of the male revealed two credit cards in another person’s name.

A 29-year-old Guelph male faces several charges including resisting arrest, obstructing police, mischief under $5,000, possessing stolen property and failing to comply with an undertaking. He will appear in a Guelph court February 11, 2022.

Total calls for service in the last 96 hours – 659

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The media’s road to ruin its own credibility in war on Trump – New York Post

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The media’s road to ruin its own credibility in war on Trump  New York Post

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I'm a parent with an active social media brand: Here's what you need to check on your child's social media right now – CNN

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I’m a parent with an active social media brand: Here’s what you need to check on your child’s social media right now  CNN

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Why social media makes you feel bad

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Have you ever found yourself scrolling through social media and noticed you felt a bit down? Maybe a little envious? Why aren’t you on a yacht? Running a startup? Looking amazing 24/7?

The good news is you are not alone. Although social media has some benefits, it can also make us feel a little depressed.

Why does social media make us feel bad?

As humans we inherently compare ourselves to others to determine our self-worth. Psychologists call this social comparison theory.

We primarily make two types of comparisons: upward and downward comparisons.

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Upward comparisons occur when we compare ourselves to someone else (in real life or on social media) and feel they are better than us (an unfavourable comparison for us) in whatever domain we are assessing (such as status, beauty, abilities, success, and so on).

For example, comparing your day at work to your friend’s post from the ski fields (we’re looking at you Dave!) is likely to be an upward comparison. Another example is making appearance comparisons which can make you feel worse about yourself or your looks .

Although upward comparison can sometimes motivate you to do better, this depends on the change being achievable and on your esteem. Research suggests upward comparisons may be particularly damaging if you have low self-esteem.

In contrast, downward comparisons occur when we view ourselves more favourably than the other person – for example, by comparing yourself to someone less fortunate. Downward comparisons make us feel better about ourselves but are rare in social media because people don’t tend to post about the mundane realities of life.

 

Comparisons in social media

Social media showcases the best of people’s lives. It presents a carefully curated version of reality and presents it as fact. Sometimes, as with influencers, this is intentional but often it is unconscious bias. We are just naturally more likely to post when we are happy, on holiday or to share successes – and even then we choose the best version to share.

When we compare ourselves to what we see on social media, we typically make upward comparisons which make us feel worse. We compare ourselves on an average day to others on their best day. In fact, it’s not even their best day. It’s often a perfectly curated, photoshopped, produced, filter-applied moment. It’s not a fair comparison.

That’s not to say social media is all bad. It can help people feel supportedconnected, and get information. So don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Instead, keep your social media use in check with these tips.

 

Concrete ways you can make yourself feel better about social media

Monitor your reactions. If social media is enjoyable, you may not need to change anything – but if it’s making you exhausted, depressed or anxious, or you are losing time to mindless scrolling, it’s time for change.

Avoid comparisons. Remind yourself that comparing your reality with a selected moment on social media is an unrealistic benchmark. This is especially the case with high-profile accounts who are paid to create perfect content.

Be selective. If you must compare, search for downward comparisons (with those who are worse off) or more equal comparisons to help you feel better. This might include unfollowing celebrities, focusing on real posts by friends, or using reality focused platforms like BeReal.

Redefine success. Influencers and celebrities make luxury seem like the norm. Most people don’t live in pristine homes and sip barista-made coffee in white sheets looking perfect. Consider what real success means to you and measure yourself against that instead.

Practise gratitude. Remind yourself of things that are great in your life, and celebrate your accomplishments (big and small!). Create a “happy me” folder of your favourite life moments, pics with friends, and great pictures of yourself, and look at this if you find yourself falling into the comparison trap.

Unplug. If needed, take a break, or cut down. Avoid mindless scrolling by moving tempting apps to the last page of your phone or use in-built focus features on your device. Alternatively, use an app to temporarily block yourself from social media.

Engage in real life. Sometimes social media makes people notice what is missing in their own lives, which can encourage growth. Get out with friends, start a new hobby, embrace life away from the screen.

Get amongst nature. Nature has health and mood benefits that combat screen time.

Be the change. Avoid only sharing the picture-perfect version of your life and share (in a safe setting) your real life. You’d be surprised how this will resonate with others. This will help you and them feel better.

Seek help. If you are feeling depressed or anxious over a period of time, get support. Talk to your friends, family or a GP about how you are feeling. Alternatively contact one of the support lines like LifelineKids Helpline, or 13Yarn.

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