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Posted on Monday July 11, 2022

Burlington, Ont.—July 11, 2022— Burlington’s Heritage Advisory Committee has put together an exciting lineup of activities in honour of Heritage Week, taking place from Aug. 1 to 7, 2022. A variety of in-person and virtual events are planned, with a focus on sharing more about the happenings, issues and sites that have shaped Burlington throughout its history.

Schedule of events
A detailed schedule of all the events taking place during Heritage Week, including locations and how to register, is available at burlington.ca/heritageweek. All events are free, and registration is open between July 11 to 31.

Date

Event

Monday, Aug. 1 at
11 a.m.

Opening Ceremony at Centennial Square. In-person.
No registration required.

Tuesday, Aug. 2 at
6:30 p.m.

Aldershot West Bike Tour. In-person event. Maximum 20
participants. To register, email hb@burlington.ca.

Wednesday, Aug. 3 at 2 p.m.

Burlington Museums virtual lecture. Virtual event.
No registration required. Join the lecture at
museumsofburlington.ca.

Wednesday, Aug. 3 at 6:30 p.m.

Halton Freedom Celebration Virtual Festival. Virtual
event. No registration required. Visit HBHAS.ca.

Thursday, Aug. 4 at
6:30 p.m.

Burlington Public Library presents Between the
Lakes Treaty
. In-person event. Register online at
bpl.on.ca.

Thursday, Aug. 4 at
6 p.m.

Laking Garden Heritage Walk at Royal Botanical
Gardens (RBG)
In-person event. Maximum 20
participants. Registration is required at rbg.ca.

Friday, Aug. 5 at
6:45 p.m.

Burlington Historical Society Walking Tour of
Greenwood Cemetery.
In-person event, maximum
25 participants. Register online at hb@burlington.ca.

Saturday, Aug. 6 at
9 a.m.

Tour of Lowville. In-person event. Register online
at kilbridehistory.com.

Saturday, Aug. 6 at
10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Freeman Station – Garden of Canada. In-person
event.No registration required.

Sunday, Aug. 7 at
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Maple Park Community Garden Drop In. In-person
event. No registration required.

Burlington is a city where people, nature and businesses thrive. Sign up to learn more about Burlington at Burlington.ca/Enews and follow @CityBurlington on social media.


Quick Facts

  • Heritage Week is organized by the members of Heritage Burlington, in collaboration with the Burlington Historical Society, Royal Botanical Gardens, Burlington Public Library, Burlington Museums, United Empire Loyalists’ Association of Canada – Burlington, Freeman Station, Halton Black History Awareness Society, Heritage Services – Halton Region, and David Craig of History Pix.
  • During Burlington Heritage Week, the Burlington Public Library will be holding a photo contest encouraging participants to take a cover shot of their favourite summer read at their favourite place in Burlington for a chance to win a draw prize. The contest is open to Burlington residents under 18. Visit Burlington Public Library’s website starting Aug. 1 for contest submission details – bpl.on.ca.

Quote

Michele Camacho, Chair, Heritage Burlington

“Heritage Burlington is so glad to be able to welcome the community back to in-person events for Heritage Week this year. Burlington’s cultural heritage is so diverse and thanks to our civic partners, community groups, and volunteers, we have a line up of really special events planned. We encourage anyone who is interested in learning more about the history of their community to take part in an activity.”


Links and Resources


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Social media: Do parental controls actually help? – CTV News

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As concerns about social media’s harmful effects on teens continue to rise, platforms from Snapchat to TikTok to Instagram are bolting on new features they say will make their services safer and more age appropriate. But the changes rarely address the elephant in the the room — the algorithms pushing endless content that can drag anyone, not just teens, into harmful rabbit holes.

The tools do offer some help, such as blocking strangers from messaging kids. But they also share some deeper flaws, starting with the fact that teenagers can get around limits if they lie about their age. The platforms also place the burden of enforcement on parents. And they do little or nothing to screen for inappropriate and harmful material served up by algorithms that can affect teens’ mental and physical well-being.

“These platforms know that their algorithms can sometimes be amplifying harmful content, and they’re not taking steps to stop that,” said Irene Ly, privacy counsel at the nonprofit Common Sense Media. The more teens keep scrolling, the more engaged they get — and the more engaged they are, the more profitable they are to the platforms, she said. “I don’t think they have too much incentive to be changing that.”

Take, for instance, Snapchat, which on Tuesday introduced new parental controls in what it calls the “Family Center” — a tool that lets parents see who their teens are messaging, though not the content of the messages themselves. One catch: both parents and their children have to opt into to the service.

Nona Farahnik Yadegar, Snap’s director of platform policy and social impact, likens it to parents wanting to know who their kids are going out with.

If kids are headed out to a friend’s house or are meeting up at the mall, she said, parents will typically ask, “Hey, who are you going to meet up with? How do you know them?” The new tool, she said, aims to give parents “the insight they really want to have in order to have these conversations with their teen while preserving teen privacy and autonomy.”

These conversations, experts agree, are important. In an ideal world, parents would regularly sit down with their kids and have honest talks about social media and the dangers and pitfalls of the online world.

But many kids use a bewildering variety of platforms, all of which are constantly evolving — and that stacks the odds against parents expected to master and monitor the controls on multiple platforms, said Josh Golin, executive director of children’s digital advocacy group Fairplay.

“Far better to require platforms to make their platforms safer by design and default instead of increasing the workload on already overburdened parents,” he said.

The new controls, Golin said, also fail to address a myriad of existing problems with Snapchat. These range from kids misrepresenting their ages to “compulsive use” encouraged by the app’s Snapstreak feature to cyberbullying made easier by the disappearing messages that still serve as Snapchat’s claim to fame.

Farahnik Yadegar said Snapchat has “strong measures” to deter kids from falsely claiming to be over 13. Those caught lying about their age have their account immediately deleted, she said. Teens who are over 13 but pretend to be even older get one chance to correct their age.

Detecting such lies isn’t foolproof, but the platforms have several ways to get at the truth. For instance, if a user’s friends are mostly in their early teens, it’s likely that the user is also a teenager, even if they said they were born in 1968 when they signed up. Companies use artificial intelligence to look for age mismatches. A person’s interests might also reveal their real age. And, Farahnik Yadegar pointed out, parents might also find out their kids were fibbing about their birth date if they try to turn on parental controls but find their teens ineligible.

Child safety and teen mental health are front and center in both Democratic and Republicans critiques of tech companies. States, which have been much more aggressive about regulating technology companies than the federal government, are also turning their attention to the matter. In March, several state attorneys general launched a nationwide investigation into TikTok and its possible harmful effects on young users’ mental health.

TikTok is the most popular social app U.S. teenagers use, according to a new report out Wednesday from the Pew Research Center, which found that 67% say they use the Chinese-owned video sharing platform. The company has said that it focuses on age-appropriate experiences, noting that some features, such as direct messaging, are not available to younger users. It says features such as a screen-time management tool help young people and parents moderate how long children spend on the app and what they see. But critics note such controls are leaky at best.

“It’s really easy for kids to try to get past these these features and just go off on their own,” said Ly of Common Sense Media.

Instagram, which is owned by Facebook parent Meta, is the second most popular app with teens, Pew found, with 62% saying they use it, followed by Snapchat with 59%. Not surprisingly, only 32% of teens reported ever having used Facebook, down from 71% in 2014 and 2015, according to the report.

Last fall, former Facebook employee-turned whistleblower Frances Haugen exposed internal research from the company concluding that the social network’s attention-seeking algorithms contributed to mental health and emotional problems among Instagram-using teens, especially girls. That revelation led to some changes; Meta, for instance, scrapped plans for an Instagram version aimed at kids under 13. The company has also introduced new parental control and teen well-being features, such as nudging teens to take a break if they scroll for too long.

Such solutions, Ly said, are “sort of getting at the problem, but basically going around it and not getting to the root cause of it.”

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Humanity's Biggest Problems Require a Whole New Media Mode – WIRED

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Humanity’s Biggest Problems Require a Whole New Media Mode  WIRED



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Medical Matters Weekly welcomes Director of Institute of Digital Media and Child Development Kris Perry – Vermont Biz

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Vermont Business Magazine Kris Perry is a social worker, a child advocate, the director of the Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, and the next  guest on Medical Matters Weekly at 12 p.m. on Wednesday, August 17.

The show is produced by Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) with cooperation from Catamount Access Television (CAT-TV). Viewers can view on facebook.com/svmedicalcenter and facebook.com/CATTVBennington. The show is also available to view or download as a podcast on svhealthcare.org/medicalmatters.

Perry holds a bachelor’s in sociology and psychology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a master’s in social work from San Francisco State University. She made her career as a child advocate within several organizations starting with the Alameda County Social Services Agency, where she worked in child protective services. She pivoted to leading systems change as executive director of First Five San Mateo and later as executive director of First Five in California and nationally in Washington, D.C. She served as president of Save the Children Action Network.

Perry returned to California to serve as senior advisor to Governor Gavin Newsom and as Deputy Secretary of California Health and Human Services Agency. There she led the development of the California Master Plan for Early Learning and Care and was instrumental in the expansion of access to high-quality early childhood programs. In her current role as director of the Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, she works to fund and disseminate scientific research focused on the impact of digital media on child development and the translation of those findings into programs and policies that promote child wellness.

Medical Matters Weekly features the innovative personalities who drive positive change within health care and related professions. The show addresses all aspects of creating and maintaining a healthy lifestyle for all, including food and nutrition, housing, diversity and inclusion, groundbreaking medical care, exercise, mental health, the environment, research, and government. The show is broadcast on Facebook Live, YouTube, and all podcast platforms.

After the program, the video is available on area public access television stations CAT-TV (Comcast channel 1075) and GNAT-TV’s (Comcast channel 1074), as well as on public access stations throughout the United States.
 
About SVHC:
Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) is a comprehensive, preeminent, healthcare system providing exceptional, convenient, and affordable care to the communities of Bennington and Windham Counties of Vermont, eastern Rensselaer and Washington Counties of New York, and northern Berkshire County in Massachusetts. SVHC includes Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (SVMC), Southwestern Vermont Regional Cancer Center, the Centers for Living and Rehabilitation, and the SVHC Foundation. SVMC includes 25 primary and specialty care practices.

Southwestern Vermont Health Care is among the most lauded small rural health systems in the nation. It is the recipient of the American Hospital Association’s 2020 Rural Hospital Leadership Award. In addition, SVMC ranked fourth nationwide for the value of care it provides by the Lown Institute Hospital Index in 2020 and is a five-time recipient of the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet® recognition for nursing excellence. The health system is fortunate to have the support of platinum-level corporate sponsor Mack, a leading supplier of contract manufacturing services and injection molded plastic parts based in Arlington, VT.

BENNINGTON, VT—August 9, 2022—Southwestern Vermont Medical Center 

 

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