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Meteor shower tonight: Best time to see the Quadrantids meteor shower in the UK tonight – Daily Express

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How to watch the 2021 Quadrantids meteor shower:

Hunting for meteors, like much of astronomy, is a game where patience is a virtue.

As a result, it is best to use a comfortable chair and to wrap up warm, as you should expect to be outside in the cold for a long time.

The 2021 Quadrantids can be viewed with the naked eye, meaning there is no need for expensive binoculars or telescopes.

However, astronomers stress you will need to allow your eyes to adjust to the dark.

The Royal Observatory Greenwich said in a statement: “For the best conditions, you want to find a safe location away from street lights and other sources of light pollution.

“The meteors can be seen in all parts of the sky, so it’s good to be in a wide open space where you can scan the night sky with your eyes.”

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NASA cuts short ground test of its giant moon rocket – Al Jazeera English

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The test is a vital step in NASA’s Artemis programme to put the first woman and the next man on the Moon in 2024.

NASA ignited all four engines of a deep space exploration rocket – the Space Launch System (SLS) – for the first time on Saturday, but the “hot fire” test ended much earlier than expected.

Mounted in a test facility at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, the SLS’s 212-foot (65-metre) tall core stage roared to life at 4:27pm local time (22:27 GMT) for just more than a minute – well short of the roughly four minutes engineers needed to stay on track for the mega rocket’s first launch in November this year.

During the live broadcast of the test, NASA did not explain the reason for the early shutdown, but Wayne Hale, a former manager of NASA’s space shuttle programme, suggested a “major component failure”.

The fiery show, the last leg of NASA’s nearly year-long “Green Run” test campaign, was a vital step for the space agency and its top SLS contractor, Boeing, before the rocket’s debut launch in November.

The success of that unmanned mission, called “Artemis 1”, will set the stage for the first landing on the Moon by humans since the Apollo 17 mission in 1972. US President Donald Trump has pushed for that trip – which will also see the first woman on the Moon – to happen by 2024.

It was unclear whether Boeing and NASA would have to repeat Saturday’s test, a prospect that could push the debut launch into 2022.

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine, speaking at a news conference after the test, said the agency “got lots of data that we’re going to be able to sort through” to determine if a do-over is needed.

NASA’s SLS program manager John Honeycutt cautioned the data review from the test is continuing and told reporters the turnaround time for another hot fire test could be roughly one month.

The expendable super heavy-lift SLS is three years behind schedule and nearly $3bn over budget.

Critics have long argued for NASA to retire the rocket’s shuttle-era core technologies, which have launch costs of $1bn or more per mission, in favour of newer commercial alternatives that promise lower costs.

By comparison, it costs as little as $90m to fly the massive, but less powerful, Falcon Heavy rocket designed and manufactured by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, and some $350m per launch for United Launch Alliance’s legacy Delta IV Heavy.

While newer, more reusable rockets from both companies – SpaceX’s Starship and United Launch Alliance’s Vulcan – promise heavier lift capacity than the Falcon Heavy or Delta IV Heavy, potentially at a lower cost, SLS backers have argued it would take two or more launches on those rockets to launch what the SLS could carry in a single mission.

Reuters reported in October that President-elect Joe Biden’s space advisers aimed to delay Trump’s 2024 goal, casting fresh doubts on the long-term fate of SLS just as SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin scramble to bring rival new heavy-lift capacity to market.

NASA and Boeing engineers have stayed on a 10-month schedule for the Green Run “despite having significant adversity this year,” Boeing’s SLS manager John Shannon told reporters this week, citing five tropical storms and a hurricane that hit Stennis, as well as a three-month closure after some engineers tested positive for the coronavirus in March.

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Watch NASA's historic Moon mission rocket test at 5PM ET – Yahoo Canada Shine On

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Eat This, Not That!

Here’s How to Get Your COVID Vaccine in Your State

The coronavirus vaccine is now available, the “light at the end of the tunnel” of this deadly pandemic. But confusion about who is eligible, how to get yours, and where to go seems to be changing every day. “The vaccine rollout in the United States has been a dismal failure so far,” President-elect Joe Biden said Friday. “The honest truth is this, things will get worse before they get better. And the policy changes we are going to be making, they’re going to take time to show up in the COVID statistics.” In the following story, you’ll find links to every state’s vaccination rollouts, so you can find the latest information. Read on—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus. 1 Alabama If you live in Alabama, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 2 Alaska If you currently live in Alaska, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 3 Arizona If you reside in Arizona, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 4 Arkansas If you live in Arkansas, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 5 California If you reside in California, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 6 Colorado If you currently live in Colorado, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 7 Connecticut If you live in Connecticut, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 8 Delaware If you live in Delaware, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 9 Florida If you currently reside in Florida, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 10 Georgia If you’re located in Georgia, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 11 Hawaii If you live in Hawaii, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 12 Idaho If you’re located in Idaho, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 13 Illinois If you reside in Illinois, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 14 Indiana If you live in Indiana, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 15 Iowa If you take up residence Iowa, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 16 Kansas If you live in Kansas, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 17 Kentucky If you live in Kentucky, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 18 Louisiana If you take up residence in Louisiana, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 19 Maine If you live in Maine, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 20 Maryland If you’re located in Maryland, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 21 Massachusetts If you live in Massachusetts, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 22 Michigan If you’re located in Michigan, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 23 Minnesota If you reside in Minnesota, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 24 Mississippi If you live in Mississippi, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 25 Missouri If you take up residence in Missouri, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 26 Montana If you live in Montana, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 27 Nebraska If you reside in Nebraska, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 28 Nevada If you live in Nevada, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 29 New Hampshire If you live in New Hampshire, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 30 New Jersey If you live in New Jersey, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. RELATED: 7 Tips You Must Follow to Avoid COVID, Say Doctors 31 New Mexico If you reside in New Mexico, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 32 New York If you live in New York, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 33 North Carolina If you live in North Carolina, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 34 North Dakota If you live in North Dakota, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 35 Ohio If you live in Ohio, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 36 Oklahoma If you live in Oklahoma, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 37 Oregon If you’re located in Oregon, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 38 Pennsylvania If you live in Pennsylvania, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 39 Rhode Island If you’re located in Rhode Island, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 40 South Carolina If you live in South Carolina, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. RELATED: Dr. Fauci Just Said When We’d Be Back to “Normal” 41 South Dakota If you take up residence in South Dakota, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 42 Tennessee If you live in Tennessee, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 43 Texas If you live in Texas, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 44 Utah If you live in Utah, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 45 Vermont If you take up residence in Vermont, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 46 Virginia If you reside in Virginia, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 47 Washington If you live in Washington, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 48 West Virginia If you live in West Virginia, you can find out how to get the vaccine by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 49 Wisconsin If you live in Wisconsin, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 50 Wyoming If you live in Wyoming, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 51 Washington DC If you currently live in Washington DC, you can find out how to get vaccinated by going to the state’s vaccine website, here. 52 How to Survive This Pandemic As for yourself, follow the public health fundamentals and help end this surge, no matter where you live—wear a face mask, social distance, avoid large crowds, don’t go indoors with people you’re not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don’t visit any of these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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NASA is about to finally test fire its future Moon rocket – The Verge

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Four huge rocket engines will roar to life on Saturday, in a crucial test for NASA’s powerful next-generation rocket. This long-awaited trial run won’t leave the ground, but it will be so powerful that officials have warned that it may be heard up to 60 miles away.

Saturday’s test is the last step in series of tests that NASA calls a Green Run for the Space Launch System (SLS), a powerful rocket designed to launch missions to the Moon and deep space. It will test the 212 foot tall core of the SLS, which consists of four engines, liquid fuel tanks, and the computer and technical systems that NASA calls the “brains” of the rocket.

The rocket was originally intended to debut in 2017, but it has consistently been over budget and behind schedule. Now, NASA will finally have a chance to see how the rocket’s systems work while the four engines are firing ahead of the SLS’ first launch later this year. Engineers and technicians have already tested the core’s backup systems, run through dress rehearsals to double check-timing, and loaded and unloaded hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel ahead of the big event. Now they just need to put it all together for the first time to really mimic a launch.

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“To be able to run a test like this, it takes not only a village, but small city,” said Ryan McKibben, the Green Run test conductor at Stennis Space Center, in a press conference. It will take six barges to haul more than 700,000 gallons of super cold propellent needed for this test — roughly 200,000 gallons of liquid oxygen, and 500,000 gallons of liquid hydrogen.

The four engines themselves were originally built for NASA’s Space Shuttle program, which ended in 2011. They’ve been updated with upgrades including new engine controllers to get them ready to become part of the SLS. When the engines are fired, they will produce 1.6 million pounds of thrust — more than enough to send the core soaring. “When we ignite the engines, the stage actually will think it is flying. That’s what it’s built to do,” McKibbin said.

While the core of the SLS is built to fly, the massive test stand is designed to keep it firmly grounded. The huge structure is anchored into the ground with over 144 feet of concrete and steel that will absorb and redirect the thrust from the engines, McKibbin said. The engines will burn for about eight minutes — approximately the same amount of time that it will take to launch the rocket to the Moon on future missions.

This is the last big rehearsal for the rocket before it heads to space, which means it’s also one of the last chances for NASA to get data on how the rocket might perform. The team plans to run the engines through the same thrust changes that they will eventually endure when they fly through the Earth’s atmosphere. The core stage is packed with over 1,400 sensors to help document all aspects of the test and gather data that NASA will analyze intensely over the next several days after the test.

“The reason we test is to uncover issues on the ground and not in space,” said Julie Bassler, SLS stages manager, at a NASA press conference this week. “We are doing everything we can to ensure that we get the most out of this hot fire test and we are ready to launch.”

If the test is successful, the core stage will be inspected and shipped to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida, where it will be joined to other parts of the rocket and the Orion crew capsule. Sometime after that, the SLS will make its launch debut on the uncrewed mission called Artemis 1. That mission doesn’t have a firm date yet, but NASA is aiming for that launch to happen in November 2021.

Even as the SLS heads for space, it’s worth noting that it is not the only deep space rocket on the horizon. SpaceX is rapidly prototyping its Starship system in Texas, and the Starship design is being considered as a candidate lunar lander for future NASA missions.

The window for the SLS hot fire test opens at 5:00PM ET, and coverage on NASA TV will start at 4:20PM ET. NASA’s livestream coverage can be found on YouTube and on the agency’s website.

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