Connect with us

Science

Meteor shower with hundreds of shooting stars will be visible falling over Earth tonight, NASA reports – indy100

Published

on


Now is a better time than ever to wish upon a shooting star, so be sure to make your way outside in the early hours of 6 May for some stargazing.

The Eta Aquarids meteor shower — which occurs from late April to mid-May — is expected to peak in the UK this week between midnight tomorrow and Wednesday, and in the US during the early hours of tomorrowNN.

“The Eta Aquarids are pieces of debris from Halley’s Comet, which is a well-known comet that is viewable from Earth approximately every 76 years,” NASA said.

“Also known as 1P/Halley, this comet was last viewable from Earth in 1986 and won’t be visible again until the middle of 2061.”

Meteors occur from leftover comet particles and bits from broken asteroids. When comets come around the sun, they leave a dusty trail behind them, according to NASA’s website.

Rates of the meteor this year can reach up to 40 meteors per hour during that time, in theory, according to Bill Cooke, who leads NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office. The shower is of medium brightness, and the darker your skies the more you’ll see, Cooke told Space.com.

The best way to see the meteors, according to Cooke, is to lie flat on your back and look straight up. That way, you get the widest view of the sky, and you won’t have to strain your neck.

It is also best to use your naked eye to spot a meteor shower, according to the New York Times. “Binoculars or telescopes tend to limit your field of view. You might need to spend about half an hour in the dark to let your eyes get used to the reduced light.”

With the coronavirus lockdown still in place, it may be difficult for some to go to an area with little light pollution. Still, head outside and try for a socially-distanced stargaze.

More About

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

SpaceX launches 60 more Starlink satellites and achieves a reusability record for a Falcon 9 booster – TechCrunch

Published

on


SpaceX launched its second Falcon 9 rocket in the span of just four days on Wednesday at 9:25 PM EDT (6:25 PM PDT). This one was carrying 60 more satellites for its Starlink constellation, which will bring the total currently in operation on orbit to 480. The launch took off from Florida, where SpaceX launched astronauts for the first time ever on Saturday for the final demonstration mission of its Crew Dragon to fulfill the requirements of NASA’s Commercial Crew human-rating process.

Today’s launch didn’t include any human passengers, but it did fly that next big batch of Starlink broadband internet satellites, as mentioned. Those will join the other Starlink satellites in low Earth orbit, forming part of a network that will eventually serve to provide high-bandwidth, reliable internet connectivity, particularly in underserved areas where terrestrial networks either aren’t present or don’t offer high-speed connections.

This launch included a test of a new system that SpaceX designed in order to hopefully improve an issue its satellites have had with nighttime visibility from Earth. The test Starlink satellite, one of the 60, has a visor system installed that it can deploy post-launch in order to block the sun from reflecting off of its communication antenna surfaces. If it works as designed, it should greatly reduce sunlight reflected off of the satellite back to Earth, and SpaceX will then look to make it a standard part of its Starlink satellite design going forward.

Part of this launch included landing the first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket used for the launch, which has already flown previously four times and been recovered – that makes this a rocket that has now flown five missions, and today it touched down safely once again on SpaceX’s drone landing barge in the ocean so it can potentially be used again.

SpaceX will also be attempting to recover the two fairing halves that form the protective nose cone used during launch at the top of the rocket to protect the payload being carried by the Falcon 9. We’ll provide an update about how that attempt goes once SpaceX provides details.

Tomorrow, June 4, actually marks the 10-year anniversary of the first flight of a Falcon 9 rocket – between this reusability record, and the much more historic first human spaceflight mission earlier this week, that’s quite the decade.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

SpaceX Set To Launch Eighth Starlink Mission, Read The Instructions With East Coast Droneship Debut – NASASpaceflight.com

Published

on


SpaceX Set To Launch Eighth Starlink Mission, Read The Instructions With East Coast Droneship Debut – NASASpaceFlight.com

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

Brandon University researchers examine dinosaur’s last meal in historic study – Globalnews.ca

Published

on


A team from Brandon University have become the first researchers in the world to study the actual stomach contents of a dinosaur, more than 100 million years after it ate its last meal.

And apparently the nodosaur dug up in northern Alberta was a bit of a picky eater.


READ MORE:
Rare dinosaur stomach fossil unearthed at Alberta oilsands site opens door to ancient world

The researchers, including Brandon University biology professor Dr. David Greenwood, research associate Cathy Greenwood, and BU science student Jessica Kalyniuk, say that pretty well all they found in the dinosaur’s belly were leaves from one particular fern plant.

“The vast majority of what we found in its stomach was fern leaves, along with a few stems and twigs,” said Greenwood in a release from the university.

Story continues below advertisement


An illustration of an nodosaur by artist Julius Csotonyi.


Brandon University/Royal Tyrrell Museum

“We also found charcoal in the stomach indicating that it was grazing in a freshly burned area, where ferns are some of the first plants that emerge, giving us insight into the way the nodosaur lived.”

The 1,300-kilogram dinosaur was found at an open pit mine north of Fort McMurray, Alta. in 2011 and has been on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alta. since 2017.


READ MORE:
A pair of exhibits bring dinosaurs back to Winnipeg

The nodosaur, a type of ankylosaur, lived more than 110 million years ago, and is thought to be the most well-preserved specimen of the creature ever found.

“The discovery of a specimen like this is absolutely remarkable, and the preservation of the plant fragments is evidence that it died shortly after its last meal,” said Greenwood.

Story continues below advertisement

Findings published

The team, which included researchers from the museum as well as a geologist from the University of Saskatchewan, determined the dinosaur had a preference for particular ferns — and really, who doesn’t? — after researching other plants found in the area at the time.

Their findings were published by the Royal Society Open Science this week.

Kayyniuk, who graduated with a bachelor of science from BU in 2019 and is now working on her master’s degree, says she didn’t know just how rare an opportunity it was be able to see the fossilized stomach contents of a dinosaur before starting the work.

Fossilized plants in the stomach block of the nodosaur.


Fossilized plants in the stomach block of the nodosaur.


Brandon University/Royal Tyrrell Museum

She spent 10 days doing research at the museum on the project, and plans on doing further research this year, if COVID-19 travel restrictions are lifted.

Story continues below advertisement

“The more I learned, the more interesting it became to me and the more aware and in awe I was that this is truly unique research,” she said in the university’s release.


READ MORE:
Do you recognize this dinosaur? Manitoba Museum takes unique approach to lost-and-found

“This has given me an opportunity to get experience at the museum, including hands-on and remote access to their collections, which will play a large role in my thesis work.

“It has also provided me with new colleagues, resources and support that are of great benefit to me, and I’m sure will continue to be in the future.”






1:06
Argentine scientists discover one of the last dinosaurs


Argentine scientists discover one of the last dinosaurs

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending