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Michael Jordan And 'The Last Dance' Was A Social Media Phenomenon – Forbes

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TOPLINE

Over the last five weeks, the ESPN documentary “The Last Dance” has dominated social media each night it has aired, and Sunday’s finale was certainly no exception, as there were more than 1 million tweets about the final episode and 20 of the 30 trending topics on Twitter were related to the documentary. 

KEY FACTS

“The Last Dance,” the 10-part documentary series about Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls’ quest to win a sixth NBA championship in eight years, was enormously popular right from the very start, as it averaged 6.1 million viewers for episodes 1 and 2 across ESPN and ESPN2 back on April 19th.

The premiere episodes rank as the two most-viewed original content broadcasts on ESPN Networks since 2004 and ranked as the most-watched telecast among adults 18-34 and 18-49 since sports halted across broadcast and cable networks.

During those first two episodes, it was the #1 trending topic on Twitter and was also the top Google Search Trend in the U.S.

On Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, “Last Dance” posts from ESPN accounted for a combined 9 million engagements. Two pre- and two post-digital live shows combined for 3.5 million viewers and 2.6 million minutes.

Over the next month, the show continued to rack up remarkably impressive viewership numbers week after week, averaging 5.6 million viewers across premieres of its first eight episodes.

Those significant audiences across four separate Sundays is 57% more viewers than the next-closest documentary debut on ESPN (“You Don’t Know Bo” in 2012).

Through the ten-episode series, the five most mentioned people on twitter were 1) Michael Jordan, 2) LeBron James, 3) Kobe Bryant, 4) Dennis Rodman, and 5) Scottie Pippen

Critical quote:

“As society navigates this time without live sports, viewers are still looking to the sports world to escape and enjoy a collective experience,” ESPN said in a statement announcing the expedited release of the series back in early April. “This project celebrates one of the greatest players and dynasties ever, and we hope it can serve as a unifying entertainment experience to fill the role that sports often play in our lives, telling a story that will captivate everyone, not just sports fans.”

Chief Critic:

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, famed documentarian Ken Burns stated that he had not watched the series because of Michael Jordan’s involvement in the production of the series. Jordan’s production company, Jump 23, is listed as a partner on the series. Burns said he would “never, never, never, never” agree to a partnership like that and added, “If you are there influencing the very fact of it getting made, it means that certain aspects that you don’t necessarily want in aren’t going to be in, period. And that’s not the way you do good journalism.”

Key Background:

The documentary had been initially scheduled to debut in June, but with the dearth of sports programming resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, ESPN execs shrewdly pushed up the timeline. Since sports halted in mid-March, ESPN has aired the 10 most-viewed sports telecasts, with all eight episode premieres of “The Last Dance” ranking among them as of last Monday. The ratings for episodes 9 and 10 are expected to be released later this afternoon, and may be the largest yet. In addition, the audience for the documentary will continue to grow significantly with video on demand, DVR viewing and encore presentations. All episodes have been released on Netflix

NFLX
internationally the day after their U.S. airings.

Further Reading:

“The Last Dance” Series Premiere Episodes are the Most-Viewed ESPN Documentary Content Ever (ESPN)

“The Last Dance” Premieres Continue To Inspire Significant Audiences (ESPN)

Ken Burns Slams Michael Jordan Doc’ Last Dance:’ ‘Not the Way You Do Good Journalism’ (Variety) 

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Trump sued over executive order targeting social media companies – BNNBloomberg.ca

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President Donald Trump’s order targeting social media companies was challenged in court by a non-profit group that claims the edict violates free-speech protections guaranteed by the First Amendment.

Trump’s order, issued on Thursday, might undermine the legal protections enjoyed by social media companies including Twitter and Facebook. He asked federal regulators to look at provisions, contained in Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act, that insulate the companies from liability for content posted by users.

The order followed on the heels of Twitter’s decision to add fact-check labels to two of Trump’s tweets. Twitter also restricted a post by the president suggesting that protesters who engaged in looting would be met with violence. Legal observers have said Trump lacks the power to modify Section 230 by executive order.

The Center for Democracy and Technology sued in Washington federal court Tuesday, claiming the order is an unconstitutional retaliation against Twitter and that it seeks to discourage other companies and individuals from disagreeing with the government.

The case is Center for Democracy and Technology v. Trump, 20-cv-01456, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington).

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Tech-rights group sues Trump to stop social-media order – CTV News

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NEW YORK —
A tech-focused civil liberties group on Tuesday sued to block U.S. President Donald Trump’s executive order that seeks to regulate social media, saying it violates the First Amendment and chills speech.

Trump’s order, signed last week, could allow more lawsuits against internet companies like Twitter and Facebook for what their users post, tweet and stream.

The order was more political than substantive, with many experts questioning whether it was constitutional. The president aimed to rally his supporters after Twitter put fact checks on two of his tweets. Trump, without evidence, has long accused tech companies of being biased against conservatives.

The order targets current law — you may have heard recent references to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act — that protects internet companies from lawsuits. They can’t be sued for hosting videos and posts from users, or for moderating their services, with some exceptions.

In its suit, the Center for Democracy and Technology said that Trump’s executive order violates the First Amendment because it attacks Twitter for putting the fact checks on the president’s tweets, which CDT said is Twitter’s right as a private company. More broadly, the order is trying to curb speech of all online platforms and people “by demonstrating the willingness to use government authority to retaliate against those who criticize the government,” CDT said.

“The government cannot and should not force online intermediaries into moderating speech according to the president’s whims,” said Alexandra Givens, CDT’s CEO, in an emailed statement. The organization filed the federal suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

There was pushback against Trump’s order from various sources. Tech industry groups, unsurprisingly, said it was bad for innovation and speech. Civil rights and libertarian organizations and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce also criticized Trump’s order.

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The Media Kitchen wins Pillway, launches first campaign – Media In Canada

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The Media Kitchen wins Pillway, launches first campaign

A primarily digital campaign will target older adults and caregivers as the online pharmacy looks to grow its base.

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A primarily digital campaign will target older adults and caregivers as the online pharmacy looks to grow its base.

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