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Mobile COVID-19 testing to begin in Truro in wake of potential exposures

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A mobile health unit will be set up in Truro , N.S., on Thursday in response to an increase in the number of potential exposures in the area in the last week.

Drop-in testing will be available at the NSCC Truro Campus from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. AT, according to a press release from Nova Scotia Health late Wednesday evening.

The testing is for anyone with no symptoms who is not a close contact of a person with COVID-19 and is not self-isolating because of travel outside of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, or Newfoundland and Labrador.

Seven new potential exposure locations were announced in the Truro area on Tuesday, and another on Wednesday. A full list of exposures in the province can be found here.

8 new cases on Wednesday

Nova Scotia reported eight new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday.

Three of the cases are in northern zone and are close contacts of previously reported cases.

 

A student at Cape Breton University has tested positive for COVID-19, according to the university president. (Norma Jean MacPhee/CBC)

 

Two of the cases are in eastern zone and are related to travel outside of Atlantic Canada. The people are self-isolating, as required. One of the cases is a student at Cape Breton University who lives off-campus. The other case is a student at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish who lives off-campus.

Three of the cases are in the central zone and are related to travel outside of Atlantic Canada. The people are self-isolating, as required. One of the cases is a student at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax who lives on campus.

Asymptomatic testing ID’d CBU case

CBU’s president, David Dingwall, said the student went for asymptomatic testing after arriving in Cape Breton on Jan. 5.

Dingwall said the individual has been isolating off-campus and following mandatory public health requirements.

“It is proven that this testing can help identify cases before symptoms ever arise, allowing us to better protect each other,” Dingwall wrote in a post on the university’s website.

“As a community, we must continue to watch out for each other and keep each other safe.”

Public health officials are carrying out contact tracing, Dingwall said, and people who are considered to be close contacts of the student have been notified.

CBU said no further details will be released to respect the student’s privacy.

Total of 8 cases at N.S. universities

A total of eight cases of have now been identified at Nova Scotia universities so far this month.

The province is urging students who have returned from outside of Nova Scotia., Newfoundland or P.E.I. to book a COVID-19 test on the sixth, seventh or eighth day of their quarantine, regardless of whether they have symptoms.

Any students experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 must complete a self-assessment online or call 811. Students still must complete their 14-day isolation period even with a negative test result.

The province has reported that 3,831 doses of vaccine have been administered in Nova Scotia. CBC News is tracking vaccine administration across Canada.

Mandatory testing of rotational workers

On Tuesday, the province announced mandatory testing for rotational workers will come into effect Friday. They’ll be required to get a test within two days of returning to Nova Scotia and again about a week later.

If rotational workers do not get tested, they will be fined $1,000. Regardless of the test result, they must still complete their 14-day modified self-isolation.

Atlantic Canada case numbers

  • New Brunswick reported 19 new cases on Wednesday and 230 active cases. The province also reported two deaths on Tuesday and another on Wednesday, bringing the total to 12 since the start of the pandemic. Every zone of the province has been rolled back to orange-phase restrictions to deal with the growing number of cases.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador reported no new cases on Monday. There were five active cases in the province, with one person in hospital.
  • P.E.I. reported one new case on Tuesday — the person travelled outside of Atlantic Canada and is self-isolating. There were eight active cases on the island.
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Source: – CBC.ca

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How Canada's 742531 COVID-19 cases break down by province | News – Daily Hive

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Canada has seen 742,531 COVID-19 cases since the pandemic began nearly a year ago in March 2020. Of that total, 64,573 cases are currently active.

As of January 24, Ontario has seen the highest cumulative COVID-19 case count of any province or territory.

Based on data from the federal government, the province has recorded 252,585 virus cases to date.

Quebec has the second-highest case count, with 252,176 reported as of January 24. Alberta follows, with 120,330 total cases.

Ontario COVID-19 cases

Government of Canada

British Columbia has confirmed 63,484 coronavirus cases to date, while Manitoba has seen 28,476 cases, and Saskatchewan has recorded 21,917.

Other parts of the country have seen far fewer cases throughout the pandemic, with some provinces and territories yet to reach 1,000 cumulative cases.

Nova Scotia has reported 1,570 COVID-19 cases since March 2020, and New Brunswick has confirmed 1,104. Newfoundland and Labrador has seen 398 cases as of January 24.

There have been 267 coronavirus cases in Nunavut and 110 in Prince Edward Island. Yukon has reported 70 virus cases to date, and the Northwest Territories has seen 31.

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COVID-19 in Ottawa: Ontario reports nearly 100 cases Sunday – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
COVID-19 trends in Ottawa continue to show improvement following a lower case count on Sunday.

Ottawa Public Health reported 76 more people in the city have tested positive for COVID-19, a lower figure than the 92 new cases reported on Saturday. 

The number of active cases continues to fall, as does the weekly per capita rate.

OPH also reported no new deaths in Ottawa for the first time since Jan. 16. There were 17 COVID-19 related deaths reported in Ottawa from Jan. 17 to Jan. 23. 

In all, 419 residents of Ottawa have died since the start of the pandemic.

Ontario health officials are reporting 99 new cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, but the gap between the two health authorities is closing.

Figures from OPH and the province often differ due to different data collection times.

OPH’s COVID-19 dashboard is reporting a total of 12,929 cases of COVID-19 in the city since the pandemic began. The province’s latest update brings its total to 12,928. 

There were 2,417 new cases of COVID-19 reported across Ontario on Sunday. Public Health Ontario also added 50 new deaths provincewide and 2,759 new resolved cases on Sunday.

Since Jan. 16, active cases of COVID-19 have fallen by 27 per cent, the weekly rate of cases per 100,000 residents is down by about 30 per cent and the test positivity rate fell to below 4 per cent. 

OTTAWA’S COVID-19 KEY STATISTICS

A province-wide lockdown went into effect on Dec. 26, 2020. Ottawa Public Health moved Ottawa into its red zone in early January.

A provincial stay-at-home order has been in effect since Jan. 14, 2021.

Ottawa Public Health data:

  • COVID-19 cases per 100,000 (previous seven days): 61.2 cases
  • Positivity rate in Ottawa: 3.2 per cent (Jan. 15 – Jan. 21)
  • Reproduction number: 0.91 (seven day average)

Reproduction values greater than 1 indicate the virus is spreading and each case infects more than one contact. If it is less than 1, it means spread is slowing. 

VACCINES

As of Jan. 22, 2021

  • Doses administered in Ottawa (first and second shots): 22,981
  • Doses received in Ottawa: 25,350

ACTIVE CASES OF COVID-19 IN OTTAWA

Ottawa Public Health says there are 939 people with known active cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa right now, down from 988 in Saturday’s update. 

The number of active cases peaked at a record 1,286 on Jan. 16.

OPH added 125 new resolved cases to its count, bringing the total number of resolved cases to 11,571.

The number of active cases is the number of total laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 minus the numbers of resolved cases and deaths. A case is considered resolved 14 days after known symptom onset or positive test result.

HOSPITALIZATIONS IN OTTAWA

Ottawa Public Health is reporting 37 people in Ottawa hospitals with COVID-19 complications, one more than on Saturday.

There are six people in intensive care.

Of the people in hospital, one is between 10 and 19 years old, one is in their 40s, eight are in their 50s (one is in the ICU), seven are in their 60s (four are in the ICU), four are in their 70s (one is in the ICU), 10 are in their 80s, and six are 90 or older.

COVID-19 TESTING

Ontario health officials say 48,947 COVID-19 tests were completed across Ontario on Saturday and 23,995 tests remain under investigation. 

The Ottawa COVID-19 Testing Taskforce does not provide local testing updates on weekends. In its most recent report on Friday, it said labs performed 6,832 on Jan. 21.

The next update from the taskforce will be released Monday afternoon.

COVID-19 CASES BY AGE CATEGORY

  • 0-9 years old: Eight new cases (923 total cases)
  • 10-19 years-old: Eight new cases (1,622 total cases)
  • 20-29 years-old: 14 new cases (2,756 total cases)
  • 30-39 years-old: 10 new cases (1,790 total cases)
  • 40-49 years-old: Six new cases (1,680 total cases)
  • 50-59 years-old: Seven new cases (1,539 total cases)
  • 60-69-years-old: Five new cases (943 total cases)
  • 70-79 years-old: Nine new cases (585 total cases)
  • 80-89 years-old: Three new cases (653 total cases)
  • 90+ years old: Six new cases (435 total cases)
  • The ages of three people with COVID-19 are unknown.

COVID-19 CASES ACROSS THE REGION

  • Eastern Ontario Health Unit: 15 new cases
  • Hastings Prince Edward Public Health: Zero new cases
  • Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Public Health: Five new cases
  • Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit: Two new cases
  • Renfrew County and District Health Unit: Zero new cases
  • Outaouais region: 23 new cases

INSTITUTIONAL OUTBREAKS

Ottawa Public Health is reporting COVID-19 outbreaks at 41 institutions in Ottawa, including long-term care homes, retirement homes, daycares, hospitals and schools.

There are eight active community outbreaks. Two are linked to office workplaces, one is linked to a construction workplace, one is linked to a health workplace, one is linked to a manufacturing/industrial workplace, one is linked to a services workplace, one is linked to a restaurant, and one is linked to a warehouse.

The schools and childcare spaces currently experiencing outbreaks are:

  1. Andrew Fleck Children’s Services – Home Child Care – 29101
  2. Greenboro Children’s Centre
  3. Little Acorn Early Learning Centre
  4. Montessori by Brightpath
  5. Ruddy Family Y Child Care
  6. Services à l’enfance Grandir Ensemble – La Maisonée – 28627
  7. Wee Watch Nepean – Home Child Care – 29084

The long-term care homes, retirement homes, hospitals, and other spaces currently experiencing outbreaks are:

  1. Besserer Place
  2. Centre D’Accueil Champlain
  3. Colonel By Retirement Home
  4. Elisabeth Bruyere Residence
  5. Extendicare Laurier Manor
  6. Extendicare Medex
  7. Extendicare New Orchard Lodge
  8. Extendicare West End Villa
  9. Forest Hill 
  10. Garden Terrace
  11. Garry J. Armstrong long-term care home
  12. Grace Manor Long-term Care Home
  13. Group Home – 28608
  14. Group Home – 29045
  15. Group Home – 29049
  16. Group Home – 29052
  17. Madonna Care Community
  18. Montfort Long-term Care Centre
  19. Oakpark Retirement Community
  20. Park Place
  21. Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre
  22. Peter D. Clark long-term care home
  23. Richmond Care Home 
  24. Rockcliffe Retirement Residence
  25. Shelter – 28778
  26. Shelter – 29413 
  27. Sisters of Charity – Couvent Mont St. Joseph
  28. St. Patrick’s Home
  29. Stirling Park Retirement Community
  30. Supported Independent Living – 29100
  31. The Ravines Independent Living
  32. Valley Stream Retirement Residence
  33. Villa Marconi
  34. Villagia in the Glebe

A single laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 in a resident or staff member of a long-term care home, retirement home or shelter triggers an outbreak response, according to Ottawa Public Health. In childcare settings, a single confirmed, symptomatic case in a staff member, home daycare provider, or child triggers an outbreak.

Under provincial guidelines, a COVID-19 outbreak in a school is defined as two or more lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in students and/or staff in a school with an epidemiological link, within a 14-day period, where at least one case could have reasonably acquired their infection in the school (including transportation and before or after school care).  

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Male teen who worked at Ontario long-term care home has died of COVID-19, health unit says – CBC.ca

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A male teenager who worked at an Ontario long-term care home has died of COVID-19, the Middlesex-London public health unit said Saturday.

Dan Flaherty, spokesperson for the Middlesex-London Health Unit, said one of the three deaths it reported on its website Saturday is a staff person. The other two people who died, a man in his 60s and a woman in her 80s, were also associated with long-term care homes.

The teen is the youngest person in the region to have died of COVID-19. The teen’s age and workplace have not been released.

“We are not able to provide any other information including the individual’s exact age or the facility where they worked, as this could risk identifying them,” Flaherty said in an email.

Dr. Alex Summers, associate medical officer of health for the Middlesex-London Health Unit, told CBC News Network’s Natasha Fatah that the young man was recently diagnosed with COVID-19 and was a staff member at a long-term care home.

The diagnosis came within the last four weeks and his infectious period had actually ended, Summers said. An investigation is underway into the death, he said.

Summers called it a “tragic young death” in the region. “It’s certainly a very sad day and a reminder of how the impact of this pandemic can be felt,” he said.

“This is the youngest person who had been diagnosed with COVID who has died since the beginning of the pandemic for us in our region.”

‘It’s a tragic day,’ health official says

Summers could not say if the young man had underlying health conditions. The investigation is looking into that, he added. 

Summers previously said the teen was not working at a long-term care home while infectious, but the health unit now says the teen did work at the home for a short period of time, early on in the infectious period, before going into isolation.

He said the health unit believes some members of his immediate household may end up testing positive for the virus.

“COVID-19 transmits very readily among households,” he said.

Summers said the anticipated spread to his family is “just another reminder of how infectious this disease certainly can be.” Members of the health unit have spoken to the young man’s family, he said.

“It’s a tragic day,” he said. “I think there is a sense of sorrow among us today.”

In an email to CBC Toronto, Ontario’s long term care ministry confirmed the death of a long-term care home worker but provided no other details.

“We extend our deepest condolences to their family, friends and colleagues,” Rob McMahon, spokesperson for the ministry, said in an email on Saturday.

“Due to sensitivities and requirements for protection of privacy for Ontarians, and for protecting Ontarians’ confidential personal and health information, we cannot comment on individual cases,” McMahon added.

“We are grateful for the hard work and dedication of all long-term care staff working under challenging conditions to care for our most vulnerable during the pandemic.”

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