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Montreal Canadiens' NHL playoffs run provides boost for Rogers Sports & Media – BradfordToday

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TORONTO — While Montreal Canadiens fans are stoked to see their team’s first Stanley Cup final series since 1993, it could be just as exciting for Rogers Sports and Media.

Rogers paid about $5.2 billion for the Canadian media rights to National Hockey League games in a 12-year deal that runs through the 2025-26 season.

But the media landscape has changed since Rogers signed the landmark deal in November 2013, with a growing portion of audience coming from streaming services.

“We’re certainly seeing a migration of spending away from traditional media to digital media,” marketing professor Ken Wong said Monday.

“Not to say that there isn’t a role for traditional (media). There still is. But clearly that the trend line is moving in a digital direction,” said Wong, who teaches at Queen’s University’s business school in Kingston, Ont. 

With the puck set to drop on Game 1 of the Cup final on Monday, Wong said digital media can provide a level of detail about the audience that’s not possible with older forms of mass media.

“I can actually carry on more personalized, customized discussions with my customers using digital media than I ever could using traditional media,” Wong said. 

But Wong couldn’t say how much advertisers are willing to pay for this feature, because different platforms appeal to different demographics.

“It depends on what you’re selling, to whom you’re selling, and what the prevailing attitudes are of the day,” Wong said.

David Mear, director of business solutions for Horizon Media Canada, agreed that digital media are making inroads, but he still puts more weight on television’s ability to deliver results for advertisers.

“We tend to still focus a bit more on television,” Mear said from Toronto, where Horizon’s major clients include Tim Hortons, Burger King and Peloton. 

He said it is significantly more expensive to run a 30-second advertising spot on TV because it has a larger audience compared with on a streaming service. 

Mear said he wasn’t permitted to say what his clients pay for ad time and Rogers declined to disclose its rates.

Anthony Attard, vice-president of sales for Sportsnet, part of Rogers Sports and Media, said advertisers have shown strong interest with this year’s Stanley Cup playoffs — which began with four Canadian teams battling each other in the first two rounds.

“And now with a Canadian team in the final, it’s clear marketers want to use these broadcasts as a way to connect with Canadians,” Attard said in a statement.

“In addition, we are only now seeing the return of a lot of traditional advertisers that were impacted more adversely through COVID.”

Mear said that clients have been very interested this year in the playoffs, which have had a unique format because of the pandemic. 

“The audiences have been doing tremendously well. There’s obviously a lot of pent up support for the Canadian teams, especially with the fact that there was a Canadian team guaranteed to be in the third round,” Mears said.

The presence of Montreal in the final is also good news for audience engagement, he said.

Sportsnet said Monday that the semifinal series between the Habs and Vegas Golden Knights reached 13.8 million people in Canada over six games through Rogers Sportsnet and CBC television.

The company says Game 6, which Montreal won 3-2 in overtime on Thursday, had an estimated audience of 3.7 million people on average during the broadcast.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 28, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:RCI.B)

David Paddon, The Canadian Press

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said there were eight Canadian teams in the first two rounds.

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Social media companies targeted in potential online harms bill, but legislation still a ways off – The Globe and Mail

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The federal government has launched a new consultation that it says will lead to combatting online hate shared on social media sites – a move that has prompted advocates to say real change isn’t coming fast enough.

The government is asking the public to respond to a proposal that includes creating a new Digital Safety Commissioner of Canada, as well as a Digital Recourse Council that Canadians can petition in order to have content removed from social media sites. The Recourse Council would have the power to make binding decisions to make sites remove content, though the consequences for not abiding by that ruling are not yet clear.

The plans, announced Thursday, focus on five categories of online harms: terrorist content, hate speech, content that incites violence, child sexual exploitation and the non-consensual sharing of images.

As government hosts antisemitism summit, opposition leaders say they should have been invited to speak

The government says it wants to bring in legislation on online hate, aimed at social media companies that play a role in sharing content. It would be in addition to Bill C-36, which targeted public hate speech by individuals. Bill C-36 did not pass into law after being introduced by the Liberal government at the end of the parliamentary session. If an election is called this summer, as is widely expected, the legislation will no longer move forward.

Despite a campaign being anticipated soon, Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault said the new online harms bill would be introduced as a top priority “very early on when the House resumes its work in the fall.”

“We’re hearing loud and clear from Canadians that something needs to be done about online hate,” Mr. Guilbeault said in an interview.

“What we’re presenting is what we feel is the best course forward, but we want to hear Canadians on that, and that’s what we’ll be doing in the coming weeks.”

The government has posted details of its proposed approach on the Canadian Heritage section of its website and is asking the public to provide feedback by e-mail. The potential legislation would apply to sites such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, but would exclude private communication channels such as WhatsApp and telecommunications networks.

Bernie Farber, chair of the Canadian Anti-Hate Network, said creating online hate legislation would be a positive move. However, he said that at the moment it’s only “a plan to make a plan.”

“It should not have taken this long and it should not be taking any longer,” he said. “My fear is that an election is going to get called and this just gets swept away into partisan politics and people forget about it.”

Mr. Farber also raised the issue of how the process of dealing with online hate still heavily relies on victims self-reporting to have content removed, and said he’d like to see more of the onus fall on a new commissioner instead.

Daniel Bernhard, executive director of the advocacy group Friends of Canadian Broadcasting, said in a statement that platforms such as Facebook and YouTube must be held responsible for their role in promoting illegal content on their sites. “Legislation aimed at tackling online harm must send a clear message to these firms and their leaders: if you allow illegal content to circulate on your platform, you will pay a price,” the statement reads.

Rob Moore, Conservative Shadow Minister for Justice and the Attorney General of Canada, said in an e-mailed statement Thursday that his party is “deeply concerned with the Liberal’s plan to create an online speech regulator whose powers are overly broad and ill-defined.”

Know what is happening in the halls of power with the day’s top political headlines and commentary as selected by Globe editors (subscribers only). Sign up today.

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Social Reset promotes healthy social media usage – Belleville Intelligencer

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In a world dominated by online algorithms, Social Reset is working to free people from social media and help them develop a healthier relationship with the internet.

Its campaign begins in August. Those participating will team up by pledging to reduce their social media usage for the entire month. One of Social Reset’s founders, Jordan Wiener, hopes this smartphone-less time facilitates meaningful connections with loved ones.

“The idea is that you get more time connecting with each other offline,” he said. “(Social Reset) is really not about, you know, raising money or doing any of this. It’s about putting down your phone, going outside and making memories with your friends and family.”

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Wiener is one of several Queen’s University alumni behind Social Reset; its current 10 volunteers and 14 ambassadors are primarily composed of former and current students. A shared desire to act in the face of complacency unites them.

“(Social Reset) started out of a frustration between the awareness of the social media problem and the action,” Wiener said. “I’d speak to friends for an hour, but I’d follow up with them a month later, and no one had done anything about it.”

He blames the design of social media apps for this dissonance.

“Everyone knows that this is a problem, but it’s something that’s really hard to do something about because these platforms can be so addictive.”

Social Reset is how Wiener and colleagues are fighting for change. In partnering with Jack.org and the Centre for Humane Technology, they’ve created an initiative to help participants re-evaluate their relationship with social media.

Pledging can be done individually or as a group. Social Reset’s website offers different pathways for people pledging alone, with a group of friends, or with family. All pledges will receive a weekly “Adventure Guide” containing ideas for smartphone-free activities.

While Wiener lives happily without any social media, he recognizes how platforms such as Instagram and TikTok can often become creative outlets. He believes that intention is central in developing a healthy relationship with them.

“So instead of compulsively checking your phone and going on and watching things that you don’t know why you’re watching, you (should) say, ‘I’m using social media for this’ and then use it strictly for that purpose,” Wiener explained.

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He warned that without intention, social media ends up using its users.

“(Otherwise) they’ve got you addicted to the algorithm, and they’re profiting off of you for each second that you spend on the platform,” he said.

The Social Reset team has also been teaching purposeful social media usage in classrooms through an educational workshop. It has interactive programming for all ages, but children in grades 7 and 8 have been their primary focus.

“We’re youth presenting this workshop to other youth,” Wiener said. “We explain how social media can be an awesome thing but also challenging. Then we leave the class to come up with their own ‘creative contract’ of rules that they’re going to impose and try for a week.”

These rules chosen by the children can be anything from not using phones before bed to dedicating more screen-free time to family.

“A week after they’ve done that, we come back in with them, and for 45 minutes everyone just kind of shares their experiences,” Wiener said.

Through its August campaign and educational workshops, Social Reset is working hard to improve our relationship with social media.

Those interested in pledging can find more information at thesocialreset.org.

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Social Reset promotes healthy social media usage – The Kingston Whig-Standard

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Article content

In a world dominated by online algorithms, Social Reset is working to free people from social media and help them develop a healthier relationship with the internet.

Its campaign begins in August. Those participating will team up by pledging to reduce their social media usage for the entire month. One of Social Reset’s founders, Jordan Wiener, hopes this smartphone-less time facilitates meaningful connections with loved ones.

“The idea is that you get more time connecting with each other offline,” he said. “(Social Reset) is really not about, you know, raising money or doing any of this. It’s about putting down your phone, going outside and making memories with your friends and family.”

Advertisement

Article content

Wiener is one of several Queen’s University alumni behind Social Reset; its current 10 volunteers and 14 ambassadors are primarily composed of former and current students. A shared desire to act in the face of complacency unites them.

“(Social Reset) started out of a frustration between the awareness of the social media problem and the action,” Wiener said. “I’d speak to friends for an hour, but I’d follow up with them a month later, and no one had done anything about it.”

He blames the design of social media apps for this dissonance.

“Everyone knows that this is a problem, but it’s something that’s really hard to do something about because these platforms can be so addictive.”

Social Reset is how Wiener and colleagues are fighting for change. In partnering with Jack.org and the Centre for Humane Technology, they’ve created an initiative to help participants re-evaluate their relationship with social media.

Pledging can be done individually or as a group. Social Reset’s website offers different pathways for people pledging alone, with a group of friends, or with family. All pledges will receive a weekly “Adventure Guide” containing ideas for smartphone-free activities.

While Wiener lives happily without any social media, he recognizes how platforms such as Instagram and TikTok can often become creative outlets. He believes that intention is central in developing a healthy relationship with them.

“So instead of compulsively checking your phone and going on and watching things that you don’t know why you’re watching, you (should) say, ‘I’m using social media for this’ and then use it strictly for that purpose,” Wiener explained.

Advertisement

Article content

He warned that without intention, social media ends up using its users.

“(Otherwise) they’ve got you addicted to the algorithm, and they’re profiting off of you for each second that you spend on the platform,” he said.

The Social Reset team has also been teaching purposeful social media usage in classrooms through an educational workshop. It has interactive programming for all ages, but children in grades 7 and 8 have been their primary focus.

“We’re youth presenting this workshop to other youth,” Wiener said. “We explain how social media can be an awesome thing but also challenging. Then we leave the class to come up with their own ‘creative contract’ of rules that they’re going to impose and try for a week.”

These rules chosen by the children can be anything from not using phones before bed to dedicating more screen-free time to family.

“A week after they’ve done that, we come back in with them, and for 45 minutes everyone just kind of shares their experiences,” Wiener said.

Through its August campaign and educational workshops, Social Reset is working hard to improve our relationship with social media.

Those interested in pledging can find more information at thesocialreset.org.

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