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More Capitol rioters in viral posts arrested; senator urges social media providers to keep data connected to riot – The Globe and Mail

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In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo supporters of President Donald Trump are confronted by U.S. Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber inside the Capitol in Washington. An Arizona man seen in photos and video of the mob wearing a fur hat with horns was also charged Saturday in Wednesday’s chaos. Jacob Anthony Chansley, who also goes by the name Jake Angeli, was taken into custody Saturday, Jan. 9.

Manuel Balce Ceneta/The Associated Press

Federal agents arrested two more Capitol Hill rioters whose images had gone viral, of one carrying off the House Speaker’s lectern and another who wore horns and a fur pelt, while a top Democratic lawmaker called on mobile carriers to preserve social media content related to the carnage.

Dozens of people have been charged following the storming of the Capitol on Wednesday, with the FBI asking the public to help identify participants, given the proliferation of images of the riots on the internet. Five people have died, including a police officer.

Jacob Anthony Chansley, who featured prominently on social media wearing horns, a fur pelt, face paint and brandishing a spear adorned with the U.S. flag, turned himself in to police, the Department of Justice said.

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Chansley, also known as Jake Angeli, called the FBI’s Washington office on Thursday and voluntarily spoke to law enforcement, the DOJ said.

“Chansley said that he came as part of a group effort with other ‘patriots’ from Arizona, at the request of the President that all ‘patriots’ come to D.C. on January 6, 2021,” the DOJ said in a release.

Federal agents also arrested Adam Christian Johnson, whose photo as he smiled and waved as he carried off House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s lectern had also gone viral. Johnson, of Parrish, Florida, also streamed live video on Facebook of himself as he walked the halls of the Capitol, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

The video has been removed from online platforms and all his pages have been taken down.

On Saturday U.S. Senator Mark Warner, a Democrat who is the incoming Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, urged mobile carriers to preserve content and associated meta-data connected to the riot, which erupted as lawmakers gathered to certify the election of President-elect Joe Biden.

He sent letters to AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Apple, Facebook, Gab, Google, Parler, Signal, Telegram and Twitter.

Warner, in his letters to the companies, emphasized how the rioters took time to document the event and post them via social media and text messages “to celebrate their disdain for our democratic process.”

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Before his arrest, NBC network reported, Chansley gloated about how the crowd infiltrated the Capitol, forcing lawmakers to flee.

“The fact that we had a bunch of traitors in office, hunkered down, put on gas masks and retreat to their underground bunker, I consider that a win,” he said to NBC News.

Chansley faces several federal charges including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Media reports said he had often been seen at rallies supporting President Donald Trump. Efforts by Reuters on Saturday to reach his relatives were unsuccessful, as were attempts to contact Johnson’s family.

The Miami Herald reported that on Johnson’s social media pages, which have been taken down, he boasted of being in Washington ahead of the riots.

It was unclear where Chansley was being held Saturday, or whether he or Johnson had legal representation.

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Johnson, who has a first appearance in federal court on Monday, is being charged out of Washington.

There were at least 13 people facing criminal charges in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in connection to the riot, and at least another 40 people faced lesser charges in the District of Columbia Superior Court, a local venue.

Many of them were arraigned on Thursday and released, with an order from the judge to not return to Washington unless for court appearances or meetings with their attorneys.

They included Richard Barnett, the Gravette, Arkansas, man who was photographed sitting at Pelosi’s desk.

Among those arrested Friday for participating in the riot was West Virginia House of Delegates member Derrick Evans, who announced his resignation on Saturday.

The FBI and Washington’s police department are jointly investigating the death of Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, who was injured while defending the Capitol. Flags at the Capitol were lowered to half-staff on Friday in his honour.

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Capitol Police have said the Washington police’s homicide unit was investigating the death.

“Just because you’ve left the D.C. region, you can still expect a knock on the door if we find out you were part of the criminal activity at the Capitol,” Steven D’antuono, the FBI Washington Field Office’s assistant director in charge, said on Friday.

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Sens Sickos: A look at the Sens fans movement on social media – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
You may have seen a new term trending on social media about the Ottawa Senators called “Sens Sickos.”

It’s an unlikely rallying cry; born not from the Sens’ success, but from their struggles.

Thanks to an unlikely fan, the movement now has a theme song.

James Mellish is a Sens super-fan.  While many locals have embraced the hometown team, Mellish is unique because he lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

“The Senators jersey just really caught my eye. I had nothing else to go on other than aesthetics,” says Mellish.

Mellish became a fan 15 years ago, while playing the “NHL 2004” video game at a sleepover when he was 12.

“I fell in love with hockey that very night,” said Mellish.

When he purchased the game, Mellish said, “And then I was like, I wonder if this team is any good in real life – and yes they were at that time, very much so; and, I’ve been them following them even more closely ever since.”

He’s now more than just a member of the Sens fan base; he created a theme song to the growing social media movement “Sens Sickos.”

“It ended up getting played in the arena, during a game that I fortunately was able to hurry home and be able to watch it live,” said Mellish.

He watched that game with his girlfriend, “and, we were just screaming on the couch when we realized it was me on the speakers.”

The “Sens Sickos” started when fans were hoping for a loss to increase Ottawa’s chances at the first overall pick in the NHL draft lottery last year.

Chris is a Sens fan, who goes by the Twitter handle @brochenski. He modified a political cartoon, and it grew from there.

“It was originally a meme made by the Onion,” Chris tells CTV News Ottawa.

He added a Senators hat and foam finger on the character, and says it then took off.

“It just kind of flows well, and it just fits the overall vibe of how Sens feel,” says Chris, “Sens fans feel kind of beaten down by the last few years.”

“That’s what we’ve come to in Ottawa; we’re at the stage now where the Sens have been losing games on the ice for so long that fans have found a way to amuse themselves,” says TSN 1200’s John Rodenburg.

Rodenburg thinks fans are ready to see the team not just win, but get back to the rink,

“Fans are just so thirsty to one day find a winning team, a team they can cheer on, be back in the rink at some point, experience what it’s like to be a fan again,” said Rodenburg, morning host on TSN 1200.  “But in the meantime, it’s like, what can I do to make this entire experience as fun as I possibly can.”

Mellish is looking forward to visiting Ottawa again and meeting other fans in person once the pandemic is over.   He’s visited Ottawa once, about 11 years ago.

“Definitely excited to do that.”

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Penguins admit they edited masks onto fans for social media post – CBS Sports

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have admitted that someone in their social media department altered a photo to make it look like everyone in it was wearing their mask correctly for a social media post. The team said in a statement to the New York Post that the staffer responsible for the edit has been disciplined.

The post itself, which is still up as of this writing, was made for the return of fans to the team’s arena for the first time since fans were barred from games as part of the league’s COVID-19 prevention policy. It included a quote from the Penguins’ coach about appreciation for the team’s supporters. The original image, however, included three people who didn’t have their masks over their nose and mouth, as DK Pittsburgh Sports reporter Taylor Haase noted.

A group of 2,800 fans was allowed into PPG Paints Arena on Tuesday for the first time since March 8, 2020. This came in response to a ruling from Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, who permitted gatherings up to 15 percent capacity at indoor venues. The Penguins marked the moment with a 5-2 win. 

As for the edit itself, the Penguins said that while the staffer was “perhaps well-intended” the move was against the organization’s policy. The team also made sure to note that the edits were only made on “a few fans” not following the rules.

“Our social media team should never send out altered photos to our fan base,” the statement continued. “This is a violation of our social media and safety policy, and this staffer has been disciplined.”

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Media group disputes Facebook Canada official's suggestion that exiting news markets an 'appropriate' option – Financial Post

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‘I am not sure why they would want to repeat what they did in Australia,’ News Media Canada President Johm Hinds said

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As Canadian legislation looms to level the playing field between news publishers and big tech platforms, the two sides continue to be divided over what value each brings to the other — even as multi-million-dollar agreements are forged to pay for news content in Europe and Australia. 

On Friday, an association representing publishers across the country took issue with statements made by Facebook Canada’s head of policy in an interview with The Logic, including a suggestion that the presence of news on the social media platform provides a value to publishers equivalent to several hundreds of millions of dollars. 

John Hinds, president of News Media Canada, disputed that figure, and pointed to a report published by his association last year that estimated the value of news content on the platforms at more than $600 million, an amount he said “far outstrips any benefit that publishers derive from the platforms.” 

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During the interview with The Logic, Facebook’s Chan suggested the News Media Canada report last year dealt primarily with the business model — and impact — of other online platforms, not Facebook’s.

Hinds, however, said his view is bolstered by a flurry of multi-million-dollar dollar deals Alphabet Inc.’s Google struck with publishers in Australia last month as the country put the final touches on a mandatory bargaining code governing the relationship between traditional publishers and the tech platforms. 

Google signed multi-year deals with three of Australia’s largest media companies, including Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., which are reportedly worth tens of millions of dollars to the publishers. 

  1. Facebook said this week it would raise its funding of news publishers to US$1 billion over three years.

    Facebook exploring potential news licensing agreements in Canada: source

  2. Facebook blocked all Australian news content on its service over proposed legislation requiring it and Google to pay fees to Australian publishers for news links.

    Canada vows to be next country to go after Facebook to pay for news

According to Google, each publisher’s deal is different, depending on what they bring to the table, and some of the compensation will come in the form of services “in kind” rather than cash for the publishers. 

Both Google and Facebook objected to Australia’s code, and pushed to be able to negotiate commercial licensing agreements with the publishers of their choice to feed specific news products, rather than being forced to pay for simply carrying news links or snippets. But the spectre of the mandatory code has been credited with pushing forward arrangements that were acceptable to both sides. 

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One of the most visible objections to the legislation was Facebook’s decision to pull Australian news from its platform for several days last month in protest of that country’s mandatory bargaining code. However, just days before the code became law with some minor amendments, Facebook struck its first commercial licensing deal with Australia’s Seven West Media. 

In the interview with the Logic, Chan said such an approach could still be “appropriate” depending on the situation.

“At the end of the day, if it doesn’t work for the platform because the regulation is not workable for them, then exiting the news market is an appropriate response,” he said.

News Media’s Hinds said he was surprised Facebook still views exiting a news market as a viable option.

“I am not sure why they would want to repeat what they did in Australia,” Hinds said.

Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault speaks to media in Ottawa.
Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault. Photo by Blair Gable/Reuters files

Canada’s heritage minister Steven Guilbeault has pledged to introduce legislation in Canada by June to level the playing field between digital platforms and traditional media players and support the domestic news industry. That plan has won favour with News Media Canada, which said Canadian news publishers and the heritage minister agree legislation is needed “to ensure there are fair negotiations” under a code of conduct. 

“We saw Facebook make threats but finally agree to compensate news publishers in Australia,” the statement said. “That behaviour shows it does not want to pay willingly and will only come to the negotiating table when legislation is passed.” 

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The online platforms have pointed out that publishers willingly share their stories and should simply remove them if they are unhappy they aren’t being compensated. But News Media Canada countered that an “unbalanced power structure” between publishers and the platforms has developed over time. After initially enticing publishers to display their wares, Facebook has now become “such a powerful platform that news publishers have no choice but to use it,” the organization said in Friday’s statement. 

Officials at Facebook declined to comment on the News Media Canada statement. 

Guilbeault has said Canada is studying both the Australian bargaining code and a European response based on copyright. It is understood there will be further consultations with publishers, the tech platforms, and other affected parties and experts before legislation is introduced.

In-depth reporting on the innovation economy from The Logic, brought to you in partnership with the Financial Post.

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