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More than half of Canadians think 2019 was a bad year for Canada: Ipsos poll – Global News

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According to a new poll, more than half of Canadians think 2019 was a generally bad year for Canada.

The poll, which was conducted by Ipsos, captured the predictions and outlooks of Canadians, as well as those in 32 other countries, on topics ranging from climate change to the economy.


READ MORE:
Canadians feel better about money, worse about romance: Ipsos year-end poll

Among the results, 75 per cent of Canadians expect an increase in global temperatures in 2020 while over six in 10 Canadians said they believe gender wage equality won’t be reached this year.

Polling results from Ipsos’ predictions for 2020 report.

Polling results from Ipsos’ predictions for 2020 report.


Global News

Jennifer McLeod, Ipsos vice president of public affairs, said a majority of Canadians are actually still feeling positive for this year — despite their view of 2019 as well as the negative predictions they’ve made for 2020.

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“You know, while some things that Canadians are worried about have met these negative predictions … I do think that on the whole, they are feeling positive,” said McLeod.

The poll also found that about three-quarters of Canadians feel that 2020 will be better overall year than 2019, as well as about four in 10 feel that the global economy will be better.

“Though Canada isn’t quite as optimistic about this as some other countries, you know that’s still not a bad number — we’re looking for that silver lining,” she said.

Polling results from Ipsos’ predictions for 2020 report.

Polling results from Ipsos’ predictions for 2020 report.


Global News

Canada’s outlook on the last year was still not as negative compared to other countries around the world, the poll found.

Almost two-thirds of those polled globally thought of 2019 as a bad year for their country compared to 54 per cent of Canadians.

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7:58
Why climate change in the Arctic affects us all


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When it comes to their personal experience, only 42 per cent of Canadians thought last year was bad for them and their family compared to 50 per cent of those polled everywhere on average.

McLeod said that although she wasn’t surprised by the results, what stood out the most to her were the predictions on both climate change and loneliness.

“It’s turned into the issue of our generation,” McLeod said of climate change.

Polling results from Ipsos’ predictions for 2020 report.

Polling results from Ipsos’ predictions for 2020 report.


Global News

“We see that this is continuously an important issue for Canadians today and it has been a growing issue over the last (few) months. Environmental responsibility is important to most Canadians.”

One question on the Ipsos poll asked whether or not a person would feel lonely most of the time in 2020, a question Canadians measured 29 per cent in compared to the global average of 33 per cent.

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McLeod attributes it to the prevalence of mental health issues.


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On a lighter note, Ipsos also asked how likely it would be for aliens to visit Earth in 2020 — a scenario only 1 in 10 Canadians thought was likely.

“Some might see that as a good thing, some might see that as a bad thing but it’s just a minority of Canadians that feel that way,” said McLeod.

This Ipsos poll was an online survey of 22,512 interviews conducted between Nov. 22-Dec.6, 2019. The results were weighted to balance the demographics of the adult population among the countries surveyed. The precision of the Ipsos online poll with an unweighted probability sample and 100 per cent response rate would have an estimated margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points for a sample of 1,000, and an estimated margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points 19 times out 20 per country of what the results had been if the entire country’s adult population had been polled.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Canada's first 'presumptive positive' case of coronavirus found in Ontario – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Ontario’s chief medical officer has confirmed Canada’s first ‘presumptive positive’ case of coronavirus.

In a news conference Saturday, officials said the man in his 50s fell ill after travelling to Wuhan, the Chinese city at the heart of the outbreak. The patient is in stable condition at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

Officials in Ontario have been in contact with Canada’s public health agency and are working in collaboration with Toronto Public Health to “prevent any spread” of the virus.

Dr. Eileen De Villa, Toronto’s medical officer of health, said officials are focused on finding out who the patient may have come into contact with and what types of settings they may have been exposed to.

“It is understandable that people may be concerned with today’s news of our first case and that people may worry,”” de Villa said in a press release.

“But I assure you that based on the lessons we learned from SARS now 17 years ago, and given our experiences during the flu pandemic of 2009 and more recently, with Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome, we have learned, shared knowledge and built a stronger public health system that is ready to respond, as needed.”

So far, two coronavirus cases have been confirmed in the U.S. Australia and Malaysia reported their first cases of the virus Saturday, while Japan confirmed a third case. France confirmed three cases Friday, the first in Europe.

China’s National Health Commission confirmed Saturday that the death toll from the new virus had climbed to 41, with the number of people infected rising to 1,287.

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Canada preparing after health officials say coronovirus will ‘likely’ hit country – Global News

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As the new coronavirus claims more lives in China, health authorities in this country are trying to reassure Canadians that plans and procedures are in place to protect them.

While no cases have yet been confirmed in Canada, Dr. Peter Donnelly, with Public Health Ontario, said Friday that it is indeed “likely” the coronavirus, which comes from the same family of viruses as SARS, will arrive here.

However, Donnelly added that health officials are much better prepared now than they were in 2003 when SARS killed 44 Canadians. He noted communications are more robust, hospitals have better isolation facilities, and a reliable test is available to detect the coronavirus within 24 hours.


READ MORE:
Protocols in place to protect Guelph residents from coronavirus: Public Health

Health officials are also working with the National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg to develop an even quicker test, and screening measures have been beefed up at major airports in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. In addition, everyone is being urged to practice good hygiene that helps prevent the transmission of all viruses — washing hands thoroughly, covering coughs and sneezes, and staying home if you’re sick.

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If the coronavirus does come to Canada Donnelly said “it will still be business as normal,” and there will be no mass quarantining of people as authorities have done in Wuhan and at least 15 other Chinese cities populated by more than 50 million people.

China’s National Health Commission reported Saturday that the death toll from the new coronavirus had climbed to 41, with the number of people infected rising to 1,287. And though infection cases are also reported in the United States, France and Australia, the World Health Organization has decided, at least for now, against declaring the outbreak a global emergency.

© 2020 The Canadian Press

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Statistics Canada posted a poll on Twitter. It did not go well

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TORONTO —
Statistics Canada got more than it bargained for when it posted a poll on Twitter that asked “what age were you when you bought your first house?”

The seemingly innocuous question, however, was met with mockery and disdain by some vocal users.

The plight of Canadians unable to afford to buying a home in skyrocketing markets across the country is often turned into satire and memes on the internet, and people did not hold back their snark in response.

Vancouver was ranked the world’s second-least affordable house market for the second year in a row, and the Ontario government has begun pushing for home co-ownership to try to tackle the housing crisis.

“Can you change this to how old were you when you realized that owning a home would never be an option? Or when did the constant fear of renoviction [sic] set in?” one Twitter user replied.

“Where’s the option for I will never be able to afford one,” another wrote.

“All this thread tells me is that people make dumb decisions with money,” said one user in defense of the poll.

Another answered “I sold all my toys to afford a house. That’s what it takes. Get rid of your smartphone, your cable or streaming services, internet, sorry no avocado toast or going out. It’s only for a few years and then it’ll pay off.”

The options for answering the poll were the ages; 24 or younger, 25 to 35, 35 to 45 and 46 years-old or older.

The organization then followed up with a tweet saying that the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey showed that 50.6 per cent of first-time homebuyers in Canada were younger than 35, to which Twitter users replied, “ok boomer.”

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