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More than half of U.S. households have some investment in the stock market – Pew Research Center

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The statue “Fearless Girl,” across from the New York Stock Exchange, wearing a mask on March 22. (Luiz Roberto Lima-ANB/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Uncertainty driven by the current coronavirus outbreak has caused the U.S. stock market to wipe away three years of gains in a matter of weeks. The S&P 500 index fell from 3,386 on Feb. 19 this year to 2,305 on March 20, a loss of 32%. This rate of descent is much sharper than during the initial stages of the Great Recession, when it took from October 2007 to October 2008 to see a similar decrease in the index.

The economic stimulus package agreed to by Senate leaders and the White House appears to have restored some optimism in the market, at least for now. Even so, the losses will impact a wide swath of American families.

The steep fall in stock prices comes at a time when roughly four-in-ten U.S. workers (41%) have access to employer- or union-sponsored retirement plans, with the values of many of these plans linked to the stock market.

Data from 2016, the latest available, provides key insights into the broad reach of stock market investment in the United States. While a relatively small share of American families (14%) are directly invested in individual stocks, a majority (52%) have some level of investment in the market. Most of this comes in the form of retirement accounts such as 401(k)s.

How we did this

Participation in the stock market varies considerably across demographic groups. But even among those with annual family incomes of less than $35,000, about one-in-five have assets in the stock market. The shares increase as income rises, and among those with incomes above $100,000, 88% own stocks – either directly or indirectly. The amount of assets families hold in stocks also varies considerably by income. Among those with incomes less than $35,000, the median amount held is less than $10,000. For those at the higher end of the income scale, the median amount is more than $130,000.

Families headed by white adults are more likely than those headed by black or Hispanic adults to be invested in the stock market. A majority (61%) of non-Hispanic white households own some stock, compared with 31% of non-Hispanic black and 28% of Hispanic households. Median investments vary here as well: Among whites the median is about $51,000. By comparison, the median for black families is $12,000, and for Hispanic families it is just under $11,000.

There are differences by age as well, but even among families headed by a young adult (those under 35), 41% own some stock, either directly or indirectly. This is true of a majority of households headed by those ages 35 to 64 and half of those ages 65 and older. Assets accumulated over time also vary by age. The median amount invested by young adult households is relatively small – $7,700 among those younger than 35. And it rises steadily with age: $22,000 for households headed by 35- to 44-year-olds, $51,000 for those ages 45 to 54 and $80,000 or higher for those 55 and older.

Stocks represent a larger share of the total value of assets for some groups than others. For higher-income families (those with incomes over $100,000), whites and those ages 55 and older, investments in the stock market make up about a quarter of their total assets. For those with incomes less than $53,000, black- and Hispanic-led households and those headed by someone younger than 35, stocks represent only about 10% of their total assets.

The future direction of stock market prices is unknown. During the financial crisis that triggered the Great Recession, the S&P 500 index lost 53% of its value from October 2007 to February 2009. The recovery took longer, and it was not until March 2013 that the index returned to its pre-recession peak. From March 2013 to February 2020 the index value increased by 88%. But the losses so far in the stock market prompted by COVID-19 have turned the clock back to early 2017.

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How Does Investing In Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust (TSE:KMP.UN) Impact The Volatility Of Your Portfolio? – Yahoo Finance

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If you're interested in Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust (TSE:KMP.UN), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of share price volatility) in order to understand how the stock could impact your portfolio. Modern finance theory considers volatility to be a measure of risk, and there are two main types of price volatility. First, we have company specific volatility, which is the price gyrations of an individual stock. Holding at least 8 stocks can reduce this kind of risk across a portfolio. The second type is the broader market volatility, which you cannot diversify away, since it arises from macroeconomic factors which directly affects all the stocks on the market.” data-reactid=”28″>If you’re interested in Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust (TSE:KMP.UN), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of share price volatility) in order to understand how the stock could impact your portfolio. Modern finance theory considers volatility to be a measure of risk, and there are two main types of price volatility. First, we have company specific volatility, which is the price gyrations of an individual stock. Holding at least 8 stocks can reduce this kind of risk across a portfolio. The second type is the broader market volatility, which you cannot diversify away, since it arises from macroeconomic factors which directly affects all the stocks on the market.

Some stocks mimic the volatility of the market quite closely, while others demonstrate muted, exagerrated or uncorrelated price movements. Beta can be a useful tool to understand how much a stock is influenced by market risk (volatility). However, Warren Buffett said ‘volatility is far from synonymous with risk’ in his 2014 letter to investors. So, while useful, beta is not the only metric to consider. To use beta as an investor, you must first understand that the overall market has a beta of one. A stock with a beta greater than one is more sensitive to broader market movements than a stock with a beta of less than one.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=" View our latest analysis for Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust ” data-reactid=”30″> View our latest analysis for Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust

What we can learn from KMP.UN’s beta value

Given that it has a beta of 0.87, we can surmise that the Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust share price has not been strongly impacted by broader market volatility (over the last 5 years). This means that — if history is a guide — buying the stock would reduce the impact of overall market volatility in many portfolios (depending on the beta of the portfolio, of course). Many would argue that beta is useful in position sizing, but fundamental metrics such as revenue and earnings are more important overall. You can see Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust’s revenue and earnings in the image below.

TSX:KMP.UN Income Statement April 10th 2020TSX:KMP.UN Income Statement April 10th 2020

How does KMP.UN’s size impact its beta?

Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust is a small company, but not tiny and little known. It has a market capitalisation of CA$1.8b, which means it would be on the radar of intstitutional investors. Small companies often have a high beta value, but they can be heavily influenced by company-specific events. This might explain why this stock has a low beta.

What this means for you:

One potential advantage of owning low beta stocks like Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust is that your overall portfolio won’t be too sensitive to overall market movements. However, this can be a blessing or a curse, depending on what’s happening in the broader market. In order to fully understand whether KMP.UN is a good investment for you, we also need to consider important company-specific fundamentals such as Killam Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust’s financial health and performance track record. I urge you to continue your research by taking a look at the following:

  1. Financial Health: Are KMP.UN’s operations financially sustainable? Balance sheets can be hard to analyze, which is why we’ve done it for you. Check out our financial health checks here.
  2. Past Track Record: Has KMP.UN been consistently performing well irrespective of the ups and downs in the market? Go into more detail in the past performance analysis and take a look at the free visual representations of KMP.UN’s historicals for more clarity.
  3. Other High-Performing Stocks: Are there other stocks that provide better prospects with proven track records? Explore our free list of these great stocks here.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.” data-reactid=”53″>If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.

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Vietnam to disburse $30 billion of public investment funds this year to tackle virus impact – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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HANOI (Reuters) – Vietnam will aim to disburse $30 billion in public investment funds this year, up 67% year-on-year, the government said on Friday, as it seeks to boost an economy hit hard by the coronavirus outbreak that has infected 255 people nationally.

Public investment, excluding investment made by state-owned enterprises, often accounts for around one-fifth of Vietnam’s total investment and is spent on infrastructure and social development projects.

The Southeast Asian country’s gross domestic product in the first quarter of this year grew at its slowest pace in 10 years, at 3.8% due to the pandemic.

(Reporting by Khanh Vu; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman)

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Vietnam to disburse $30 billion of public investment funds this year to tackle virus impact – The Guardian

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HANOI (Reuters) – Vietnam will aim to disburse $30 billion in public investment funds this year, up 67% year-on-year, the government said on Friday, as it seeks to boost an economy hit hard by the coronavirus outbreak that has infected 255 people nationally.

Public investment, excluding investment made by state-owned enterprises, often accounts for around one-fifth of Vietnam’s total investment and is spent on infrastructure and social development projects.

The Southeast Asian country’s gross domestic product in the first quarter of this year grew at its slowest pace in 10 years, at 3.8% due to the pandemic.

(Reporting by Khanh Vu; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman)

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