adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

News

Murray Sinclair to help AFN with conflict resolution after ‘turmoil’: national chief

Published

 on

Murray Sinclair, a former senator and commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, will help the Assembly of First Nations with conflict resolution in 2023, national chief RoseAnne Archibald said Tuesday.

Archibald made the announcement in her opening remarks to chiefs gathered in Ottawa for a three-day special assembly.

The organization, which serves as the national advocacy voice for more than 600 First Nations, has spent months dealing with infighting in its highest ranks over complaints lodged against Archibald by her staff.

That conflict played out in public during the last AFN gathering in Vancouver in July. Archibald attended the meetings despite a vote by the executive committee and board of directors to temporarily suspend her leadership after they said a public statement she made about the workplace complaints violated its terms of confidentiality.

300x250x1

During that convention, chiefs voted down an emergency resolution to affirm her suspension. Archibald then took the stage to express her gratitude, alleging she was unjustly suspended because she had been trying to investigate corruption within the assembly.

So before beginning her address on Tuesday, Archibald encouraged the room to take a moment to breathe.

“I think we’re all kind of holding our breath.”

She told the chiefs the organization has important matters it must deal with and warned that it cannot afford to spend more time embroiled in conflict.

“We can’t spend another minute, never mind a chiefs’ assembly, in turmoil,” said Archibald.

“Our people are watching.”

Archibald said there are still human resources and legal matters that need to be resolved in the coming months. One major one is the internal investigation into allegations made by against Archibald herself by five complainants.

Raquel Chisholm, a lawyer the organization hired back in May to oversee the process, delivered a video message to the chiefs Tuesday informing them investigators haven’t yet had a chance to interview Archibald because she expressed concerns through her legal counsel “about the fairness of the process.”

Chisholm says the investigators looking into the matter are independent and she committed to address any concerns parties have, expressing hope an interview with the national chief would happen this month.

Since the July gathering — which one chief who took the mic referred to as a “gong show” — she said she has “made every effort to heal and create harmony” in her relationships with the regional chiefs.

“In the new year, former justice and senator Murray Sinclair will be assisting us with conflict resolution and mediation.”

Archibald’s call to look beyond the inner conflict was echoed by other speakers, including Chief Dylan Whiteduck of Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, near Ottawa, who said he felt what transpired in July “compromised” their integrity as chiefs.

“It’s time to move on and work for our people. That’s why we’re here today as elected officials and chiefs and councils and proxies, so please work together,” he said to applause from the room.

A similar sentiment was echoed by a co-chair of the AFN’s national youth council.

“We need to put away the animosity and egos so we can work together in this very limited time that we have in these next few days,” said Rosalie LaBillois of Eel River Bar First Nation.

“Our fight is not with each other. Our fight is for the protection of our land, for the protection and safety of our people and for the recognition and assertion of our ways.”

Adam Fiddler, a co-chair of the assembly, said chiefs have 70 draft resolutions to deal with, after only voting on five back in July. They cover topics including child welfare, justice reform and legislation for clean drinking water.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and cabinet ministers tasked with leading files that deal directly with matters affecting First Nations are set to address the assembly later in the week.

Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet are also expected to speak.

Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre has instead recorded a video message. His office said he will be out of town that day.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

News

Alberta to require 'free speech reporting' after uproar over controversial academic visit – CBC.ca

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Alberta to require ‘free speech reporting’ after uproar over controversial academic visit  CBC.ca

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

News

Canada’s Black population faces varying job prospects despite equal education. Here’s why – Global News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Canada’s Black population faces varying job prospects despite equal education. Here’s why  Global News

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

News

Inflation in Canada: Finance ministers meet

Published

 on

TORONTO – The two big spending pressures on the federal government right now are health care and the global transition to a clean economy, Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said Friday.
After hosting an in-person meeting with the provincial and territorial finance ministers, Freeland said U.S. President Joe Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act, which includes electric-vehicle incentives that favour manufacturers in Canada and Mexico as well as the U.S., has changed the playing field when it comes to the global competition for capital.

“I cannot emphasize too strongly how much I believe that we need to seize the moment and build the clean economy of the 21st century,” Freeland said during a news conference held at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

Food prices set to increase — again — as blackout on price hikes ends at some stores
Still no answers on yearslong bread price-fixing scandal: law professor
Loblaw ends No Name price freeze, vows ‘flat’ pricing ‘wherever possible’
BCE says it’s ready for price competition, reports Q4 profits down
“This is a huge economic opportunity.”

Capital Dispatch: Sign up for in-depth political coverage of Parliament Hill

300x250x1

Canada needs to invest in the transition in order to potentially have an outsized share in the economy of the future, she said, or it risks being left behind.

This year in particular will be an important year for attracting capital to Canada, she said, calling for the provinces and territories to chip in.

“This is a truly historic, once-in-a-generation economic moment and it will take a team Canada effort to seize it.”

At the same time, Freeland spoke of the need for fiscal restraint amid economic uncertainty.

“We know that one of the most important things the federal government can do to help Canadians today is to be mindful of our responsibility not to pour fuel on the fire of inflation,” she said.

Freeland said these two major spending pressures, which were among the topics prioritized at Friday’s meeting, come at a time of a global economic slowdown which poses restraint on government spending.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to meet with the premiers Feb. 7 to discuss a long-awaited deal on health-care spending. The provinces have been asking for increases to the health transfer to the tune of billions of dollars.

Freeland said it’s clear that the federal government needs to invest in health care and reiterated the government’s commitment to doing so but would not say whether she thinks the amount the provinces are asking for in increased health transfers is feasible.

“It’s time to see the numbers,” Quebec Finance Minister Eric Girard said Friday afternoon, in anticipation of the Feb. 7 meeting.

The meeting of the finance ministers comes at a tense time for many Canadian consumers, with inflation still running hot and interest rates much higher than they were a year ago.

The ministers also spoke with Bank of Canada governor Tiff Macklem Friday and discussed the economic outlook for Canada and the world, said Freeland.

“We’re very aware of the uncertainty in the global economy right now,” said Freeland. “Inflation is high and interest rates are high.”

“Things are tough for a lot of Canadians and a lot of Canadian families today and at the federal level, this is a time of real fiscal constraint.”

The Bank of Canada raised its key interest rate again last week, bringing it to 4.5 per cent, but signalled it’s taking a pause to let the impact of its aggressive hiking cycle sink in.

The economy is showing signs of slowing, but inflation was still high at 6.3 per cent in December, with food prices in particular remaining elevated year over year.

Interest rates have put a damper on the housing market, sending prices and sales downward for months on end even as the cost of renting went up in 2022.

Meanwhile, the labour market has remained strong, with the unemployment rate nearing record lows in December at five per cent.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 3, 2023.

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending