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N.B. gets a trim after COVID-19 lockdown – CBC.ca

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New Brunswick’s move to the next phase of COVID-19 recovery has brought some shear relief for people who were starting to look shaggy since restrictions began.

On Friday, Premier Blaine Higgs moved the province into the yellow phase — allowing hair salons and barbershops to reopen.

For people who have gone longer than normal without professional grooming, it was a long-awaited moment. 

Chris DeLong was one of the first people in the chair at Hair Hunters in Fredericton, where he’s been getting haircuts for more than five years. 

DeLong normally gets a haircut every three weeks. But he had to wait three months to get a fresh look Saturday.

“I was adjusting to it,” DeLong laughed, adding that he decided to leave his hair longer on top now than did before the shutdown. 

DeLong was relieved to get a haircut and catch up with the staff at the salon. But he admits it’s a different experience now.

Chris DeLong said he was getting used to his long hair during the lockdown, but was relieved to get a fresh cut on Saturday. (Gary Moore/CBC)

“It’s kinda strange, though,” DeLong said.

Anyone entering the salon must have an appointment. Customers are screened for COVID-19 symptoms, which includes a temperature check at the door.

Customers have to sign in and leave a phone number in case contact tracing becomes necessary. Everyone must wear a mask and staff are equipped with face shields.

There are plastic curtains hanging next to each chair to separate customers.

DeLong said he understands the requirements, but said it takes away from the social experience.

“Just the gear that everybody has to wear is a little off-putting, actually,” he said.

Karen Kindred agrees with DeLong. She said it was a “surreal” experience to get a haircut Saturday.

Kindred decided to use the shutdown as a chance to experiment with a different look.

Jon Filder is one of the owners of Hair Hunters salon in Fredericton. Staff wear a mask and a face shield while cutting hair. (Gary Moore/CBC)

“I always wanted to grow it out to see if I like it, because I always kept my hair short,” Kindred said. 

But she said her long hair started to get to her over the past week or two. She realized she likes her hair better cut short, and was ecstatic to get a haircut.

“This was my chance to realize that I don’t really like it this length. So it was time to get ‘er all done up.”

Jon Fidler, one of the owners of Hair Hunters, said it’s been hard work to get the salon ready to reopen.

“I now have more sterilizing stuff on my station than I do, probably, hair products,” he said.

But Fidler said it was worth the effort to be able to start seeing his customers again.

“After 37 years in the business … you look forward to seeing all these people,” Fidler said. “You’re used to seeing them every month or two and then all of a sudden you don’t see anybody.”

Not all salons were ready to reopen on Saturday. Some decided to wait a couple of days to finish putting the final touches on their pandemic protocols. 

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OPEC, allied nations extend nearly 10M barrel cut by a month – World News – Castanet.net

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OPEC and allied nations agreed Saturday to extend a production cut of nearly 10 million barrels of oil a day through the end of July, hoping to encourage stability in energy markets hard hit by the coronavirus-induced global economic crisis.

Ministers of the cartel and outside nations led by Russia met via video conference to adopt the measure, aimed at cutting the excess production depressing prices as global aviation remains largely grounded due to the pandemic. The curbed output represents some 10% of the world’s overall supply.

But danger still lurks for the market, even as a number of nations ease virus-related lockdowns, and enforcing compliance remains thorny.

Algerian Oil Minister Mohamed Arkab, the current OPEC president, warned meeting attendees that the global oil inventory would soar to 1.5 billion barrels by the mid-point of this year.

“Despite the progress to date, we cannot afford to rest on our laurels,” Arkab said. “The challenges we face remain daunting.”

That was a message echoed by Saudi Oil Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman, who acknowledged “we all have made sacrifices to make it where we are today.” He said he remained shocked by the day in April when U.S. oil futures plunged below zero.

“There are encouraging signs we are over the worst,” he said.

Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak similarly called April “the worst month in history” for the global oil market.

The decision came in a unanimous vote, Energy Minister Suhail al-Mazrouei of the United Arab Emirates wrote on Twitter. He called it “a courageous decision.”

But it is only a one-month extension of a production cut that was deep enough “to keep prices from going so low that it creates global financial risk but not enough to make prices very high, which would be a burden to consumers in a recessionary time,” said Amy Myers Jaffe, senior fellow at the Council for Foreign Relations.

“There is so much uncertainty that I think they took a conservative approach,” she said. “You don’t know how much production is going to come back on. You don’t know what’s going to happen with demand. You don’t know if there’s going to be a second (pandemic) wave.”

Jaffe said improved oil demand in China and Asia and a gradual stabilization of demand in the United States and to some extent Europe, where there’s some cautious economic reopening, were encouraging for producers.

OPEC has 13 member states and is largely dominated by oil-rich Saudi Arabia. The additional countries involved part in the so-called OPEC Plus accord have been led by Russia, with Mexico under President Andrés Manuel López Obrador playing a considerable role at the last minute in the initial agreement.

Crude oil prices have been gaining in recent days, in part on hopes OPEC would continue the cut. International benchmark Brent crude traded Saturday at over $42 a barrel. Brent had crashed below $20 a barrel in April.

Earlier this year, when demand was down, Saudi Arabia was flooding the market with crude oil, helping to send prices down to record lows. That prompted the U.S. government in April to take the unusual step of getting involved in OPEC’s negotiations, pressuring members of the cartel to agree to cuts to help end the oil price free-fall.

At the time, President Donald Trump said the U.S. would help take on some of the cuts that Mexico was unwilling to make. And perhaps more importantly, a group of U.S. senators upset over the impact on U.S. shale production said at the time that they had drafted legislation which would remove American forces, including Patriot Missile batteries, from Saudi Arabia.

Under a deal reached in April, OPEC and allied countries were to cut nearly 10 million barrels per day until July, then 8 million barrels per day through the end of the year, and 6 million a day for 16 months beginning in 2021.

In a rambling Rose Garden speech on Friday, Trump took credit for the April deal. “People said that wasn’t possible but we got Saudi Arabia, Russia and others to cut back substantially,” he said. “We appreciate that very much.”

U.S. Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette tweeted his applause Saturday for the extension, which he said comes “at a pivotal time as oil demand continues to recover and economies reopen around the world.”

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HSBC warns it could face reprisals in China if UK bans Huawei equipment: Telegraph – Investing.com

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© Reuters. HSBC’s building in Canary Wharf is seen behind a City of London sign outside Billingsgate Market in London

(Reuters) – HSBC Holdings Plc (L:) Chairman Mark Tucker has warned Britain against a ban on networking equipment made by Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, claiming the bank could face reprisals in China, the Telegraph reported on Saturday.

Tucker made the claim in private representations to British Prime Minster Boris Johnson’s advisers, the newspaper reported https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2020/06/06/hsbc-warns-downing-street-chinese-reprisals-huawei, citing industry and political sources.

Britain designated Huawei a “high-risk vendor” in January, capping its 5G involvement at 35% and excluding it from the data-heavy core of the network. It is looking at the possibility of phasing Huawei out of its 5G network completely by 2023, according to officials.

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HSBC warns it could face reprisals in China if UK bans Huawei equipment: Telegraph – Reuters

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FILE PHOTO: HSBC’s building in Canary Wharf is seen behind a City of London sign outside Billingsgate Market in London, Britain, August 8, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

(Reuters) – HSBC Holdings Plc (HSBA.L) Chairman Mark Tucker has warned Britain against a ban on networking equipment made by Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, claiming the bank could face reprisals in China, the Telegraph reported on Saturday.

Tucker made the claim in private representations to British Prime Minster Boris Johnson’s advisers, the newspaper reported here citing industry and political sources.

Britain designated Huawei a “high-risk vendor” in January, capping its 5G involvement at 35% and excluding it from the data-heavy core of the network. It is looking at the possibility of phasing Huawei out of its 5G network completely by 2023, according to officials.

Reporting by Ismail Shakil in Bengaluru; Editing by Dan Grebler

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