Connect with us

Investment

Nanaimo's recovery task force recommends pride of place, strategic investment – Nanaimo News Bulletin

Published

 on


A task force on recovery and resilience in COVID-19 times is recommending that Nanaimo show pride of place and work with partners toward big-ticket projects.

The City of Nanaimo’s mayor’s task force on recovery and resilience reported to city council Monday, presenting six primary recommendations.

The task force calls for Nanaimo to strengthen pride of place, convene a “leaders’ table” to build community collaboration, pursue strategic investments such as a tertiary hospital, promote reconciliation and combat racism, prioritize emergency preparedness, and support small business.

Donna Hais, a member of the mayor’s task force, presented the recommendations and said while a lot of people might have been hoping for a “magic answer” for their own sector, the task force believes the recommendations are connected and intended to affect everyone and benefit everyone.

“They’ll make us stronger; they’ll make us more ready for the next [challenge] because there will be something else … And not only that, they will just overall make us better as a community…” Hais said. “You need to contribute, you need to get involved and you need to be part of the solution because it involves all of us.”

The pride of place recommendation, referred to as “Nanaimo builds,” is meant to be a citizen-driven campaign challenging people to talk about things they like about Nanaimo.

“We truly are a lucky and blessed city…” Hais said. “Look at where we live as the Harbour City. We need to build that enthusiasm and share what’s positive about Nanaimo.”

Coun. Zeni Maartman expressed a hope that city council members will post on social media about positive things they see and hear, and Coun. Erin Hemmens also spoke in support of the recommendation.

“Pride of place is something that we’ve always struggled with and I think if we can nail it, that will be a major leap forward for how people experience our city,” Hemmens said.

The leaders’ table suggestion, recommended as a way to create an aligned approach in pursuing capital infrastructure investment, is tied to the strategic investment priority. Some of the targeted projects the task force put forward were a downtown node, a logistics hub for the Port of Nanaimo, a tertiary hospital, physical and digital connections at VIU, waterfront assets including the Harbourfront Walkway, a transportation hub, and general technology readiness.

Coun. Ben Geselbracht said a collaborative approach to those kinds of projects could help break some of the silos that exist.

“We do need to put in the effort of building a shared, unified voice and vision for the community and part of that is a really strong, shared voice to ask the senior levels of government for the investment that we need to deal with the big issues that we’re facing,” he said.

The recommendations around small business included supporting elimination of the speculation tax, lobbying for federal emergency benefits that don’t incentivize unemployment, and developing transportation and digital infrastructure with an eye to the needs of small businesses.

READ ALSO: Task force getting started on guiding Nanaimo’s economic recovery out of pandemic

Mayor Leonard Krog said the task force’s recommendations don’t have all the answers, then asked rhetorically if anyone ever has all the answers.

“The answers are going to come by the implementation of these recommendations, assuming that council will support the document, and the job is then on council’s shoulders and then on the leaders’ table … and the individual citizens who have received the rallying cry tonight…” Krog said. “Just living here isn’t enough. Living here is the benefit that you get by being here. Being a citizen is making it a wonderful place for all your fellow citizens and residents, and we have an opportunity.”

READ ALSO: Not-so-rosy State of the Island report caps off virtual summit



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

City Hall

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Manulife Investment Management Launches Five Smart Exchange-Traded Funds – Canada NewsWire

Published

 on


C$ unless otherwise stated      
TSX/NYSE/PSE: MFC     SEHK: 945 

TORONTO, Nov. 25, 2020 /CNW/ – Manulife Investment Management announced five new Smart Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) have closed their initial offering of units and will begin trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange today. The three Canadian fixed income ETFs and two equity ETFs will provide investors with the opportunity to access the growing popularity of the ETF structure while taking advantage of Manulife’s investment expertise with active quantitative strategies.

Manulife Smart Dividend ETF and Manulife Smart U.S. Dividend ETF are tailored for Canadian investors looking for income producing investments that can provide a steady cash flow stream. They seek to provide a steady flow of income and long-term capital appreciation by investing in a diversified portfolio of dividend paying securities.

Manulife Smart Short-Term Bond ETF, Manulife Smart Core Bond ETF and Manulife Smart Corporate Bond ETF aim to support investors looking to generate steady income in their investment. They seek to earn the highest level of income consistent with the preservation of capital by investing in a diversified portfolio of fixed income securities.

“Manulife Investment Management’s new exchange-traded funds have an attractive price point within their respective categories, which offer a good balance between price and the potential to outperform,” said Bernard Letendre, Head of Wealth and Asset Management, Canada. “Adding these new Manulife ETFs are part of our commitment to investors to provide them with the most amount of value.”

ETF name

Ticker

Manulife Smart Short-Term Bond ETF

TERM

Manulife Smart Core Bond ETF

BSKT

Manulife Smart Corporate Bond ETF

CBND

Manulife Smart Dividend ETF

CDIV

Manulife Smart U.S. Dividend ETF

UDIV (hedged)

UDIV.B (unhedged)

Manulife Investment Management is always looking to expand its line up to meet the growing and diverse needs of investors. The new Manulife Smart ETFs showcase our active management capabilities and commitment to offering investors investment options at different price points.

Manulife ETFs are managed by Manulife Investment Management Limited (formerly named Manulife Asset Management Limited). Manulife Investment Management is a trade name of Manulife Investment Management Limited. Commissions, management fees and expenses all may be associated with exchange traded funds (ETFs). Investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses and other important information are contained in the ETF Facts as well as the prospectus, please read before investing. ETFs are not guaranteed, their values change frequently, and past performance may not be repeated.

About Manulife Investment Management

Manulife Investment Management is the global wealth and asset management segment of Manulife Financial Corporation. We draw on more than a century of financial stewardship and the full resources of our parent company to serve individuals, institutions, and retirement plan members worldwide. Headquartered in Toronto, our leading capabilities in public and private markets are strengthened by an investment footprint that spans 17 countries and territories. We complement these capabilities by providing access to a network of unaffiliated asset managers from around the world. We’re committed to investing responsibly across our businesses. We develop innovative global frameworks for sustainable investing, collaboratively engage with companies in our securities portfolios, and maintain a high standard of stewardship where we own and operate assets, and we believe in supporting financial well-being through our workplace retirement plans. Today, plan sponsors around the world rely on our retirement plan administration and investment expertise to help their employees plan for, save for, and live a better retirement. 

As of September 30, 2020, Manulife Investment Management had CAD$923 billion (US$692 billion) in assets under management and administration. Not all offerings are available in all jurisdictions. For additional information, please visit manulifeim.com.

About Manulife

Manulife Financial Corporation is a leading international financial services group that helps people make their decisions easier and lives better. With our global headquarters in Toronto, Canada, we operate as Manulife across our offices in Canada, Asia, and Europe, and primarily as John Hancock in the United States. We provide financial advice, insurance, and wealth and asset management solutions for individuals, groups and institutions. At the end of 2019, we had more than 35,000 employees, over 98,000 agents, and thousands of distribution partners, serving almost 30 million customers. As of September 30, 2020, we had $1.3 trillion (US$943 billion) in assets under management and administration, and in the previous 12 months we made $31.2 billion in payments to our customers. Our principal operations are in Asia, Canada and the United States where we have served customers for more than 155 years. We trade as ‘MFC’ on the Toronto, New York, and the Philippine stock exchanges and under ‘945’ in Hong Kong.

SOURCE Manulife Investment Management

For further information: Media Contact, Olivia Jones, Manulife, 438-340-3416, [email protected]

Related Links

https://www.manulifeim.com/

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Council varies its investment policy – BC Local News – BCLocalNews

Published

 on


The District of Houston has bolstered its policy of placing public monies in local financial institutions by allowing the amount to be invested to exceed othwerwise specified limits.

It means that $7.5 million in investments coming due Dec. 31 can be placed with either the Bulkley Valley Credit Union or the Royal Bank or with both and not placed elsewhere.

In a detailed presentation made to council Nov. 17, District of Houston chief administrative officer Gerald Pinchbeck, also the District’s financial officer, noted the District’s existing policy sets dollar amount limits based on a percentage of the District’s total investment account and on a percentage of the assets of the Bulkley Valley Credit Union.

The same policy also sets limits on what can be invested with the Royal Bank, the only other financial institution in the community, based on the percentage of securities within the District’s total investment portfolio.

“If there are any overages, then upon maturity the investments woud need to be made elsewhere,” he said.

The District’s investment mix includes term deposits now at the credit union which are guaranteed and senior government and corporate bonds.

In approving of the move to exceed the investment limits in the policy, council directed that the policy be brought back for a further review at a future date.

“Investments under the temporary policy variance will be made by reviewing the rates being offered, the security of the investments available, and the expected return on investment,” said Pinchbeck.

The money the District invests are not required for its current operating or capital spending obligations.

The District’s long-standing policy of placing investments with financial institutions that have a presence in the community reflects its commitment to recognize and support local businesses.

Houston Today

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Feedback Isn’t Just A Gift-It’s An Investment – Forbes

Published

 on


It’s often said that feedback is a gift. But the truth is—feedback is an investment.

A colleague and I recently received feedback from a client about a session we had facilitated that did not meet their expectations. The client reported that participants were not adequately engaged by the content and that we didn’t leave enough room for discussion. They even complained about our choice of closing music. (I guess not everyone appreciates Kelly Clarkson.)  The feedback was thoughtfully delivered, but it still hit hard. I took a few deep breaths, thanked the client and discussed how to improve the next session. My colleague and I incorporated the feedback into our next workshop plan, and they loved it. Their critical feedback was key to our success. 

If someone cares enough about you to give you feedback, it is a sign that they care about the relationship. Our client was able to deliver important critical feedback to us because we had built a foundation of trust. We had been working with them for more than a year, conducting workshops, having frequent calls, getting to know one another as professionals and as human beings. We had also invested in the relationship in big and small ways. This meant that when we stumbled, our client did not see us as just another vendor who could be easily replaced. Instead, they came to us and shared their concerns. And though the feedback was a bit painful, it helped us grow and strengthen the relationship. 

For many people, the investment of giving critical feedback feels risky.  A 2017 study of managers, whose job it is to give feedback, found that 44% report discomfort giving negative feedback and 21% avoid it. Why? In my experience conducting feedback trainings, many professionals express fear that they will encounter defensiveness, worry that the feedback will damage the relationship, and hopelessness about people’s ability to change. These perceived risks are a lot to overcome.

So if someone who is not required to give you feedback takes the risk of offering you what Warren Buffet calls the “very expensive gift” of honesty and gives you critical feedback, they are signaling that (1) the issue matters to them, (2) the relationship matters to them, and (3) they believe—or at least hope—that improvement is possible. That is good news.

Getting critical feedback stings. When someone tells you that something you did harmed them or bugged them or didn’t work for them, it is natural to feel embarrassed, hurt or defensive. But there is something even worse than getting critical feedback about a blind spot: when someone withholds important feedback, denying you the opportunity to learn, improve and repair. So the next time someone gives you critical feedback, even if it stings, remember that it signals that they are investing some of their personal capital in you. Really listen with curiosity. How can you make their investment pay off for both of you?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending