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NASA says asteroid Bennu has 1 in 1,750 chance of smashing into Earth – CNET

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Bennu.


NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

Data collected from a NASA spacecraft’s visit to the potentially hazardous asteroid Bennu reveals future generations will want to keep a close eye on the big space rock as it makes close passes by Earth in the 22nd century.

Researchers used information from the Osiris-Rex mission that spent over two years orbiting, studying and even sampling Bennu to get a better idea of its future path through the inner solar system. They found the minuscule chance the 1,700-foot-wide (518 meter) boulder will impact our planet in the future is actually slightly higher than previously thought, but still nothing to lose sleep over.

“I’m not any more concerned about Bennu than I was before,” Davide Farnocchia of NASA’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies (Cneos) told reporters on a call Wednesday. “The impact probability remains small.”

That probability is about 1 in 1,750, or 0.06%, between now and the year 2300, and we can rule out any chance of impact between today and 2135. That’s the year Bennu will come closer to Earth than the moon in September.

Farnocchia explained there’s no threat of a collision during that close pass, but before Osiris-Rex, there had been some significant uncertainty about how some effects, like our planet’s gravity, could alter Bennu’s path, perhaps making a later impact more likely.

The research team used the Osiris-Rex data to look at everything from the possible influence of the spacecraft itself — the models say it didn’t alter the asteroid’s path — to the tiny force that the sun’s heat can exert on a small body, which is called the Yarkovsky effect.

“The effect on Bennu is equivalent to the weight of three grapes constantly acting on the asteroid,” explains Steve Chesley, a senior research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “Tiny, yes, but significant when determining Bennu’s future impact chances over the decades and centuries to come.”

Farnocchia, Chesley and several other colleagues authored a study on Bennu’s future travels that’s published in the latest edition of the journal Icarus. 

Basically, the new research allows humanity to keep kicking the can of Bennu anxiety further down the road. We can now say confidently that there’s nothing to worry about through 2135, and probably nothing to worry about until at least 2300, but you can bet that researchers in coming years will be looking closely at the asteroid’s travel plans for September of 2182.


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Specifically, Sept. 24, 2182, is the most significant single date on Bennu’s itinerary because it has a .04% chance of impacting Earth that day. Another way to look at that, of course, is that there is a 99.96 chance it won’t hit us.

“We shouldn’t be worried about it very much,” Farnocchia reiterates. “We have time to keep tracking the asteroid.”

Indeed, but let’s just please make sure that a copy of the study makes it into all apocalypse-proof bunkers worldwide, in case of the unlikely event CNET and the internet don’t exist in 2182.

Follow CNET’s 2021 Space Calendar to stay up to date with all the latest space news this year. You can even add it to your own Google Calendar.  

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This Canadian 'Dark Sky Highway' is a stargazer dream – The Weather Network

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E.C. Manning Provincial Park is one of the most popular provincial parks in British Columbia.

Located in the heart of the Cascade Mountains, its climate and geography have combined to make this park a go-to destination for stargazers across the country.

The park is within a three-hour drive from either the Lower Mainland or the Okanagan, with the closest city being about 45 minutes away. Road trippers can get there using BC Highway 3, also known as the Crowsnest Highway, located along what has become known as the Dark Sky Highway, due to the limited light pollution.


Photo of the night sky captured along B.C.’s Dark Sky Highway. The five bright stars stretched out through the right-hand side of the image are part of the constellation Ursa Major, aka the Big Dipper. (Mia Gordon)

Every year, photographers from around the country come out here to get a good glimpse of the Milky Way and other incredible constellations, and now the Manning Resort and the park are working towards becoming a dark sky designation.

“That means it is a continued commitment to preserve and protect the night and the environment but more specifically the organisms that live in the park that rely on the night to hunt and navigate,” explained Manning Park Communications Manager Emma Schram.

Every year, the resort partners with the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada for an Astronomy Weekend, where visitors can speak with experts, learn how to use a telescope, and even participate in yoga under the stars. This year’s event is taking place October 15-17, and while it is sold out, any time of year is the perfect time to go stargazing in the park.

Learn more about this stargazer’s dream destination in the video above.


Thumbnail image courtesy: Getty Images

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Faces of 3 Egyptian mummies revealed for the first time – Editorials 99

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New DNA sequencing technology is giving us a first glimpse at what ancient men looked like — before they were mummies.

Genetic researchers have revealed highly detailed three-dimensional renderings of the faces of three Egyptian men who lived more than 2,000 years ago, using DNA pulled from their mummified remains.

The digital reconstructions show the men at age 25, who were unearthed in the vicinity of the ancient Egyptian city of Abusir el-Meleq, in the south of Cairo. Scientists estimate the men were each buried sometime between 1380 B.C. and A.D. 425, Live Science has reported. Their DNA was previously sequenced in 2017 at the Max Planck institute in Germany — at the time, the first successful reconstruction of an Egyptian mummy’s genome in history.

Since then, researchers at Parabon NanoLabs in Reston, Virginia have used forensic DNA phenotyping to create 3D models of the men’s faces, a process by which genetic data is used to predict facial features and other physical characteristics of the sampled mummy.

“This is the first time comprehensive DNA phenotyping has been performed on human DNA of this age,” Parabon said in a statement

The technology is already being used to solve modern cold cases involving unidentified victims.
Parabon NanoLabs

The lab used a combination of efforts to reconstruct the faces. Some features, including skin and eye color, can be predicted via genetic markers in the individual’s genome, while others are measured through what’s left of their physical remains.

Parabon’s methods revealed that the men had light brown skin with dark eyes and hair, and that the men were more genetically similar to modern-day Mediterranean populations than that of Egypt today.

Their process had to account for the fact that human DNA degrades over time, and is likely to be contaminated by bacterial DNA. In this case, researchers use genetic commonalities between human populations to fill in the gaps of their mummy genome.

Researchers see that this process could eventually be used in contemporary forensics, in order to identify more recent remains of unknown individuals.

Parabon’s work in genetics has already been used to crack 175 cold cases, including nine solved using the methods described in the current study, they told Live Science.

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Some animal species can survive successfully without sexual reproduction: study – CTV News

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TORONTO —
An international team of researchers have found that some animals can survive over very long periods of time — possibly millions of years — without sexual reproduction.

By studying a tiny beetle mite species, just one-fifth of a millimetre in size, scientists found that asexual reproduction can be successful in the long term.

The study authors note that until now, the survival of an animal species over a geologically long period of time without sexual reproduction was considered very unlikely, if not impossible.

Asexual reproduction involves one parent and produces offspring that are genetically identical to each other and the parent, while sexual reproduction involves two parents and produces offspring that are genetically unique.

Using the Oppiella nova beetle mite, an all-female species, researchers from the Universities of Cologne and Göttingen, the University in Lausanne in Switzerland and the University of Montpellier in France, demonstrated for the first time the so-called Meselson effect in animals.

According to the study, the Meselson effect is a characteristic trace in the genome of an organism that suggests “purely asexual reproduction.”

In the study, researchers looked at different populations of the Oppiella nova and the closely related, but sexually reproducing species, Oppiella subpectinata in Germany and sequenced their genomes. The study found that the sequencing of the Oppiella nova genomes showed the Meselson effect.

The findings were published Tuesday in peer-reviewed scientific journal PNAS.

Scientists had previously considered the Oppiella nova species an “ancient asexual scandal” as they couldn’t determine how the beetles were managing to reproduce without having sexual intercourse.

Initially, the study notes that biologists thought these beetles were hiding their acts of reproduction.

“There could be, for example, some kind of ‘cryptic’ sexual exchange that is not known. Or not yet known,” first author of the study Alexander Brandt of the University of Lausanne said in a press release.

“For example, very rarely a reproductive male could be produced after all — possibly even ‘by accident’,” he added.

However, the Oppiella nova beetle mite clones itself rather than reproducing, according to the study.

Researchers say the existence of ancient asexual animal species can be difficult to explain as asexual reproduction can seem “very disadvantageous” in the long term due to a lack of genetic diversity.

Biologists say there is typically an “evolutionary advantage” to having two different genomes that only a pair of parents can supply. Through sexual reproduction, this ensures a “constant ‘mixing’ of the two copies” of the genome in each of their cells.

This means that the two sets of genetic information remain very similar, but there are differences that allow organisms on earth to adapt over time, evolving characteristics that best suit the changing environment.

Researchers also found that it is possible for asexually reproducing species to introduce genetic variance into their genomes and thus adapt to their environment during evolution, despite producing genetic clones of themselves.

Scientists say that lack of “genome mixing” compared to sexual species causes the two genome copies of asexual animals to accumulate separate mutations and evolve independently over time.

While the survival rate of a species without sexual reproduction is quite rare, scientists conclude that it is not impossible.

“Our results clearly show that O. nova reproduces exclusively asexually. When it comes to understanding how evolution works without sex, these beetle mites could still provide a surprise or two,” Jens Bast, junior research group leader at the University of Cologne, said in the press release.

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