Connect with us

Economy

New National Wage Subsidy Will Integrate Skilled Newcomers Into Canada's Bio-economy – Financial Post

Published

 on


Article content

OTTAWA, Ontario — Today, BioTalent Canada announced the launch of a new program: the Skilled Newcomer Internships for the Bio-economy program that will provide employers with funds to integrate skilled newcomers and internationally educated professionals (IEPs) into the Canadian bio-economy. The $2.9M project helps bio-economy employers access skilled individuals they might not have otherwise considered for roles.

Funded in part by the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program, Skilled Newcomer Internships for the Bio-economy provides employers with 75% of a participant’s salary to a maximum of $20,000 for a three to nine-month job placement.

Article content

“Newcomers and IEPs make up only 26% of our industry which is facing a shortage of 65,000 workers by the end of the decade, according to a recently released National Labour Market Information (LMI) study,” says Rob Henderson, President and CEO of BioTalent Canada. “Programs like Skilled Newcomer Internships for the Bio-economy are vital resources for an industry that has long relied on antiquated human resources and arm’s-length recruitment which severely limit the talent pool.”

One of the biggest obstacles newcomers and IEPs face when they come to Canada is having their skills recognized by employers. With that understanding, Skilled Newcomer Internships for the Bio-economy provides participants with access to the BioSkills Recognition Program upon completion of their placement. They’re also granted free enrolment in BioTalent Canada’s Essential Skills and Technical Skills Fundamentals training. All of this helps newcomers and IEPs become BioReady™ and builds confidence in employers to hire them full-time.

“The BioReady™ designation helps employers recognize the competencies that newcomers are able to demonstrate,” says Iona Santos-Fresnoza, Program Lead at IEC-BC, a non-profit organization that connects employers to immigrant talent. “And it has worked for our FAST participants. We have clients who’ve said that getting the BioReady™ certificate was actually a crucial piece in their getting hired.”

“Attracting talent from around the world is essential to Canada’s economic growth and addressing labour shortages. That’s why we’re investing in BioTalent Canada, to help connect hard-working newcomers with skills development and job opportunities in the science sectors across the country.”

– Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough

The Skilled Newcomer Internships for the Bio-economy program runs through October 2023 and aims to place more than 165 newcomers and IEPs with small- and medium-sized enterprises across Canada. For more information on this program, or to apply, visit biotalent.ca/skillednewcomers

Rob Henderson is available for comment.

Funded in part by the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

About BioTalent Canada

BioTalent Canada supports the people behind life-changing science. Trusted as the go-to source for labour market intelligence, BioTalent Canada guides bio-economy stakeholders with evidence-based data and industry-driven standards. BioTalent Canada is focused on igniting the industry’s brainpower bridging the gap between job-ready talent and employers and ensuring the long-term agility, resiliency, and sustainability of one of Canada’s most vital sectors.

Article content

Recently named one of the 50 Best Workplaces in Canada with 10-50 employees and certified as a Great Place to Work® for 2021, BioTalent Canada practices the same industry standards it recommends to its stakeholders. These distinctions were awarded to BioTalent Canada following a thorough and independent survey analysis conducted by Great Place to Work®.

For more information visit biotalent.ca .

About Skilled Newcomer Internships for the Bio-economy

Skilled Newcomer Internship for the Bio-economy opens to the door, and offers valuable work experience, to newcomers and internationally educated professionals (IEPs). The program provides employers with up to 75% of a participant’s salary to a maximum of $20,000 for a three- to nine-month placement. It helps employers access talented individuals they might not have otherwise considered for roles. All participants receive free enrolment in BioTalent Canada’s suite of Essential Skills and Technical Skills training courses and, upon completion, gain access to the BioSkills Recognition Program. To learn more visit biotalent.ca/skillednewcomers .

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220123005019/en/

logo

Contacts

Media Inquiries

Siobhan Williams
Director, Marketing and Communications
BioTalent Canada
613-235-1402 ext. 229
swilliams@biotalent.ca

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Minister Of The Economy Franz Fayot On Luxembourg’s Transition Towards A Green Economy – Forbes

Published

 on


Just last week, Luxembourg’s Minister of the Economy, Franz Fayot, came to the cities of Toronto and Montreal as part of an economic mission organized by the Luxembourg Chamber of Commerce in close cooperation with the Ministry of the Economy. I had the opportunity to sit down with Minister Fayot at the InterContinental Toronto Centre, and get some insights into the Grand-Duchy’s economic transition towards sustainability.

A transitioning economy

With up to one-third of its GDP related to the finance sector, Luxembourg’s economy is widely dominated by the financial sector. However, the past 20 years have been characterized by a push for economic diversification, and increased transparency and regulations following the financial crisis, said Minister Fayot.

“What we are trying to do is diversify [the economy] even more into new sectors to make us less dependent on the financial sector and adaptable to new circumstances,” he said. “We are also more and more developing a green finance sustainable finance sector, which is doing very well.”

A green state responsibility

Minister Fayot, whose guiding principles are a strong welfare state and sustainability, firmly believes that the government must assume its pivotal role in shifting the economy towards sustainability — “both in terms of environmental sustainability, but also social sustainability,” he added.

In June 2020, an international consultation was launched to gather strategic spatial planning project ideas considering the climate-related challenges and social issues, and support for the country’s ecological transition towards a zero-carbon territory by 2050.

“We need to understand that we have to help businesses innovate, and invest in the future,” said Minister Fayot.

A rising startup ecosystem

Luxembourg has seen a steady growth in startups over the past decade.

Earlier this year, the Ministry of the Economy launched a strategic initiative aimed at providing a thorough understanding of the startup ecosystem based on data analysis and interviews with key stakeholders.

Luxinnovation, the national innovation agency, identified over 500 active startups offering innovative digital and data-driven solutions in its latest mapping.

These assessments will also provide relevant comparisons with international markets, and aim to identify the necessary next steps for development opportunities in the upcoming years.

“Our innovation agency is there to guide startups, but also other more established businesses, to get access to grants,” explained Minister Fayot. “We have a state aid framework in Europe which we have to comply with, but the main message is that there is an obvious need to co-finance innovation, particularly in times when we are in this transition towards a more green economy.”

Going above the limits of territory

Surrounded by Belgium, France and Germany, Luxembourg is one of the smallest countries in the world — slightly smaller than Rhode Island. Yet, despite its dependence on its neighboring countries’ energy supplies, it is making continuous efforts to increase its share of renewable energy by also investing in projects across its borders, said Minister Fayot.

“We don’t have that much sun in Luxembourg, and we don’t have an unlimited space to build wind power,” he said. “It’s a bit of a limiting factor, but it shouldn’t excuse anything.”

“We are investing a lot into energy efficiency,” he added. “We are trying to get people to e-mobility and pushing for geothermal heating and energy in new constructions.”

A growing space sector

Luxembourg might not be the first to come to mind when we think of space, but, the country owns one of the world-leading satellite operators, and is increasing its investment into space resources.

“The SpaceResources.lu is an initiative that we launched about six years ago, and it is very much focused on the space resources segment of the space industry,” he said. “We are not launching anything in space out of Luxembourg, but focusing on services like space traffic management.”

As part of the economic mission, a group of space companies participated in a distinctive program set up by the Luxembourg Space Agency in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency. This included on-site company visits, workshops and B2B opportunities that led to the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the two national space agencies.

Stephanie Ricci contributed to this story.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Edmonton needs a nighttime economic strategy, industry advocates say – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Edmonton’s nighttime entertainment and hospitality venues need more support if the city is going to host big events like the Juno Awards next year, industry advocates say. 

At a meeting Wednesday, venue operators and business associations called on city councillors and administration to create a special office or person to directly support the nighttime industry. 

Puneeta McBryan, executive director of the Downtown Business Association, said the city’s existing economic development staff are overstretched on daytime operations alone, and said that nighttime industries need help. 

“Dedicated resources to this are absolutely essential,” McBryan told council’s executive committee. “We’re losing venues. If we haven’t already lost them, we’re at risk of losing them.”

McBryan said that potential gap in venues concerns her as Edmonton gets ready to host the Juno Awards next year. 

“I’m frankly really nervous about how many off-site venues we even have to host music events anymore, in our downtown,” she said. 

Ward papastew Coun. Michael Janz said he supports the idea of a nighttime economic office and echoed McBryan’s concerns about whether Edmonton will have sufficient spaces for the Junos next year. 

“One of the best parts about the Junos is not the awards, it’s the three weeks before and three weeks after when all the visiting artists are coming in and jamming out,” Janz said. 

Brent Oliver, a venue programmer and former manager of several music venues in Edmonton, spoke to the committee about the Junos, and said the event needs about a dozen spaces.

“It will likely be a stretch to try and get 11 or 12 venues at this point, and to try and also keep it walkable, I think is very important, which would mean trying to stay downtown,” he said. 

Dedicated office would help: advocates

Oliver also made the case to councillors for a designated nighttime economic office and strategy.

“Currently venues like the Starlite Room, theatres like the Citadel, bars and pubs along Jasper Ave. have to jump through various municipal and provincial departments to get permits, approvals, city support, enforcement and licensing,” he said.

He suggested a nighttime economy approach for the arts, sport and hospitality sectors would help businesses navigate issues around operating after work hours. 

“Our industry provides so much for Edmontonians and tourism, as well as a significant economic impact on the city,” he said. 

Organizers of music festivals, outdoor beer gardens and markets operating outside business hours have no one to call if there are last-minute or unforeseen questions in operating the event, McBryan said.

Oliver said after-hours issues became more obvious during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“Many of my colleagues were left having to speak directly to city council members and elected officials to address issues of funding, safety and support,” he said.

Councillors directed city administration to report back ahead of the 2023-2026 budget cycle in the fall with a model to support the nighttime economy, and consider a designated person like a night mayor, as one of the potential options. 

Mayor Amarjeet Sohi acknowledged the need to develop the nighttime economy as part of a thriving city in entertainment, arts and culture. 

“And having more eyes on the street in the evening, on the weekends,” Sohi told reporters outside the meeting. “It is important that we have dedicated resources to support the growth of that sector.”

The Alberta government has recently allowed municipalities to create “entertainment districts” within a city, where there could be a suspension of open liquor laws, McBryan said. 

Other cities have nightlife economic strategies, a city report shows. 

Toronto has a nightlife action plan and the deputy mayor on council is the night economy ambassador, while Ottawa is developing a plan. 

Abroad, New York has a night mayor and Pittsburgh has a nighttime economy manager as well as action teams to address nighttime activities in public safety, hospitality, development, transportation, and personal accountability.

London, England, has an extensive strategy that includes a Night Czar, a post-pandemic plan with recommendations on visas, training, creative hubs, safety, and licensing, and a women’s night safety charter. 

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Copper Sinks Toward $8000 in Bleak Signal for Global Economy – Bloomberg

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Copper Sinks Toward $8000 in Bleak Signal for Global Economy  Bloomberg



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending