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New-onset type 2 diabetes risk higher with mild COVID-19 vs. other respiratory infections – Healio

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March 17, 2022

2 min read

Disclosures:
Rathmann reports that the study received funding from the German Federal Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Culture and Science of the State of North Rhine–Westphalia.

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Adults who have a mild case of COVID-19 are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who had an acute upper respiratory infection, according to findings from Germany published in Diabetologia.

“Recent studies raised the possibility that SARS-CoV-2 can cause diabetes,” Wolfgang Rathmann, MSPH, professor of epidemiology and deputy director of the Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany, told Healio. “However, there is a lack of studies investigating the incidence of diabetes after COVID-19 in mild cases. To provide more evidence, we analyzed electronic health records from general and internal medicine practices across Germany. We found that new cases of type 2 diabetes were more common in patients who tested positive for COVID-19 than those with an acute upper respiratory infection. This means that the relative risk of developing type 2 diabetes in mild COVID-19 cases was 28% higher than in patients with upper respiratory infections, which are also mainly caused by viruses.”

Wolfgang Rathmann, MSPH
Rathmann is a professor of epidemiology and deputy director of the Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Rathmann and colleagues conducted a retrospective study analyzing data from adults with newly diagnosed COVID-19 in the Disease Analyzer electronic health care database in Germany. Adults with an initial COVID-19 diagnosis between March 2020 and January 2021 and without a previous diabetes diagnosis were included. Those with COVID-19 were matched by sex, age, health insurance coverage, diagnosis month and comorbidities with a control group of adults with acute upper respiratory infection.

There were 35,865 adults diagnosed with COVID-19 included in the analysis (mean age, 42.6 years; 45.6% women). The COVID-19 group had a higher rate of new-onset type 2 diabetes compared with the control group (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.05-1.57). There were no increased rates of other forms of diabetes between the two groups.

In a sensitivity analysis, 9,823 people with a COVID-19 diagnosis were matched with controls who had at least one COVID-19 test, but never tested positive. In this group, rates of new-onset type 2 diabetes were significantly higher in those with COVID-19 compared with the control group (IRR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.05-2.18).

“COVID-19 infection may lead to diabetes by upregulation of the immune system after remission, which may induce pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance,” Rathmann said. “Insulin resistance is when cells in muscles, fat and liver do not respond well to insulin and cannot easily take up glucose from the blood. In addition, some COVID-19 patients may have been at risk for developing diabetes due to having obesity or prediabetes, and the stress related to COVID-19 accelerated this process.”

Rathmann said most people with a mild form of COVID-19 will not develop diabetes, but those who are recovered should be aware of their increased risk.

“We recommend that anyone who has recovered from COVID-19 be aware of the warning signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as fatigue, frequent urination and increased thirst, and seek treatment right away,” Rathmann said. “If confirmed, the present study indicates that diabetes screening in people who recovered even from mild COVID-19 should be recommended.”

For more information:

Wolfgang Rathmann, MSPH, can be reached at rathmann@ddz.de.

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2SLGBTQ+ lobby group head speaks on the trauma of conversion therapy

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Although conversion therapy has now been outlawed in Canada, many are still victims causing them to go through a lot of trauma in the process.

According to Jordan Sullivan, Project Coordinator of Conversion Therapy Survivors Support and Survivors of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression Change Efforts (SOGIECE), survivors of conversion therapy identify the need for a variety of supports including education and increased awareness about SOGIECE and conversion practices.

Also needed is access to affirming therapists experienced with SOGIECE, trauma (including religious trauma), safe spaces and networks, and access to affirming healthcare practitioners who are aware of conversion therapy or SOGIECE and equipped to support survivors.

“In January of 2021 when I was asked to be the project coordinator, I was hesitant because I wasn’t sure that my experience could be classified as SOGIECE or conversion therapy. I never attended a formalized conversion therapy program or camp run by a religious organization. Healthcare practitioners misdiagnosed me or refused me access to care.

In reality, I spent 27 years internalizing conversion therapy practices through prayer, the study of religious texts, disassociation from my body, and suppression or denial of my sexual and gender identities. I spent six years in counselling and change attempts using conversion therapy practices. I came out as a lesbian at age 33, and as a Trans man at age 51. I am now 61 and Queerly Heterosexual, but I spent decades of my life hiding in shame and fear and struggled with suicidal ideation until my mid-30s.

At times I wanted to crawl away and hide, be distracted by anything that silenced the emptiness, the pain, the wounds deep inside. I realized that in some ways, I am still more comfortable in shame, silence, and disassociation, than in any other way of being and living, but I was also filled with wonderment at the resiliency and courage of every single one of the participants.

However, many of us did not survive, choosing to end the pain and shame through suicide. Many of us are still victims in one way or another, still silenced by the shame, still afraid of being seen as we are. Still, many of us are survivors, and while it has not been an easy road, many of us are thrivers too,” said Jordan.

In addition, Jordan said conversion practices and programs are not easily defined or identified, and often capture only a fragment of pressures and messages that could be considered SOGIECE.

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Some in B.C. cross U.S. border for their next COVID-19 vaccine – Global News

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Global News Hour at 6 BC

There is evidence of the lengths some British Columbians will go to get a second booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine — crossing the border to Point Roberts, WA for a shot. The movement comes thanks to the different approach to the fourth shot south of the border. Catherine Urquhart reports.

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Unknown hepatitis in children: Will it become a pandemic too? – CGTN

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03:56

The number of cases of a mysterious acute hepatitis in children continues to increase worldwide, with most cases occurring in Europe. As of May 10, 348 suspected cases had been reported in at least 20 countries. Information and data have pointed to an adenovirus called adenovirus-41 (HAdV-41) as the possible culprit. Does it have anything to do with COVID? Will it become a pandemic? How do we protect ourselves from it?

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