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New study suggests icebergs may not have sunk the Titanic eventually – haveeruonline

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="From Popular Mechanics” data-reactid=”32″>From popular mechanics

  • The new paper has solar flare activity Contribute to sinking of giant.
  • Sun Emits a huge solar storm It can even cut off power on Earth.
  • The correct (wrong) type of solar flare may have hindered your navigation. and Radio, affecting giantTrajectory and structure correspondence.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Just when we think we know everything there is to know about the Titanic—unsinkable ship, giant iceberg, "I’m the king of the world," etc.—along comes fascinating new research that raises big questions about what really transpired on the fateful night of April 14, 1912. Did a weather fluke from space actually cause the Titanic to sink?
” data-reactid=”37″>When you think you know everything we need to know giantIt comes with exciting new research that raises big questions about what really happened on the fateful night of April 14, 1912, including an irremovable ship, a huge iceberg, and “I’m the King of the World.” Weather coincidence from space in reality giant Sinking?

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="🚢 You love badass ships. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.” data-reactid=”38″>🚢 You like bad belly. We do too. Let’s bother them together.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The new study's key finding is that the northern hemisphere was in the grips of a “moderate to severe” magnetic storm that night, which could have altered the Titanic’s navigational readings, affecting both its planned course and the information the crew shared about their location during SOS signals.” data-reactid=”43″>The key finding of the new study was that the Northern Hemisphere was in the grip of a “middle to severe” magnetic storm that night. giantExplore readings of affecting all planned courses and Information shared by the crew about their location during the SOS signal.

The idea is very simple. The sun is covered with sunspots, powered by an innate nuclear generator that burns at millions of degrees. These, in turn, are distinguished by massive explosions over the size of the Earth, i.e. solar flares.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“In a matter of just a few minutes they heat material to many millions of degrees and release as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT,” NASA explains. These flares are often caused by magnetic changes or crashes, and their explosions cause magnetic ripples through the solar system.” data-reactid=”45″>“In just a few minutes, it heats the material to millions of degrees and releases as much energy as billions of megatons of TNT.” NASA explains. These flares are often caused by magnetic changes or collisions, and explosions cause magnetic ripples through the solar system.

It is intuitively understandable that the hottest things in the solar system swirl and experience extreme responses to a changing magnetic field. One of the reasons Earth is a successful habitat for life is that humans have a protective magnetic field that reflects huge amounts of solar radiation and cosmic winds. Otherwise, it will blow us to the surface of a planet like the bald, lifeless Mars.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This magnetic field also shifts and changes over time, especially as the magnetic poles move around Earth’s surface. Both animals and humans have learned to rely on the magnetic poles, in the form of manmade devices like compasses as well as animals’ sense for migration and navigation. Compasses, like clocks, must be adjusted to the correct units—like accounting for magnetic north as it moves around in a normal way.” data-reactid=”47″>This magnetic field moves and changes over time, especially as the stimulus moves around the Earth’s surface. Both animals and humans have learned to rely on stimuli in the form of artificial devices such as compasses. Animal sense of movement and navigation. A compass like a watch should be adjusted in the correct units as follows: Explain magnetic north It moves in the normal way.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="It’s here that we rejoin the Titanic. Paper author Mila Zinkova has published four previous papers about the Titanic in the journal RMetS Weather, exploring a theory that mirages or other visual distortions played a part in the sinking. Now, Zinkova is using weather and space data to explore a different theory.” data-reactid=”48″>Here we are again giant. Paper author Mila Zinkova said Published 4 previous papers on giant In the journal RMetS Weather, A mirage, or other visual distortion contributed to the sinking. Now Zinkova is exploring other theories using weather and space data.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If a solar flare is severe enough, marked on that historic night by the telltale Aurora Borealis, it can skew the Earth’s magnetic field and wreak havoc with magnetic instruments like compasses. Even today, solar flares interfere with the electrical grid and space traffic, and truly precious file backups may be kept in protective Faraday cages.” data-reactid=”49″>If the solar flare is severe enough, and marked by Aurora Borealis on that historic night, it can distort the Earth’s magnetic field and cause confusion with magnetic devices like compasses. Even today, solar flares disrupt power grids and space traffic, and prevent valuable file backups. Can be stored in a protective Faraday cage..

Photo courtesy: Paramount-20th Century Fox

Photo courtesy: Paramount-20th Century Fox

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Zinkova posits that the impact on compasses affected the coordinates reported in distress signals. “The Titanic’s Fourth Officer Joseph Boxhall worked out the ship’s SOS position. Boxhall’s position was around 13 nautical miles (24 km) off their real position,” Zinkova writes.” data-reactid=”70″>Zinkova assumes that the effect on the compass affects the coordinates reported in the distress signal. “that much Titanic 4th Joseph Box Hall located the ship’s SOS. Boxhall’s location was about 24 kilometers (13 nautical miles) from its actual location,” wrote Zinkova.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="But the rescue ship Carpathia likely had the same wrong information. “The compasses of the Carpathia could have been under the influence of the geomagnetic storm for 5.5 hours, before and after she received the Titanic’s SOS, and until she reached the lifeboats,” Zinkova continues. “Therefore, a possible combined compass error could have been one of the factors that contributed to the successful rescue of the Titanic survivors.”” data-reactid=”71″>But the rescue ship Carpathian You probably have the exact same misinformation. “Carpathia’s compass may have been affected by a geomagnetic storm. giantUntil she gets to the lifeboat, Zinkova continues. So the possible combined compass error could be one of the factors that contributed to the successful rescue of the Titanic survivors.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This also points to how localized the solar flare phenomenon was. Ships in a certain radius received scrambled radio calls or missed them altogether. Back on land or even outside of the affected radius, everything seemed normal except when trying to contact or be contacted by the Titanic and other ships near it.” data-reactid=”72″>This also indicates how localized the solar flare phenomenon is. Vessels in a certain radius receive scrambled cordless calls or missed them all. Everything seemed normal, even when returning to land or outside the affected radius. giant And other ships nearby.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="You Might Also Like” data-reactid=”73″>You may also like

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B.C. Halloween forecast: Frightfully chilly under a spooky full moon – Vancouver Sun

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While the weather is expected to be frightfully cold in much of B.C. this Halloween, those who venture outdoors may be in for a treat.

A rare full “blue” moon is expected Saturday night, the second full moon this month.

The last time trick-or-treaters went out under a full moon in B.C. was in 2001, but the last Halloween full moon in all time zones was in 1944, according to the Farmer’s Almanac.

© Gideon Knight_Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Young Grand title young winner Featuring: The moon and the crow. Photo by CB2/ZOB /Gideon Knight/Wildlife Photograp

As for the weather, if you’re in Metro Vancouver it’s likely going to be clear and sunny during the day with a high of 11 C, and then partly cloudy at night with a low of 5 C, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Elsewhere in B.C., the Prince George and Williams Lake areas should see a mix of sun and cloud with a high of around 4 or 5 C and an overnight low of 2 C, while in the Okanagan it will likely be overcast and 10 C, dipping down to 4 C overnight with a slight chance of showers.

In the northern region of Dease Lake, the forecast looks for sunny during the day and freezing at night, plunging to minus 7 C overnight.

In the central B.C. region, some communities may have snow Saturday. The agency is forecasting a good chance of flurries in Smithers during the day but showers overnight.

ticrawford@postmedia.com

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Elusive and extremely rare catshark captured in amazing video – CNET

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This short-tail catshark (Parmaturus bigus), seen at the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, is a rare sight.


Schmidt Ocean video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Great whites might be the jumbo stars of the shark world, but there are some equally fascinating members on the other side of the size spectrum. The crew of the research vessel Falkor experienced the wonders of the deep when it spotted “one of the rarest species of sharks in the world” during a recent Schmidt Ocean Institute mission.

Shark expert Will White with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science research agency, identified the short-tail catshark Parmaturus bigus from footage captured during an exploration of the Great Barrier Reef on Oct. 17. Falkor’s remotely operated submersible SuBastian got a good look at the big-eyed creature. 

Though you can chill out and enjoy the hours of underwater footage and scientific commentary, the shark appears a little over two hours into this video. “It’s a shark!” the scientists comment as they zoom in.

Researchers have collected only one specimen of Parmaturus bigus, which is held in the Australian National Fish Collection. The one spotted lounging on the sand was a male estimated to be around 20 inches (50 cm) long. The remotely operated vehicle was able to follow it as it swam off.

Even better, the ocean researchers discovered they had filmed another specimen during a dive back in May but hadn’t identified it at the time. The team also found footage of an egg case from the short-tail catshark, giving scientists a wealth of new information about the species and its habitat.

“Through the efforts of the Falkor team, we now have three more records of one of the world’s rarest sharks,” Schmidt Ocean said in a statement Monday, including “the first footage of a living specimen.”

Schmidt Ocean expeditions have gifted us some extraordinary views of the marvels of the deep in recent years, from a stunningly bizarre siphonophore to a wild “benthic tornado.” The catshark fits in beautifully with this impressive track record of discovery.

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'One of the rarest species of shark in the world' captured in amazing video – CNET

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This short-tail catshark (Parmaturus bigus), seen at the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, is a rare sight.


Schmidt Ocean video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Great whites might be the jumbo stars of the shark world, but there are some equally fascinating members on the other side of the size spectrum. The crew of the research vessel Falkor experienced the wonders of the deep when it spotted “one of the rarest species of sharks in the world” during a recent Schmidt Ocean Institute mission.

Shark expert Will White with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science research agency, identified the short-tail catshark Parmaturus bigus from footage captured during an exploration of the Great Barrier Reef on Oct. 17. Falkor’s remotely operated submersible SuBastian got a good look at the big-eyed creature. 

Though you can chill out and enjoy the hours of underwater footage and scientific commentary, the shark appears a little over two hours into this video. “It’s a shark!” the scientists comment as they zoom in.

Researchers have collected only one specimen of Parmaturus bigus, which is held in the Australian National Fish Collection. The one spotted lounging on the sand was a male estimated to be around 20 inches (50 cm) long. The remotely operated vehicle was able to follow it as it swam off.

Even better, the ocean researchers discovered they had filmed another specimen during a dive back in May but hadn’t identified it at the time. The team also found footage of an egg case from the short-tail catshark, giving scientists a wealth of new information about the species and its habitat.

“Through the efforts of the Falkor team, we now have three more records of one of the world’s rarest sharks,” Schmidt Ocean said in a statement Monday, including “the first footage of a living specimen.”

Schmidt Ocean expeditions have gifted us some extraordinary views of the marvels of the deep in recent years, from a stunningly bizarre siphonophore to a wild “benthic tornado.” The catshark fits in beautifully with this impressive track record of discovery.

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