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New way to enjoy Prairie Fusion Arts and Entertainment – The Beacon Herald

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The new art exhibit in the main gallery at Prairie Fusion Arts and Entertainment, (supplied photo)

By Lee Beaton

The world as we knew it has forever been changed by COVID-19. So many things we took for granted, like being able to go and visit our families, or travelling to different parts of the world are now clouded by the unknown of this pandemic. Many people and businesses have been forever changed. In February, I never imagined not going to work each day and seeing people in the art gallery or talking with people as they arrived to attend a concert in the Glesby Theatre. Unfortunately, our world came to a crashing halt on March 20. The last week for me was spent making sure that all ticket sales and events were on hold. So many events and programs were cancelled or postponed. When we left work to begin social isolation, the gallery looked desolate and abandoned, with no colourful art on the walls.

The art gallery is open by appointment, and it has been so nice to once again see colour and art on display in each of the galleries. A world without art would be a very cold and unfriendly place to be. Many of our visitors have expressed how they have found looking at, or creating art is soothing, calming and very therapeutic. The art exhibits can bring the viewer feelings of joy and happiness while giving you a small glimpse into the world of an artist. When an exhibit comes down it is sad to see it go, however, there is a new exhibit waiting to be installed that will speak to you in a different way.

Our day camps and summer art camps were very successful in many ways. The children who participated were eager to feed their creative sides and explore the various mediums and opportunities. For some, it was a chance to go out to a safe space and put the pandemic aside for the next few hours. There are many ways that we can fuel and nurture our minds and bodies. We need food and water to live, but we also need activities to attend to our physical and mental health. Dance and Theatre offer individuals a chance to learn new skills while remaining active and creative. Visual Arts classes can foster our creative side while we adjust and learn fundamentals, and explore a variety of mediums.

COVID-19 is here and we need to learn to live with it and continue to grow and explore the various art forms. We have all been reacquainted with proper handwashing, covering our coughs and sneezes, physical distancing and staying home when we are ill. This is not an easy time right now but I hope that we can all work together to get through this. Here at the centre we have increased cleaning and sanitizing in high touch areas and have put measures in place to ensure proper social distancing, including limiting the number of participants.

Now when we work on plans for upcoming programs there is much more to consider. Our number one priority while offering creative outlets for people is to ensure we are following the recommended guidelines. With this in mind, the schedule for our fall art programs is subject to change due to the fluidity of COVID-19.

We continue to look to our community for support and ask for your help in maintaining our place as a vibrant jewel in the Central Region. Our organization’s income relies on ticket sales, rentals, and classes; much of which was terminated due to the pandemic. If you are able to make a gift by donation or sponsorship, we ask that you consider our organization so that we can come out of this stronger than ever, thanks to your generosity. Your support will make a difference for Prairie Fusion Arts & Entertainment and will be greatly appreciated.

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UBC Okanagan creativity on display at art gallery – Kelowna Capital News – Kelowna Capital News

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The Vernon Public Art Gallery opens to a brave new world of art-making with its upcoming exhibitions, featuring works by David and Jorden Doody as well as UBC Okanagan printmaking students.

The Doodys’ Electric Sleep is a collaborative sculptural installation that incorporates re-purposed, ready-made objects with hand-built sculptural elements juxtaposed with today’s screen culture.

“David and Jorden Doody work collaboratively to create their sculptural installations, which often are difficult to decode or get a hint of what the narrative might be. Their sculptural practice’s basic premise is to contrast the three-dimensional space we inhabit with the virtual reality apprehended on a screen,” gallery curator Lubos Culen said.

​Both UBC Okanagan alumni, David and Jorden graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2008. David went on to receive his Master of Fine Arts degree from Montreal’s Concordia University in 2017 and is now a sessional lecturer at UBCO, teaching drawing, painting, sculpture, and, most recently, mural art.

Jorden is currently pursuing her MFA at UBCO and has her work on display in the solo exhibition, I Must be Streaming, at the Kelowna Art Gallery.

Together, they commit to experimenting and improvising to create more accessible works by examining the contextual underpinning of various interesting juxtapositions of sculptural elements, Culen says.

“When viewing or experiencing the Doodys’ work, one inevitably ponders the materials and their use, as they are varied and often inconsistent with the objects’ re-purposed signifiers. The works are situated in a flux of screen culture and the omnipresence and proliferation of images, which are immaterial yet representational of three-dimensional archetypes. In contrast, the Doodys’ sculptures often borrow the aesthetics of images seen on various devices. Still, they manufacture the three-dimensional assemblages that mimic the appearance of images seen on a screen.”

Along with the Doodys’ Electric Sleep, the gallery will show The Repeatable Image: Printmaking at UBCO, which consists of prints created by current fine arts students in UBCO’s Department of Creative Studies.

Produced by traditional and modern methods, including relief prints, intaglio, lithography, and screenprinting, the prints cover various subject matter from questions surrounding the landscape and environmental stewardship, to the human condition, to formal abstract structures.

“Some have used ultraviolet light screenprinting, which uses non-toxic materials to produce highly detailed prints,” said Culen.

Both exhibitions open at the gallery Thursday, Oct. 8 and run to Dec. 22. Please note that there will be no opening reception due to COVID-19 health and safety regulations.

The VPAG is also now receiving applications to its annual members’ exhibition, Exposed!

“Members are at the core of the Vernon Public Art Gallery and Exposed!, our annual member’s exhibition, is one way that we can say thank you for their ongoing support,” executive director Dauna Kennedy said. “This exhibition is a mix of artworks from our membership. Some are established artists, and for others, it will be their first opportunity to display their work publicly. All works are available for sale, so it is a great opportunity to find a special Christmas gift while supporting local art.”

Exposed! opens Nov. 5 and continues to Dec. 22. Those who wish to submit artwork must be current VPAG members. The deadline for submissions is Oct. 28. Applications are available here through the Vernon Public Art Gallery website.

Gallery hours are Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

READ MORE: Museum offers a brief history of pandemics in the Okanagan

READ MORE: Okanagan artists showcase works at Vernon mall


@VernonNews
jennifer@vernonmorningstar.com

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New exhibits at the Vernon Public Art Gallery open Oct. 8. (Contributed)

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PHOTOS: Celebrating art and community during a pandemic – Revelstoke Review

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Though LUNA Nocturnal Art & Wonder was rescheduled to 2021 due to COVID-19 restrictions, the team put together LUNA RE-IMAGINED to celebrate art in a pandemic friendly way.

On Friday, Sept. 25, a small number of guests saw a live show at the Roxy Theatre featuring Leila Neverland, and three films, including one by local filmmaker Francois Desrosiers.

The event was streamed live for all to see.

The next day, six new pieces that will permanently live in Revelstoke’s Art Alleries, were revealed. Musicians played the alleyways throughout the day.

READ MORE: Creating accessible art in unusual places

READ MORE: Photographer Bruno Long introduces A Friend of a Friend

On Sunday, Sept. 27, the four artists discussed their works of art and people were invited to make squares for the Climate Action Quilt project, in a LUNA Studio-ish event.

READ MORE: Revelstoke students sewing giant quilt for climate action


 

@JDoll_Revy
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com

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Revisiting memory at the "…fire and frost" art exhibit in SUB – The Gateway Online

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As we head into fall, I once again remember how quietly the trees forget their leaves in an exhale of colour. I remember the ground in a pool of yellow when I told my partner I loved him for the first time. I remember finding out I could order pumpkin spice lattes year-round.

While these recollections may seem minuscule, we are all a collection of “I remembers.” Our brains serve as our own personal wizards, cataloging and discarding events at the touch of a synapse. Our memories are sacred. They are stored time. 

Those memories are the theme of ...fire and frost, a partnership between The Art Gallery of Alberta, Alberta Foundation for the Arts, and University of Alberta Students’ Union on exhibit at the Myer Horowitz Theatre from now until September 30, and at Concordia University from October 8 to November 4. The exhibit is curated by Shane Golby and features three contemporary artists: Colin Smith, Linda Craddock, and Candace Makowichuk

Cody Shimizu

I visited the exhibit earlier and let me tell you, the work is deep, and not your one-in-the morning-stoner-revelation-deep. It is physically deep in that I found myself enveloped within the places the artwork took me. When I stood in front of Craddock’s oil and photo collage Embarkation #5 1944, I felt like I was dusting off my memories, like my first fall romance. Or how I felt a longing to be a kid again when viewing Makowichuk’s bromoil photograph, Waiting: The Playground Is Closed Series. The act of recalling my memories felt like a tribute to my past. 

Cody Shimizu

I was most moved by Colin Smith’s photography on paper, Piapot School. In it you find an empty classroom, with the exception of a desk flipped on its side, a blank chalkboard with a scribble on it, and a peeling soccer ball on the floor. Outside lies an upside down projection of a deserted basketball court. There is however no learning taking place there, no one to play soccer with, and there is not even a basketball to play with on the court. Viewing Piapot School was like viewing a school memory without the two subjects that made it important: academics and the people. The experience was at once contemplative and haunting. 

Cody Shimizu

On Gil Scott-Heron’s final album I’m New Here there’s a verse that says, “No matter how far gone you’ve gone, you can always turn around.” The process of “turning around” is essential to what makes us human. Our memory is a knitted scarf we wear, each memory a stitch building off of the last one. In the presence of the pieces in the …fire and frost exhibit I unraveled the threads of my own personal history.

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