Connect with us

Sports

NHL eyeing short-term hubs to minimize risks for 2020-21 season – Sportsnet.ca

Published

 on


As the 2020-21 NBA season begins to take shape — with the league and NBPA agreeing early Tuesday to an amended CBA, key dates and a Dec. 22 tipoff — details about the next NHL campaign remain fuzzy.

But on Tuesday, league commissioner Gary Bettman offered some insight into how the NHL might operate safely amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

During a virtual panel at the Paley International Council Summit, Bettman said, per NHL.com’s Nicholas Cotsonika, the league hasn’t ruled out having teams play in their own arenas — with or without fans depending on local circumstances — but is also exploring the possibility of short-term hubs, with teams subbing in and out for action over the course of 10 to 12 days, or some sort of “hybrid system.”

“You’ll play a bunch of games without travelling. You’ll go back, go home for a week, be with your family. We’ll have our testing protocols and all the other things you need,” said Bettman.

“It’s not going to be quite as effective as a bubble, but we think we can, if we go this route, minimize the risks to the extent practical and sensible. And so that’s one of the things that we’re talking about.”

An obvious impediment to the NHL’s plans, whatever they may be, will be the closure of the U.S.-Canada border to nonessential travel, not to mention restrictions across state lines. But the solution may be in the temporary realignment of teams based on proximity.

“Obviously, we’re not going to move all seven Canadian franchises south of the 49th parallel, and so we have to look at alternative ways to play,” said Bettman. “And while crossing the U.S.-Canadian border is an issue, we’re also seeing within the United States limitations in terms of quarantining when you go from certain states to other states. It’s again part of having to be flexible. …

“As it relates to the travel issue, which is obviously the great unknown, we may have to temporarily realign to deal with geography, and that may make sense, because having some of our teams travel from Florida to California may not make sense.

“It may be that we’re better off, particularly if we’re playing a reduced schedule, which we’re contemplating, keeping it geographically centric, more divisional based, and realigning, again on a temporary basis, to deal with the travel issues.”

Bettman previously said the league is targeting a Jan. 1 puck drop for the upcoming season. The NBA, which is slated to begin a week earlier, is running a 72-game campaign.

One thing that is for certain, though, is that there will be no repeat of the bubbles that the NHL used over the summer in Edmonton and Toronto to complete the 2019-20 season.

As Bettman emphasized, all these changes are “temporary” and the hope is for a return to normalcy for the 2021-22 season.

“And while we’re in the middle of working on our return to play as well, which I hope to have put to bed soon, our goal is to get back to a normal schedule starting (next) fall and being done before July on a longer-term basis. That is the goal.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

The Most Exciting Canadian Sports Markets To Bet On In 2020

Published

 on

Canadian Sports

What is more exciting than watching your favourite team play. The anticipation of win and the excitement of gameplay is one of the reasons why sports fans are so enthusiastic onto only during the game itself but in the lead up to games, in-between seasons and pretty much in general.

Placing a bet on your favourite sport can make things a lot more interesting, and many people choose to be on the outcome of different sporting markets, either in person or via online gaming methods. Online casino bonuses can help you enhance your gameplay when betting on the different sports markets in Canada.

The Best Sports Markets in Canada to Use Casino Bonuses On

So when it comes to choosing the best sports markets to bet on in Canada, it is safe to say there is a wide variety of sports that offer you an exciting option when it comes to sports betting. When you think of Canada, most people automatically think of Hockey. And while this can be a thrilling option when it comes to placing your best, many other sports open up the market and offer you different betting options.

WHL Betting

The Western Hockey League boasts some of the best players in North America. With some of the best in their field, this market can offer you some of the best options when it comes to betting on live and upcoming matches. One of the defining characteristics of hockey is its unpredictability meaning you never know what will happen. This is what makes it one of the most exciting betting markets in Canada.

King of The Cage

Featuring some of the best up and coming MMA fighters before they hit the UFC, betting on this market will give you the chance to see some of the best new fighters in their sport. As such, the outcome can be anyone’s match, meaning you get one of the best markets to bet on when choosing to bet on King of The Cage matches.

Esports

Esports or electronic sports is becoming an increasingly popular form of entertainment. The winner of the most recent 2019 championship took home a whopping $2.5 million in prize money. Betting on esports is simple. All you need to do is to open a sportsbook account and deposit money, and you can benefit from some huge pay-outs associated with the esports betting markets.

Soccer

Soccer is one of the most popular sports worldwide. With so many different leagues and tournaments around the world along with the MLS and CFL, the possibilities are endless when it comes to choosing new and different sports markets to place your bets on. From homegrown matches to far-flung teams and the upcoming 2022 Fifa World Cup, soccer remains a fascinating and popular market for sports bets along with one of the worlds most beloved sports.

Choosing The Most Exciting Canadian Sports Betting Markets

With so many options to choose from placing a bet has never been easier. Many Canadian betting sites offer different markets for Canadian teams and across the world. Whether you are placing a bet on your favorite team or looking for a new sport to follow or market to explore, have a look around before you place your bet to see what the market can offer to make your sports experience more thrilling and satisfying to watch.

Continue Reading

Sports

50-something Mike Tyson, Roy Jones Jr. hungry to fight again – CTV News

Published

 on


LOS ANGELES —
Mike Tyson stepped onto a spotlighted stage Friday and weighed in at 220 pounds, ripping off his shirt to reveal a muscled torso that could belong to an athlete of half his 54 years.

The former heavyweight champion moved into a COVID-protective glass box and went nose-to-nose with Roy Jones Jr., once the most talented fighter in the world. Jones’ 210-pound frame was slightly less toned, but still clearly in better condition than most of his fellow 51-year-olds.

These two boxing greats are older, calmer men now, but they’re returning to the ring Saturday night intending to recapture a moment of their brilliant past — and they’ve both worked very hard to make sure they won’t be embarrassed in this extraordinary boxing exhibition.

“This is the fun part,” said Tyson, who will fight for the first time in 15 years. “Everything else to get here was hell.”

Their fight at Staples Center is an eight-round sparring session of sorts. It will have two-minute rounds, no official judging and limited violence, although the limit depends on whether you’re asking the California State Athletic Commission or the fighters, who both intend to let their hands go.

“Maybe I don’t know how to go easy,” Tyson said. “I don’t know. I don’t want to say the wrong thing. I don’t want the commission mad at me.”

But for Tyson and Jones, this unique pay-per-view show is less of a sporting event and more of a chance for two transcendent athletes to prove age is a number — and aging is a choice.

“I don’t look at life as age,” Tyson said. “I look at life as energy. You don’t bring your age to the table. You bring your energy to the table. You don’t go meet people: `Hey, I’m Bob. I’m 59.’ You don’t do that.”

Tyson still seems surprised by the wave of events that carried him back to the ring. He admits the younger Tyson never would have believed he would be a middle-aged husband and father who needed to lose 100 pounds two years ago, because that headstrong kid from Brooklyn had never thought that far ahead.

“I didn’t even think I would live this long,” he said. “I was just so intense, and just took myself so serious.”

Tyson got back into shape at the urging of his wife, who got him to start doing 15 minutes a day on the treadmill. The 15 minutes turned into two hours, and then expanded to biking, running and eventually punching, along with the adoption of a vegan diet.

“Never eat anything,” he said with a laugh. “Just starve and exercise.”

The momentum started when he posted video of a training session on social media early in the coronavirus pandemic, and his crisp, powerful punches led to millions of impressions and a subsequent stream of increasingly lucrative comeback offers, along with the chance to raise money for charities.

“This is a part of my life that I had pretty much thrown away,” Tyson said. “My last fight, I didn’t have any interest in doing it. I’m interested in doing it now.”

Tyson is referring to his loss to journeyman Kevin McBride in 2005, when he finally wrapped up his singular career in ugly fashion. He became the heavyweight champion at 20 and reigned over the division for five years, but his epic downfall soured him on the sport.

“I want to do it now,” Tyson said. “Most of the time I was obligated to do it from a contract perspective: `If you don’t do this, we’ll take everything you have, and you’ll be back in Brownsville.’ They were blackmailing me. It’s a different perspective now.”

While Tyson became an international icon for his brutish, dangerous image and numerous misbehaviours, Jones was widely revered as perhaps the most skilled boxer of his generation. Jones was a preternaturally gifted athlete who dominated his weight classes while still pursuing his passion for basketball.

Nate Robinson was a rookie guard for the Knicks in 2005 when Jones participated in a full practice with the team.

“I was freaking out,” said the 36-year-old Robinson, no stranger to freakish athletic feats as a three-time winner of the NBA Slam Dunk contest at 5-foot-9. “That was one of the highlights of my life, to be able to rub shoulders and hoop with one of your favourite boxers.”

Jones fought regularly throughout the 2010s, but thought he was finally retired two years ago. When he got an offer to be the opponent in Tyson’s comeback, Jones couldn’t resist the chance to fight a legend he never got to meet during a career spent mostly at light heavyweight.

So Jones embarked on his own comeback training regimen.

“It’s been the craziest thing you ever could have imagined,” Jones said. “I can’t believe I’m able to maintain my speed at 51 years old. I’m still faster than 95% of the boxing world, and it shocks me. The aches and pains are there because you’re 50, and they’re going to be there no matter what you do. You just have to have a mental strength to overcome an adversity.”

Tyson and Jones are returning to a new world of boxing fandom and consumption. This show is being promoted by Triller, a video-making app and social media platform, with a fight-night show featuring performances by several rappers, a surprisingly solid undercard and a co-main event pitting Robinson in his professional boxing debut against YouTube star Jake Paul.

Robinson and Paul both seem appropriately awed by the circumstances of their bout.

“You’ve got to remember, I’m 23, and this is the first time that people my age will be able to experience a Mike Tyson fight live,” Paul said. “I can’t believe I’m a part of it.”

Neither Tyson nor Jones is likely done with boxing after this show. Jones said he hopes to fight mixed martial arts legend Anderson Silva next “if this one goes well,” while Tyson will go wherever this strange trip takes him next.

“Me being here is already a success,” Tyson said. “Me just existing as a human being is a success.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Scott Stinson: Blue Jays fans may not miss the Rogers Centre, but don't expect them to pay for replacement – National Post

Published

 on


Article content continued

Rogers Centre ‘s current owners bought the stadium for less than five per cent of its construction cost when it was just 15 years old. Photo by John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports

Could a similar scenario play out in Toronto? The specifics might be different but the end result the same: a big and complicated vision gets whittled down into more acceptable parts, and a lot of horse-trading ensues involving cost and land use and eventually a baseball stadium emerges at the end. Maybe it’s next to the Rogers Centre, maybe it’s somewhere else on the waterfront that is presently being imagined for better things.

The thing to remember as the process plays out is that Rogers has a baseball stadium that it already owns, and which it bought, at 15 years old, for less than five per cent of its construction cost. If it wants to replace it, that should be a project that is entirely up to Rogers management and its shareholders. The stadium gambit inevitably includes an appeal to public money to help with up-front costs, or tax breaks on the back end, or sweet land arrangements, or some combination of all three. Sure, that stuff benefits the team owners, but hey: New stadium! Outfield beer garden! Woo!

Already there are probably Blue Jays fans who are dreaming of a PNC Park North or an Oracle Park East — the lovely waterfront stadiums of Pittsburgh and San Francisco — and who would be fine if a few tax dollars went to that instead of filling potholes.

But that’s just the trap that the team owners set. Of course it would be nice if the Blue Jays replaced their fusty old dome. And if they do, the public should be willing to support it in one specific way, and one way only: by buying tickets.

• Email: sstinson@postmedia.com | Twitter:

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending