Connect with us

Art

Niagara Pumphouse Arts Centre to recoup pandemic losses with online art auctions – StCatharinesStandard.ca

Published

on


Niagara Pumphouse Arts Centre in Niagara-on-the-Lake is hoping to make up for its pandemic losses with two online art auctions.

Being held Aug. 17 to 31 and later in the fall, the auctions will feature 50 pieces of various media by artists across Ontario who answered an open call for submissions. They were chosen from 120 works.

Jurors were Canadian art specialist Geoffrey Joyner, artist and theatrical designer David Antschrl and Niagara Pumphouse Arts Centre exhibits chair Mark Skeffington.

Each auction will feature about 25 pieces, some donated outright to the centre and others to split their sales with the artists.

The August auction will feature work by artists lisuch aske Emily Andrews, Geoff Farnsworth, E. Robert Ross, Marilyn Cochrane, Julie Ponesse, Win Henstock and Robert Crosby.

“We understand that some people are still reluctant to visit an art gallery in person, even with extra safety precautions in place,” said Skeffington. “So, an online auction still allows people to engage and buy art, supporting artists and the centre.”

A Muskoka loveseat painted by Amy Ballett and a Muskoka chair painted by Elaine Bryck are also part of the auction.

“We are so thankful to the incredible artists who submitted so many high-quality art pieces,” said arts centre chairwoman Lise Andreana.

The Pumphouse will also host a solo exhibition by Niagara artist Beverley Barber Aug. 2 to 30, with a reception Aug. 2 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. It marks the venue’s first exhibition of the year. Tours of the centre’s recent renovation will also be held Aug. 2, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Earlier this year, the Pumphouse used a $143,500 Ontario Trillium Foundation grant for infrastructure improvements. Along with a new HVAC system and interior fittings, it upgraded accessibility for enhanced art programs at the Ricardo Street gallery.

Get more from the St. Catharines Standard in your inbox

Never miss the latest news from the St. Catharines Standard. Sign up for our email newsletters to get the day’s top stories, your favourite columnists, and much more in your inbox.

Sign Up Now

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Stonebridge Art Gallery opens in Wasaga Beach with works of 10 local painters – simcoe.com

Published

on


The Stonebridge Art Gallery, located in the heart of the Stonebridge Town Centre in Wasaga Beach, is now open to the public.

This ‘milestone’ event in the history of the Wasaga Society for the Arts (WSA) took place on Aug. 1 and was made possible by Stonebridge Town Centre’s Principal, Mark Crowe who generously donated the space to house the gallery and offices of the WSA.

WSA Chairman, Steven Wallace and Wasaga Beach Mayor Nina Bifolchi, in a display of public-private sector collaboration in promoting the arts in Wasaga Beach, together unveiled the signage. The symbolic gesture marked the simultaneous opening of both the Stonebridge Art Gallery and the WSA’s first exhibition of paintings.


Mr. Crowe, whom the WSA had planned to include in this symbolic gesture was unavoidably absent. Among others in attendance were Directors of the WSA and, from Town Hall, Deputy Mayor Sylvia Bray and Counsellors Joe Belanger and George Watson. Following the opening ceremony and well into the afternoon artists and members of the public visited the newly opened upper floor gallery where flautist Lesley Joosten set the mood with haunting, familiar melodies. Artists whose works are now on display include: Adele Derkowski, Karl Fuhre Sr., Tom Zimm, Jessalynn Sammons, Trevor Dring, Bruce Belford, Jayne Edwards, Earlene Martin, Mark Hope and Sue A. Miller.

The WSA Chairman, in his brief opening remarks, respectfully acknowledged that the event was taking place on aboriginal land that had been inhabited and cared for by indigenous peoples for centuries. He expressed gratitude to all generations of indigenous peoples for accommodating development on lands now administered by the Town of Wasaga Beach. He acknowledged and thanked Mark Crowe for his generosity and public spiritedness in providing space for human development.

“The WSA is an incorporated not-for-profit entity with charitable intent with a mission to advance the public’s appreciation of all disciplines and genres of the arts,” the WSA Chairman said. In this regard, he acknowledged with gratitude the presence and contribution of Wasaga Beach artist Sue A. Miller, the WSA’s Art Curator. “The Stonebridge Art Gallery is lucky to have Sue A. Miller (as its Art Curator),” Mr. Wallace said.

The current WSA exhibition of paintings by 10 local artists is open to the public throughout August 2020, on Thursdays and Saturdays from 1.00 pm to 4.00 pm. This inaugural exhibition ends with the auction of four paintings by one of Ontario’s renowned artists and late public servant, Paul Johns.

The Stonebridge Art Gallery, operated by the WSA, is located at the Stonebridge Town Centre, Wasaga Beach, at Suite #8,1 Market Lane, Wasaga Beach, ON L9Z 0B6.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Skeleton Park neighbourhood art project encourages rest of Kingston to follow their creative lead – Global News

Published

on


Limestone City, get creative.

That’s the challenge from Kingston’s Union Gallery. It comes on the heels of the very successful COVID-19-inspired Next Door: A Skeleton Park Neighbourhood Art Project.

There’s no doubt the 16 art installations scattered throughout the downtown area helped to brighten things up in these not so colourful times.

Read more:
How Kingston is doing good, staying connected during the coronavirus pandemic

Diane Black is a Kingston artist taking part in the project.

“They had big plans for the music festival and that obviously wasn’t going to happen, so what are they going to do to keep the neighbourhood sort of engaged with the artists that live here,” Black said.

Story continues below advertisement

“So I thought that this was a brilliant turn-around.”






5:41
Skeleton Park Arts Festival goes virtual


Skeleton Park Arts Festival goes virtual

And so do others. Black’s contribution is called “Schooling”. It’s acrylic on canvas draped across the front of her house. The “school” of fish in the piece is moving together, which the artist hopes will encourage viewers to reflect on how the community is moving together through a challenging time. Madelaine Nelson lives in the neighbourhood.

“It’s wonderful. During isolation and lockdown, people had all sorts of time of their hands all of a sudden and it’s great to know that people used it for creative means,” said Madelaine Nelson, a resident of the neighbourhood.

“Their life didn’t go on pause — it wasn’t on hold — they kept creating and kept the community thriving.”

Read more:
Kingston political, academic, economic forces team up to guide organizations through COVID-19

Story continues below advertisement

Skeleton Park’s Next Door project comes to a close on Aug. 17. Now, the Queen’s University-based Union Gallery wants the entire city to create and display works of art in front of their homes with “My Door YGK”. Carina Magazzeni is director at the gallery.

“A lot of the artists as a part of Next Door were very creative in their material approaches and we want it to be a project that anyone at any artistic level, experience can be a part of,” said Carina Magazzeni, the gallery’s director.

“So yes, become a part of My Door YGK.”

MORE:

Oscar Wilde once said imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Maybe the rest of the city can get creative just like those in the Skeleton Park area.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Fine art and face masks: London's Victoria and Albert Museum reopens – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Published

on


LONDON (Reuters) – Five thousand years of art and design history will be joined by some more modern items when London’s Victoria and Albert (V&A) museum reopens on Thursday – hand sanitiser dispensers and protective screens.

Mask-wearing visitors will be allowed to tour exhibits on two of the museum’s floors, strolling through 250 years of European Renaissance art, a dazzling Islamic Middle East gallery, and five centuries of fashion from around the world.

Tickets are free but visitors will be allowed in on a booking-only basis after months of coronavirus-enforced closure, marking another step in Britain’s tentative economic and cultural reopening.

“We want people to enjoy themselves again after all these months of looking at screens – to go and see an artefact for yourself, to stand in front of an object, that’s what’s so important,” said museum director Tristram Hunt.

“The V&A has been closed for 138 days, the longest period of closure in its history.”

The 160-year-old museum, named after Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert, has been modified to meet the demands of social distancing regulations designed to prevent the spread of a COVID-19 pandemic that has killed more than 46,000 people in Britain alone.

Hand sanitiser dispensers have been dotted around the sprawling, mosaic-floored building. The gift shop and cafe have been equipped with protective screens.

Further sections of the V&A’s seven miles of galleries will reopen in phases later in the month.

“What we’ve all discovered is that it’s relatively easy to close, but it’s a lot more difficult to reopen,” Hunt said.

“We’ve got the pubs open, we’ve got the football playing, that’s great. But museums, galleries, schools, places where people can nurture their souls is really important.”

(Reporting by Hanna Rantala; Writing by William James; Editing by Janet Lawrence)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending