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Nine-year-old tested for HIV after pricking himself at beach – Yahoo New Zealand News

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syringe sticking out of sand at a beach

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The nine-year-old was playing in the sand when he pricked himself with a discarded syringe. (PA)

A nine-year-old boy is awaiting test results for HIV after accidentally pricking himself with a discarded needle on Boscombe beach in Bournemouth.

The boy’s parents Dan and Ferne Spiller said that their son Clayton pulled his out of the sand and “had a dirty syringe in his finger” and were “gobsmacked” by how the Council’s beach ranger handled the situation.

Dan Spiller said that he sought the help of the beach ranger on the promenade, who was wearing a light blue t-shirt.

He asked the ranger what he can do, but the council official reportedly said he “didn’t know where the first aid box was”.

Spiller said: “I am just gobsmacked with how they took care of the situation.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“We live in Bournemouth and know the area very well, we go to the beach all the time,” he told the Daily Echo.” data-reactid=”37″>“We live in Bournemouth and know the area very well, we go to the beach all the time,” he told the Daily Echo.

He said he asked where the manager was but the ranger “couldn’t radio through to him,” Spiller said.

People enjoy the hot weather between Bournemouth beach and Boscombe beach in Dorset, following the introduction of measures to bring the country out of lockdown.People enjoy the hot weather between Bournemouth beach and Boscombe beach in Dorset, following the introduction of measures to bring the country out of lockdown.

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A nine-year-old boy has been tested for HIV after accidentally pricking himself with a needle on Boscombe beach in Bournemouth, pictured. (PA)

The family then went to the lifeguard, who gave them antiseptic wipes, took the needle and advised them to go straight to hospital.

Spiller’s partner, Ferne, took Clayton to hospital where tests were taken.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: UK begins trial of HIV medicine, steroid as possible COVID-19 treatments” data-reactid=”61″>Read more: UK begins trial of HIV medicine, steroid as possible COVID-19 treatments

But now Clayton’s parents have to spend “eight weeks of worrying” about whether their son has HIV.

Ferne Spiller said: “They were trying to reassure us the chances are low.”

“Because he is under-18 he had injections for hepatitis B and D, we’ll go back in three months for another one. I am just cross, upset and disappointed.”

doctor in scrubs doing blood testdoctor in scrubs doing blood test

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The little boy was taken to hospital for tests after an RNLI lifeguard advised them. (Getty)

A spokesperson for BCP Council told the Daily Echo that the seafront team “investigated and claimed no staff working at Boscombe were involved in the incident”.

Yahoo News have contacted Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council for comment.

Meanwhile, an RNLI spokesperson told the publication: “Our lifeguards undergo demanding training to prepare them for the many situations they may face on the beach.

Water rescues are only one area of their work and they deal with many aspects of casualty care, offering first aid and safety advice to anyone who needs their help. Our lifeguards work hard to ensure that everyone who visits the beach is able to return home safely.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: Have we found a cure for HIV? Five patients are ‘virus free’ months after new vaccine” data-reactid=”89″>Read more: Have we found a cure for HIV? Five patients are ‘virus free’ months after new vaccine

Injury from used syringes found in community settings like beaches arouses much concern, especially when children find discarded needles.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Needlestick injuries are most like to happen among healthcare workers who are accidentally exposed to infected blood, according to the Aids Map.” data-reactid=”91″>Needlestick injuries are most like to happen among healthcare workers who are accidentally exposed to infected blood, according to the Aids Map.

Injuries from discarded needles in the community (non-occupational exposure) are less common and infections rare.

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The 'Red Planet' approaches – Coast Reporter

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This summer has been pretty interesting with Comet NEOWISE, the Perseids and some close lunar/planetary appulses in September. (Yes, it’s my new vocabulary word of the month.) October, however, is all about Mars – but the COVID-19 threat we’re facing limits our options somewhat. 

Opposition occurs when Earth passes between the sun and a celestial object – they’re opposite to each other in the sky. Because of our orbital periods – 365 days for Earth and 780 earth days for Mars – a Mars opposition happens about every 26 months. However, the accompanying composite of Hubble images from previous oppositions illustrates that there’s more to it than just that. For example, although opposition is Oct. 13, we’re actually slightly closer on Oct. 6. 

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First, neither planet has a circular orbit; Earth’s is slightly elliptical and Mars’ is much more so. Hence, the close approach distance varies according to how close or far from the Sun each planet is. Second, Earth and Mars orbit in slightly different planes; Mars can be above or below the plane of Earth’s orbit and therefore a bit further away. As well, Mercury and Venus slightly affect Earth’s orbit and Jupiter affects everything, so all the orbits change slowly over time. Finally, we’re in the northern hemisphere; a near-winter opposition puts Mars much higher in the sky at night and we look through much less atmosphere. Although Mars isn’t quite as close as it was in July 2018, it will be about 30 degrees higher – better seeing. 

The Astronomy Picture of the Day site (APOD) at https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ for Sept. 11 has a striking photo of Mars emerging from behind the Moon taken on Sept. 6 from Brazil, one of five occultations this year. The photo, lovely as it is, illustrates the problem of viewing Mars for most of us: you need a telescope. While you can see Jupiter as a small disc and four moons with good binoculars and a tripod, Mars at its best is only a third that size. Without the current pandemic, I’m sure the Sechelt observatory would be open to the public for this opposition and people could stare to their hearts’ content, but at this point it doesn’t look good. Any changes will be posted on the club website. 

As in September, Jupiter and Saturn are low in the south after sunset, after their opposition in late July. The New Moon on the 16th coincides with its perigee (large tides) and it will pass Jupiter and Saturn a week later on the 22nd and 23rd. Interestingly, it will be a Full Moon on the 1st AND the 31st. 

Remember, all of the movements of moon and planets described can be checked out on the web at: www.heavens-above.com. The next regular meeting of the Astronomy Club should be Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. using Zoom. Information on the speaker and topic and how to register for the meeting will be on the club website at https://sunshinecoastastronomy.wordpress.com/ the week of the meeting.

– Richard Corbet

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Asteroid size of a bus comes close to Earth – Sierra Leone Times

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Scientists at the U.S. space agency NASA say a small asteroid – roughly the size of a bus – passed close to Earth on Thursday, flying just 22,000 kilometers above the surface, within the orbit of geostationary satellites that ring the planet.

While the proximity to Earth might raise alarm, scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Southern California said even if the asteroid had entered the earth’s atmosphere, it almost certainly would have broken up and become a bright meteor.

The asteroid, known as 2020 SW, is about five to ten meters wide and was first discovered on September 18 by the NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey in Arizona.

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NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) — part of the JPL — then did follow-up observations and confirmed its orbital trajectory, ruling out any chance of impact.

CNEOS director Paul Chodas says an object this size, this close to earth, is not uncommon. He says, “In fact, asteroids of this size impact our atmosphere at an average rate of about once every year or two.”

After passing the Earth, the asteroid will continue its journey around the Sun, not returning to Earth’s vicinity until 2041, when NASA says it will make a much more distant flyby.

The space agency says they believe there are over 100 million small asteroids like 2020 SW, but they are hard to discover unless they get very close to Earth.

In 2005, Congress assigned NASA the goal of finding 90 percent of the near-Earth asteroids that are about 140 meters or larger in size. These larger asteroids pose a much greater threat if they were to impact, and they can be detected much farther away from Earth, because they’re simply much brighter than the small ones.

Chodas says NASA’s asteroid surveys are getting better all the time, and the agency now expects to find asteroids the size of 2020 SW a few days before they come near Earth.

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Tla'amin Nation COVID-19 survivor warns virus spreads easily and recovery is difficult – Yahoo News Canada

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Brandon Peters was keeping his bubble small this summer.

The Vancouver resident planted a “COVID garden” and planned on playing it as safe as possible during the pandemic. Those plans were derailed, and so was his health, after attending the funeral of a loved one on Tla’amin Nation territory on the north Sunshine Coast near Powell River, B.C. 

Peters, a member of the nation, was diagnosed with COVID-19 within days of the visit. After spending most of September in bed fighting the virus, he is now speaking out publicly to warn people just how hard that fight can be.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""I opened myself up for just a minute, a couple people hugged me, and I got sick within a couple of days," said Peters Thursday on On The Island.” data-reactid=”15″>”I opened myself up for just a minute, a couple people hugged me, and I got sick within a couple of days,” said Peters Thursday on On The Island.

He said when he left the north Sunshine Coast, he was so overcome with fatigue he could not complete the 80 kilometre drive to the Langdale Ferry Terminal to catch a ferry to the Lower Mainland. Instead, he had to pull over and sleep.

Peters did make it back to Vancouver though, only to have a horrible night where he said he felt “deep pain” throughout his body and had an excruciating headache. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Down for the count” data-reactid=”18″>Down for the count

The next day he got tested for COVID-19. The day after that, he learned he was positive.

For the next few weeks, Peters lay in bed so overcome with exhaustion he said he couldn’t eat anything and drank only water.

“The fatigue was so intense I would have to gather my gumption just to go to the washroom,” he said.

In a recently uploaded video on the Tla’amin Nation’s Facebook page, Peters says he wondered every day while bed-ridden if he was going to make it to see another week.

Fortunately, Peters was never hospitalized and says he now has about 80 per cent of his strength back. Now he wants to tell others his story to try and prevent anyone from going through the harrowing ordeal he did — or worse.

The video is part of sharing that story.

“People might look at me like a leper over the next little while but I think if I help a couple people it will make the video worthwhile,” said Peters.

He said it is important to him that people take the risks of the virus seriously and stop engaging in activities that could put themselves or others at risk.

“This is going to be with us for a while and we need to make those responsible decisions.”

According to a media release from the Tla’amin Nation, there have been 36 positive COVID-19 cases reported in the nation since September 7.

The community is currently in a state of local emergency and non-approved visitors are restricted from Tla’amin land.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="To hear the complete interview with Brandon Peters on On The Island, tap here.” data-reactid=”30″>To hear the complete interview with Brandon Peters on On The Island, tap here.

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