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North Dakota Museum of Art reopens Tuesday with launch of 'Art in Isolation' exhibition – Grand Forks Herald

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The exhibition consists of assemblages of images submitted by artists and others in 35 countries around the world, including Portugal and Russia, as well as area communities, said Matthew Anderson, the museum’s director of education.

Last spring, museum staff members issued an online invitation to people asking them to submit images of how they were expressing their creativity during quarantine.

“Thousands of images started arriving from around the world …. The images describe an outpouring of creative expression,” said Anderson, adding that the pandemic has caused unanticipated change. “Change also fuels creativity, and that is what the North Dakota Museum of Art brought to light.”

As part of the launch of the “Art in Isolation” exhibition, the museum is asking visitors to donate a nonperishable food item to give to those in need and place it in drop boxes in the entry. Anyone who is in need may pick up a food item after viewing the exhibition; all remaining items will be donated to local food banks.

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The exhibition runs through Oct. 7.

Other exhibitions include “Consequences,” with artwork by Lynne Allen, a descendant of the Hunkpapa band of the Lakota on Standing Rock. In the late 1990s, after reading the journals of her great-grandmother, Josephine Waggoner, Allen began making objects that reflect the culture in those writings. These objects were crafted from paper, cut and stitched to shape and lacquered with shellac or from recycled vellum printed with images copied from Waggoner’s journals.

The museum is presenting more than 20 major prints by Allen, an internationally known printmaker, Anderson said.

The “Celebration” exhibition features artwork from the museum’s permanent collection, including Julie Buffalohead’s “Stolen Sisters,” a 4-by-18-foot, mural-sized acquisition that anchors the show. It illustrates the use of acrylic paint, ink, graphite and collage, applied to Nepalese Lokta paper, which has been used in Nepal since the 12th century to write epic tales, print mantra for use in prayer wheels and religious texts chanted by Buddhist monks.

The museum, located on the UND campus, south of Twamley Hall, has been closed to the public since mid-March when the national public health emergency, due to the spread of COVID-19, was declared.

When the facility reopens, new hours will be from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays.

The museum will be following CDC guidelines and working with UND officials to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, Anderson said. Visitors will be required to wear face masks and encouraged to practice social distancing.

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How This Saint John Art Gallery Is Making Its Exhibits 'Pandemic-Proof' – country94.ca

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How This Saint John Art Gallery Is Making Its Exhibits 'Pandemic-Proof'

Image: submitted.

Current Covid-19 regulations mean art galleries in New Brunswick can allow patrons inside their doors, but a Saint John gallery new project is making their exhibitions “pandemic proof” —  even if there’s another lockdown.

Jones Gallery, located at 1 Charlotte Street in uptown Saint John, has launched a new project called Gallery Sounds, which involved rethinking and designing the gallery to “pandemic-proof” their programming so everyone, even those not comfortable going inside, can enjoy the art.

“Back in the spring when everything shut down all of sudden, we started doing all the things that a lot of businesses were doing. We were spending more time on the online shop and stepping up social media, all the normal digital stuff,” says Sarah Jones, the gallery’s curator.

“But it felt like we were really missing having a cohesive exhibition for our artists. That’s the whole point of having a gallery. It’s not just a retail space, it’s a programming space for artists.”

Gallery Sounds combines physical and digital infrastructure to create a safe viewing and learning experience. They built additional walls inside the gallery facing the windows and added new lighting. They then equipped each window and sidewalk square with a link and QR code.

Visitors can go from window to window, see the artwork, scan the code, and hear conversations from the artist and curator about the work without entering the gallery.

“It’s the kind of conversation that you would hear inside the gallery, but you can access it outside,” says Jones.

With Saint John currently in the “orange phase,” Jones Gallery is offering online order and curbside pickup only, making the Gallery Sounds project’s mission quite pertinent.  The gallery plans to reopen to the public when the zone moves back to the “yellow phase.”

Under the “yellow” phase of recovery of Covid-19 economic recovery, art galleries like Jones’ are still able to host openings and events with proper social distancing measures and mandatory masks. But even though her spacious gallery makes hosting events feasible, Jones says some people are still left out from the experience.

“We have clients who are in the most at-risk age group or they have friends and family in that group who are going inside [places] as infrequently as possible. That was kind of the idea too,” she says.

“Can we do something so people can see the exhibition and still feel like they are still participating in some kind of gallery experience without having to come in?”

The project also positions the gallery so that if it even needs to close again due to a lockdown, it can still showcase their artists.

“If we have to shut down completely, what can we do to make sure that the exhibitions or the projects can go forward for the artists no matter what, even if the gallery has to close completely again,” says Jones.

Gallery Sounds currently features exhibitions by Saint John artist Darren Emenau and Fredericton-based artist Jared Peters. Though the project was spawned the challenges Covid-19 presented, Jones says it’s a format the gallery can continue to use even after the pandemic is over.”

“Covid has forced us to think about alternative strategies, but also the time to pursue ideas in a meaningful way also,” she says.

Cherise Letson is the associate editor of Huddle, an Acadia Broadcasting content partner.

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Students explore art themes in Re/LAUNCH/ing, vol. 3

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With school back in session, a new collaborative art project has been launched.

Re/LAUNCH/ing is aimed at hitting the same high notes that its predecessor with.draw.all did, but with the added emphasis on the intrinsic value of art to the artist.

Each month, StAlbertTODAY.ca will be displaying an online gallery of art created by high school students. October’s rendition features 12 creations from students at Paul Kane, Bellerose and St. Albert Catholic High.

Aisling ConneelyArtist: Aisling Conneely
Grade 11
Ink
Title: Bike Rack
Artist’s Statement: “This is an ink pen project of a bike rack. The most challenging part of this project was the amount of pens I went through!”
Sienna McEachernArtist: Sienna McEachern
Grade 11
Ink
Title: Bikes
Artist’s Statement: “My art displays the gears and parts of a bike. At times I struggled to capture the intricate details within the gears and spokes.”
Morgan PetrasArtist: Morgan Petras
Grade 11
Felt pen wash
Title: Suburbs
Artist’s Statement: “This is a perspective drawing done in the suburbs, then I used water based markers to create the felt pen wash.”
Caitlyn KurylowichArtist: Caitlyn Kurylowich
Grade 11
Felt pen wash
Title: Treehouse
Artist’s Statement: “This treehouse/boat is created using water based markers.”
GroupStilllife1Artists: Adam Steffes, Josh DeWitt and Taeghen Brezovski
Grades 11 and 12
Graphite pencil and charcoal
Title: Still Life
Artists’ Statement from Sam Mudryk and Josh DeWitt: “When COVID-19 unexpectedly hit our society, life felt so uncertain and stressful. Having the option to stay creative at home was a great way to keep busy during the lockdown. However, when school ended in June, it was hard to pick the pencil up again with the world moving at such a fast pace. Coming into art this second quarter has allowed my imagination to generate so much creativity and has been such an artistic release. I feel very fortunate to be able to have the chance to express myself and relax during such a difficult time.”
GroupStillLife2Artists: Sam Mudryk and Robyn Hickle
Grades 11 and 12
Graphite pencil and charcoal
Title: Still Life Start Up
Artists’ Statement: (see above)
Lauryn Taylor2Artist: Lauryn Taylor
Grade 10
Soft pastel and NuPastel
Title: Gunter
Claire BeauchesneArtist: Claire Beauchesne
Grade 10
Soft pastel and NuPastel
Title: Cow

Source:- St. Albert TODAY

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'Imagine Van Gogh' art show coming to Vancouver with 'exceptional COVID-19 measures' – Agassiz-Harrison Observer

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More than 200 of Van Gogh’s paintings are coming to Vancouver for what’s billed as an “immersive exhibition” from Europe.

The touring “Imagine Van Gogh” show will feature works by the Dutch master at Vancouver Convention Centre starting in February 2021, with a ticket pre-sale period already underway.

The exhibition has sold more than 300,000 tickets in Canada this year in Montreal, Quebec City and Winnipeg, and is now set to debut in Vancouver.

“Exceptional COVID-19 Measures” are promised by show presenters Encore Productions, Paquin Entertainment Group, Tandem Expositions and Fimalac Entertainment.

“The exhibition is a contactless experience,” notes a news release from Artsbiz Public Relations. “A limited number of guests will be allowed in on a timed-entry basis, hand sanitizer will be provided, physical distancing of two metres will be required, and masks will be mandatory upon entering. The exhibition will adhere to all safety guidelines established by the B.C. government.”

The tour website says the Winnipeg exhibit site is temporarily closed due to current COVID regulations in that city.

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The website promises “visitors wander amongst giant projections of the artist’s paintings, swept away by every brushstroke, detail, painting medium and colour.”

Created by French artistic directors Annabelle Mauger and Julien Baron, “Imagine Van Gogh” involves an “immersive concept” that transports the viewer “on a journey to the heart of the artist’s work,” according to an event advisory. “The exhibit brings Van Gogh’s canvases to life in a vivid, spectacular way; the audience will literally enter the artist’s world of dreams.”

According to Mauger, original canvasses are “expanded and fragmented,” then projected into unusual shapes to emphasize the exaggerations and distortions of Van Gogh’s work. “Visitors experience their energy, emotion, and beauty like never before,” Mauger explains.

More details are posted to imaginevangogh.com.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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