Connect with us

Business

'Not going to end the pandemic': Why those hopeful vaccine trial results are not all that they seem – National Post

Published

 on


Article content continued

“There’s lots still to be said in the background of the exciting news releases,” said Dr. Gerald Evans, head of the infectious-diseases division at Queen’s University’s medical school.

To prevent infection completely is a very high bar to achieve

It’s possible the vaccine actually prevented infection, and not just the resulting illness, but the results so far don’t show that, experts say.

“If (infections) were not lab confirmed with routine testing in all participants, then we would not know the impact on asymptomatic disease,” said Julie Bettinger, a University of British Columbia professor and vaccine-safety scientist.

Still, that may not be as worrisome as it sounds, even though asymptomatic people can spread the virus.

Actually preventing infection — as opposed to just averting symptoms or severe disease or death — is something relatively few vaccines accomplish, said Dalhousie University immunologist Dr. Scott Halperin.

A vaccine that managed merely to “downgrade” COVID-19 from a sometimes-deadly virus to a common cold would be very welcome, he said.

“To prevent infection completely is a very high bar to achieve,” said Halperin.

Evans agreed, saying a vaccine that provided “sterilizing immunity” — staving off infection itself — would be an amazing development. But even one that just afforded “protective immunity” — preventing people, especially the most vulnerable, from getting sick when they contract the virus, would be a “huge step forward,” he said.

Meanwhile, experts are debating how approval of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines — the first to get to the finish line in a massive global effort — will affect those still to come.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Lack of raw materials blamed for slashed supply target of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine – CBC.ca

Published

 on


A lack of raw materials used in the manufacture of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine played a role in the company’s decision to slash its 2020 production target, a spokeswoman told Reuters.

Pfizer has said in recent weeks that it anticipates producing 50 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year. That is down from an earlier target of 100 million doses. Pfizer’s vaccine relies on a two-dose regimen, meaning 50 million doses is enough to inoculate 25 million people.

A company spokeswoman said the “scale-up of the raw material supply chain took longer than expected.” She also cited later-than-expected results from Pfizer’s clinical trial as a reason for the smaller number of doses expected to be produced by the end of 2020.

The spokeswoman added that the modifications to Pfizer’s production lines are now complete and finished doses are being made at a rapid pace.

The Wall Street Journal was the first to report the news. It reported that an unnamed person directly involved in the development of the Pfizer vaccine said “some early batches of the raw materials failed to meet the standards,” which caused production delays.

Pfizer applied in November for emergency authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine from U.S. regulators. U.S. officials said they expect its vaccine to get regulatory clearance this month. The U.S. government expects its first allocation of the vaccine to include 6.4 million doses, with more to follow.

Regulators in the U.K. have already authorized Pfizer’s vaccine for use in that country.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Pfizer slashing COVID-19 vaccine doses from 100M to 50M due to ‘production quality issues’ – 680 News

Published

 on


Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is now expecting to ship only half of its COVID-19 vaccines it originally planned for by the end of this year because of supply-chain problems.

A company spokesperson tells the Wall Street Journal that the scaling up of the raw material supply chain took longer than expected.

Pfizer and it’s German-based partner hoped to roll out 100 million vaccines world-wide by December 31; that plan has now been reduced to 50 million.

The company still expects to ship more than a billion doses in 2021.

In mid-November, Ontario’s Health Minister Christine Elliott said that Canada is expected to receive millions of doses in the coming months.

The country is expected to receive four million doses of Pfizer’s vaccine and two million doses of Moderna’s between January and March.

Subsequently, Elliott said that Ontario will get roughly 1.6 million doses of Pfizer’s vaccine and around 800,000 of Moderna’s for proper distribution.

On Wednesday, Pfizer and BioNTech won permission for emergency use of their COVID-19 vaccine in Britain. The move allowed Britain to become one of the first countries to begin vaccinating its population.

In a series of tweets, Canada’s Health Minister, Patty Hajdu, described the United Kingdom’s decision to authorize the Pfizer’s vaccine as “encouraging.”

The federal government has been facing criticism on vaccines since Prime Minister Justin Trudeau admitted last week that other countries with domestic vaccine production are likely to inoculate their citizens first before shipping doses to Canada.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

3 Cheap TSX Stocks I’d Buy for the 2021 Bull Run – The Motley Fool Canada

Published

 on


Canadian equity markets have made a robust recovery after bottoming out in March, with the S&P/TSX Composite Index rising over 55% and is trading just 3.4% lower from its all-time high. The strong upward momentum could continue next year, driven by the pent-up demand as the vaccine’s availability inches closer. Goldman Sachs projects the global real gross domestic product (GDP) to grow by 6% next year.

Meanwhile, the pandemic took a severe toll on some of the Canadian stocks. Despite the last month’s recovery, these companies are trading at a discount and are offering excellent buying opportunities for long-term investors. So, here are the three TSX stocks that you should buy for higher returns during the 2021 bull run.

Air Canada

Amid the pandemic, the governments worldwide had imposed travel restrictions, severely impacting the passenger airline industry, including Air Canada (TSX:AC). With several of its aircraft grounded, Air Canada’s passenger volumes fell 96% and 88% in the second and third quarters on a year-over-year basis. It incurred net losses of $2.45 billion and burnt $2.54 billion of cash during the same period.

Meanwhile, the buying in Air Canada’s stock has been returning slowly amid the vaccine hope, with its stock price rising over 75% since the beginning of November. The vaccine could prompt the governments to ease restrictions, potentially boosting its lucrative international travel. Further, Air Canada has taken several initiatives to lower its expenses and cash burn, which is encouraging.

Although it could take a couple of years for the passenger demand to reach its pre-pandemic levels, Air Canada, a market leader, could bounce back more quickly. Despite the recent surge, Air Canada is still trading over 45% lower for this year, proving an excellent buying opportunity for long-term investors.

Enbridge

The oil prices have surged since Pfizer made the encouraging announcement on the vaccine on November 9, as investors grew optimistic about life and business returning to pre-pandemic ways. The surge in oil prices has brought some relief to the energy sector, including Enbridge (TSX:ENB)(NYSE:ENB), which rose over 13% since the beginning of November.

The rise in oil prices could boost its liquid mainline throughput driving its financials. Further, Enbridge continues to make advancements with its $11 billion secured growth projects, with approximately $5 billion left to spend by 2022.

The company’s management hopes that these projects and organic growth within its various segments to generate 5-7% DCF-per-share annual growth until 2022. So, the company’s growth prospects look healthy.

Besides, at 7.8%, Enbridge’s dividend yield looks attractive. Given its stable cash flows and healthy liquidity position, its dividends are safe. The company has consistently hiked its dividends for the past 25 years at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11%.

Cineplex

The pandemic-infused lockdown and the following restrictions have weighed heavily on Cineplex’s (TSX:CGX) financials. The company, which owns and operates 164 theatres across Canada, has incurred net losses of $98.9 million and $121.2 million in the second and third quarters. Its high cash burn and rising debt levels are also a cause of concern.

Cineplex has currently opened all its 164 theaters but operates them at a limited capacity, as per the local government restrictions. Meanwhile, the vaccine could increase customer footfalls and also aid the company to operate at full capacity. Further, many distributors have shifted the release dates of major movies to next year, which could contribute to the next year’s increased footfalls.

Cineplex has also taken several initiatives to reduce its expenses and cash burn, which is encouraging. Its valuation also looks attractive, with its forward price-to-earnings standing at 17.4.

Meanwhile, if you are looking for high-growth stock to invest, the following report would be of great help.

This Tiny TSX Stock Could Be the Next Shopify

One little-known Canadian IPO has doubled in value in a matter of months, and renowned Canadian stock picker Iain Butler sees a potential millionaire-maker in waiting…
Because he thinks this fast-growing company looks a lot like Shopify, a stock Iain officially recommended 3 years ago – before it skyrocketed by 1,211%!
Iain and his team just published a detailed report on this tiny TSX stock. Find out how you can access the NEXT Shopify today!

Click here to discover how!


The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Enbridge. Fool contributor Rajiv Nanjapla has no position in the companies mentioned.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending