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Ontario monkeypox cases rise to 423: Public Health Ontario – CBC.ca

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Public Health Ontario says there were 423 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the province as of Tuesday, up from 367 on Thursday. 

The agency’s latest report says most of the cases — nearly 78 per cent — were reported in Toronto.

Almost all of the people affected are male, with only two cases reported in female patients. Public Health Ontario says the average age of confirmed cases is just under 36 years old.

The report says 11 people have been hospitalized with the illness and two are in intensive care.

It says there are also 10 probable cases, nine of which are in men.

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Elevated risk of Monkeypox in Saskatchewan: SHA – CTV News Regina

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The Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA) has alerted the public to the elevated risk of acquiring Monkeypox through anonymous sexual contact.

“So far we’ve had three cases, who were exposed out of the province,” said Saskatchewan’s Chief Medical Health Officer, Dr. Saqib Shahab.

“We think the situation has changed now, in the last week. Where we have had evidence of exposures happening in Saskatchewan, in many cases happening through anonymous sexual contacts with people who have been coming into the province.”

Shahab noted that the exposures were happening almost exclusively to those in the gay, bisexual and men who have sex with men (gbMSM) community.

“We think now that there is a higher risk that we may see ongoing transmission within Saskatchewan … particularly in this community.”

Shahab noted that these trends were similar to what is being seen across Canada. He urged those in Saskatchewan at risk not to hesitate and reach out.

“If you belong to the gbMSM community it’s really important that at the first sign of illness you do contact the Healthline (811) for advice and seek testing and isolate till the diagnosis is made.”

INCREASED ELIGIBILITY FOR VACCINES

The SHA announced that Monkeypox vaccine requirements would be expanded to both post and pre exposure, following the alert.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has set aside 99,000 doses of the vaccine, with 50,000 doses being given to provinces so far, according to Shahab.

Those eligible for vaccinations include select high-risk contacts 18 years and older who are identified ideally within 4 days and up to 14 days after an exposure. Those who are at a high risk of exposure are also eligible. The SHA’s criteria includes:

  • Are transgender or self-identify as two spirit, bisexual, gay or men who have sex with men (MSM)

And one or more of the following:

  • Have had a recent sexually transmitted infection (in the past six months);
  • Report having had two or more sexual partners in the past six months;
  • Had (in the past six months) or plan to have sexual contact involving an exchange of money or other goods for sexual services;
  • Report having had (in the past six months) or planning to have sexual contact at an event or social gathering where there is MSM-themed sexual activity (sauna, bath house, club);
  • Have had (in the past six months) or plan to have sexual contact with an anonymous partner (at an event or via a hook-up app);
  • Planning to travel in the next three months to an area in Canada or internationally currently reporting monkeypox cases;

OR

  • Individuals 18 years and older who work or volunteer at an event or social gathering where there is MSM themed sexual activity (sauna, bath house, club).

The SHA has outlined how to properly isolate and protect others while contagious with Monkeypox on its website.

Monkeypox is a rare viral illness that causes fever, headache, swollen lymph nodes and lethargy, followed by the development of a rash over a person’s body. The disease is not easily spread from person to person according to the SHA. Monkeypox is spread through:

  • Close, personal, often skin-to-skin contact.
  • Touching bodily fluids or lesions of a person who is sick with the disease.
  • Exposure to contaminated objects such as bed linens or clothing.

There are currently around 30,000 Monkeypox cases globally, with approximately 1,000 of those occurring in Canada.

Saskatchewan’s current criteria for vaccination and its overall approach has been informed by other provincial responses such as in Ontario and Quebec, according to Shahab.

“We really hope that by this approach in Saskatchewan we can try to avert a quick or high surge of cases and also prevent further transmission.”

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Canadian Blood Services in talks around paid donations of plasma as supply dwindles

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Canadian Blood Services is in talks with companies that pay donors for plasma as it faces a decrease in collections.

The blood-collection agency issued a statement on Friday saying it is in “ongoing discussion with governments and the commercial plasma industry” on how to more than double domestic plasma collection to 50 per cent of supply.

Canadian Blood Services has previously cautioned that letting companies trade cash for plasma — a practice banned in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec — could funnel donors away from voluntary giving.

The bulk of the non-profit agency’s supply currently comes from abroad, including via organizations that pay donors.

It issued a plea earlier this week for donors to book and keep appointments, noting collections have been falling since July 1 despite a constant need for plasma in transfusions for surgery, cancer patients and accident victims.

The number of people who donate blood regularly dropped by 31,000 during the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving the organization with its smallest donor base in a decade, it said.

The agency has opened five new plasma donor centres in the last few years, with six more planned by 2024 in an effort to draw 25 per cent of its supply from Canadian donors.

“But this only gets us halfway there. More needs to be done,” Canadian Blood Services said in the statement.

Working with private partners may offer one way to reach the 50 per cent threshold.

“Any options considered must necessarily include controls to ensure plasma collected in Canada is used exclusively to manufacture immunoglobulins for patients in Canada, while also ensuring no negative impacts on Canadian Blood Services’ current and future blood and plasma collections network,” the agency said.

It said Monday it had only four days’ worth of O+ blood type supply and five days’ worth of O- and B- blood types.

The O- type is the one most commonly used in transfusions for traumas and emergency surgeries, since anyone can receive its red blood cells. The O+ blood type is also in high demand due to its compatibility with any other positive red blood cell.

Spokeswoman Delphine Denis said ongoing illness and isolation requirements related to COVID-19, heat-related weather issues and the return of pre-pandemic activities and summer travel that have left many people with less time to donate are all factors contributing to the shortage.

There are 57,000 open appointments that must be filled before the end of August across Canada, the agency said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 13, 2021.

 

Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

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Canada hasn’t needed to declare monkeypox an emergency, top doctor says. Here’s why – Global News

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Canada has not needed to declare an emergency over the monkeypox virus the same way the United States and the World Health Organization have as mechanisms are already in place to tackle the outbreak, the country’s top doctor said Friday.

Dr. Theresa Tam’s comments came a week after the U.S. declared a public health emergency in response to the monkeypox outbreak, which followed the WHO declaring monkeypox a global health emergency last month.

“There’s a very different approach in terms of accessing authorities and funding in the United States compared to Canada,” said Tam during a virtual news conference.

“We have different approaches … with the provinces being able to declare crises, emergencies at their level,” she added.

Read more:

The U.S. declared monkeypox a health emergency. Should Canada follow suit?

Tam noted that when the COVID-19 pandemic first hit Canada over two years ago, there was no actual declaration at the federal level for a public health emergency under the Emergencies Act.

“For monkeypox, we’ve been already doing all the things that the U.S. is also doing — being able to mobilize vaccines, being able to mobilize therapeutics,” she said, adding that the local and provincial authorities have the flexibility to do what they need to respond.

“Health Canada regulatory authorities are there for emergency purposes as far as needed as well,” Tam said.


Click to play video: 'About 50% of monkeypox vaccine supply used, Canada passes 1,000 cases: Tam'



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About 50% of monkeypox vaccine supply used, Canada passes 1,000 cases: Tam


About 50% of monkeypox vaccine supply used, Canada passes 1,000 cases: Tam

In Canada, as of August 10, 1,059 monkeypox cases have been reported across the country, with Ontario leading the case count with 511 infections, followed by Quebec with 426.

To date, there have been 28 hospitalizations, including two ICU admissions, due to monkeypox, but no deaths in Canada.

Tam said there were some “early signs” that cases are slowing down in the country, but it’s “a little too soon to tell.”

The growing threat of monkeypox has raised alarm in countries, including Canada, not accustomed to seeing such a surge as much still remains unknown about the viral infectious disease.


Click to play video: '‘Too soon to tell’ if monkeypox plateauing in Canada, but some early signs of slow down'



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‘Too soon to tell’ if monkeypox plateauing in Canada, but some early signs of slow down


‘Too soon to tell’ if monkeypox plateauing in Canada, but some early signs of slow down

Globally, more than 31,000 cases have been confirmed in 91 countries, according to the WHO. Tam said this represents a 19 per cent increase in global cases over one week.

On July 23, WHO’s chief declared monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern, citing the unprecedented rapid spread of the virus to many countries; the risk it poses to human health, and the potential for interference with international traffic.

Under the International Health Regulations (IHR), when a “public health emergency of international concern” is declared, international efforts are required to stop the spread of the virus. This could include sharing vaccines and treatments among countries and taking travel-related measures.

Read more:

Monkeypox cases in Canada surpass 1K, with most in Ontario

In Canada, the federal government has deployed to provinces and territories more than 99,000 doses of the Bavarian Nordic’s Imvamune or MVA-BN vaccine, normally used to treat smallpox.

More than 50,000 people have been vaccinated, as of August 11, said Tam.

U.S. health officials on Tuesday authorized a plan to stretch the nation’s limited supply of monkeypox vaccine by giving people just one-fifth the usual dose, citing research suggesting that the reduced amount is about as effective.

Tam said it was “an important approach to explore” and gather information to see if the same can be implemented in Canada.

“But for now, we are working together with the National Advisory Committee on Immunization for really pushing out the approach of one-dose first to reach as many people as possible in our most highly-affected populations,” she said.


Click to play video: 'Experts urge Canadian officials to take more action on monkeypox spread'



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Experts urge Canadian officials to take more action on monkeypox spread


Experts urge Canadian officials to take more action on monkeypox spread – Aug 5, 2022

Monkeypox is primarily transmitted through prolonged close contact with an infected person and the majority of cases reported in the current outbreak involve men who had intimate sexual contact with other men.

The current outbreak in Canada is largely from person-to person spread, said Tam, but the virus can also spread through direct contact with contaminated objects such clothing, sheets or other personal items.

Symptoms of monkeypox include a painful rash that could last between 14 and 28 days, which can be accompanied by fever, chills, headache, swollen lymph nodes, muscle pain, joint pain, back pain or exhaustion.


Click to play video: 'Monkeypox: Canada exploring fractional vaccine doses, but focused on 1st dose push'



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Monkeypox: Canada exploring fractional vaccine doses, but focused on 1st dose push


Monkeypox: Canada exploring fractional vaccine doses, but focused on 1st dose push

— with files from the Associated Press 

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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