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Ontario pediatricians caution on imminent crisis with rolling out flu shot | News – Daily Hive

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A group representing more than 1,400 Ontario pediatricians is cautioning “an imminent crisis” in rolling out the flu shot.

A recent online petition by members of the Ontario Medical Association are “expressing our urgent concerns regarding an imminent crisis in influenza vaccination.”

They note that more children were hospitalized last year with the flu than have been with coronavirus to date.

The group said that with the pandemic, there could be “unprecedented strong interest” among parents for the flu shot. There will also be the difficulties of the flu and coronavirus occurring at the same time in communities, and obstacles with physicians delivering vaccinations safely due to high demand.

“COVID-19 remains a growing and unpredictable threat. Not only do we want to prevent our children from getting sick with the flu, we also must prevent them from making others around them sick,” the petition adds.

In order to avoid this, the group is asking for the uptake of flu vaccine to rise from “the usual 30-35% of the population to much higher levels, especially for young children and infants over six months of age.”

In order to assist with the problem, the petition notes that Ontario pediatricians and other community physicians are willing to assist in planning large scale, community-based flu vaccination clinics.

This would allow the flu vaccine to be administered quickly and to a large part of the population, while also ensuring they’re stocked with PPE.

“These clinics could potentially be part of COVID assessment centers staffed by public health and community pediatricians and other volunteer physicians,” the group notes.

From 2019 to 2020, there was a total of 42,541 flu cases in the country, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Daily Hive has reached out to the Ontario Ministry of Health for comment and will update the article accordingly.  

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With 879 new COVID-19 cases, Quebec passes grim 100,000 milestone – Timmins Times

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The province also reported 11 more deaths as the cumulative total of cases reached 100,114.

With Quebec surpassing the 100,000 mark in new COVID-19 cases Sunday, it’s clear the winter ahead will be challenging, two epidemiologists said.

“I’m concerned that we’ve reached the 100,000 mark,” said Catherine Hankins, a professor of public health at McGill University and co-chair of the COVID-19 Immunity Task Force.

“We’re just at the start of what will be a cold winter, so we really need to ramp up our public health response,” she said.

A major challenge will be to achieve a balance between distancing measures to check the virus’s spread and mental-health issues caused by loss of social contact, especially as winter weather forces people indoors, Hankins said.

We should take inspiration from the Scandinavian saying: “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes,” she suggested.

“We should be able to get out in all types of weather and keep active if we dress appropriately, with the layers that we need,” she said.

Hankins proposed that the phrase “social distancing,” should be replaced by “physical distancing.”

There are still ways to connect with others while practising safety measures like avoiding gatherings, wearing masks, keeping a two-metre distance from people outside our household and hand washing, she said.

“One thing that’s important is that people continue to exercise,” she said.

“For our own mental health, we do need to keep physically active and, although physically distanced, we need to keep socially active, even if it’s by phone or online.”

For people who aren’t comfortable with videoconference apps, the good, old-fashioned telephone is a great way to stay in touch, she said.

“Pick up the phone. Don’t hesitate to call somebody. Don’t feel like you’re interrupting or bother them. Just pick up the phone and give them a call,” Hankins added.

Quebec reported 879 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday and 1,009 new cases Saturday, bringing the total to 100,114 since the first case was reported on Feb. 29.

Infections from Quebec continue to account for nearly half of Canada’s total, which stood at 213,959 on Saturday night.

Ontario, the province with the second-most infections, topped 1,000 cases for the first time on Sunday to reach a total of 70,373.

“I’m concerned to see that Ontario is getting up to our levels now. And I am really concerned when I look at places in Europe that thought they had it under some kind of reasonable control,” Hankins said.

Quebec has recorded more than 1,000 cases in seven of the last 10 days.

The province reported 11 more deaths on Sunday. Five of those fatalities occurred in the last 24 hours, another five occurred between Oct. 18 and 24 and one was from an unknown date.

The number of deaths associated with the virus now stands at 6,143.

The number of hospitalizations increased by two to 551. Of the patients hospitalized because of the virus, 97 are in intensive care, an increase of four from Saturday.

Of the new cases reported on Sunday, 146 were in Montreal, where a total of 40,869 have now been reported.

For the first time in a week, Montreal was not the region with the most new cases. Montérégie, with 162, reported the highest total.

Jay Kaufman, an epidemiologist at McGill University, said that with 800-1000 cases a day for almost three weeks now, “Quebec is not doing so badly” compared to many European countries and the United States.

However, with Quebec continuing to have the worst case counts in Canada, “there is still lots of room for concern,” he said.

The fact cases have plateaued in Quebec show distancing measures are working, he said.

“The cases are not declining, however, and hospitalizations are way up, and so I suspect that we will not be able to reopen closed businesses for some time still, which is terrible news for those businesspeople,” he added.

Hankins said there should be more emphasis on the contact-tracing cell phone app to fight the virus’s spread.

Additional measures to protect vulnerable residents of long-term care facilities that were hard hit during the first wave are essential, she added.

“We know that they’re an Achilles heel,” she said.

“This is the most vulnerable population and we really need to make sure that we get it right this time as best we can.”

mscott@postmedia.com

With additional reporting by David Rudin

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All our coronavirus-related news can be found at montrealgazette.com/tag/coronavirus.

Sign up for our email newsletter dedicated to local COVID-19 coverage at montrealgazette.com/coronavirusnews.

Help support our local journalism by subscribing to the Montreal Gazette here.

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With 879 new COVID-19 cases, Quebec passes grim 100,000 milestone – The Sudbury Star

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The province also reported 11 more deaths as the cumulative total of cases reached 100,114.

With Quebec surpassing the 100,000 mark in new COVID-19 cases Sunday, it’s clear the winter ahead will be challenging, two epidemiologists said.

“I’m concerned that we’ve reached the 100,000 mark,” said Catherine Hankins, a professor of public health at McGill University and co-chair of the COVID-19 Immunity Task Force.

“We’re just at the start of what will be a cold winter, so we really need to ramp up our public health response,” she said.

A major challenge will be to achieve a balance between distancing measures to check the virus’s spread and mental-health issues caused by loss of social contact, especially as winter weather forces people indoors, Hankins said.

We should take inspiration from the Scandinavian saying: “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes,” she suggested.

“We should be able to get out in all types of weather and keep active if we dress appropriately, with the layers that we need,” she said.

Hankins proposed that the phrase “social distancing,” should be replaced by “physical distancing.”

There are still ways to connect with others while practising safety measures like avoiding gatherings, wearing masks, keeping a two-metre distance from people outside our household and hand washing, she said.

“One thing that’s important is that people continue to exercise,” she said.

“For our own mental health, we do need to keep physically active and, although physically distanced, we need to keep socially active, even if it’s by phone or online.”

For people who aren’t comfortable with videoconference apps, the good, old-fashioned telephone is a great way to stay in touch, she said.

“Pick up the phone. Don’t hesitate to call somebody. Don’t feel like you’re interrupting or bother them. Just pick up the phone and give them a call,” Hankins added.

Quebec reported 879 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday and 1,009 new cases Saturday, bringing the total to 100,114 since the first case was reported on Feb. 29.

Infections from Quebec continue to account for nearly half of Canada’s total, which stood at 213,959 on Saturday night.

Ontario, the province with the second-most infections, topped 1,000 cases for the first time on Sunday to reach a total of 70,373.

“I’m concerned to see that Ontario is getting up to our levels now. And I am really concerned when I look at places in Europe that thought they had it under some kind of reasonable control,” Hankins said.

Quebec has recorded more than 1,000 cases in seven of the last 10 days.

The province reported 11 more deaths on Sunday. Five of those fatalities occurred in the last 24 hours, another five occurred between Oct. 18 and 24 and one was from an unknown date.

The number of deaths associated with the virus now stands at 6,143.

The number of hospitalizations increased by two to 551. Of the patients hospitalized because of the virus, 97 are in intensive care, an increase of four from Saturday.

Of the new cases reported on Sunday, 146 were in Montreal, where a total of 40,869 have now been reported.

For the first time in a week, Montreal was not the region with the most new cases. Montérégie, with 162, reported the highest total.

Jay Kaufman, an epidemiologist at McGill University, said that with 800-1000 cases a day for almost three weeks now, “Quebec is not doing so badly” compared to many European countries and the United States.

However, with Quebec continuing to have the worst case counts in Canada, “there is still lots of room for concern,” he said.

The fact cases have plateaued in Quebec show distancing measures are working, he said.

“The cases are not declining, however, and hospitalizations are way up, and so I suspect that we will not be able to reopen closed businesses for some time still, which is terrible news for those businesspeople,” he added.

Hankins said there should be more emphasis on the contact-tracing cell phone app to fight the virus’s spread.

Additional measures to protect vulnerable residents of long-term care facilities that were hard hit during the first wave are essential, she added.

“We know that they’re an Achilles heel,” she said.

“This is the most vulnerable population and we really need to make sure that we get it right this time as best we can.”

mscott@postmedia.com

With additional reporting by David Rudin

Related

All our coronavirus-related news can be found at montrealgazette.com/tag/coronavirus.

Sign up for our email newsletter dedicated to local COVID-19 coverage at montrealgazette.com/coronavirusnews.

Help support our local journalism by subscribing to the Montreal Gazette here.

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Canadian Press NewsAlert: Quebec reaches more than 100000 total cases of COVID-19 – The Tri-City News

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MONTREAL — Quebec reached more than 100,000 total cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, becoming the first province in Canada to hit the somber milestone since the pandemic began in March.

But despite remaining the country’s coronavirus epicentre, public health experts say a recent downward trend of infections is an encouraging sign.

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“It’s a moment where we all sit up and say wow, 100,000 – that’s a lot of zeroes,” said Erin Strumpf, an associate professor at McGill University specialized in health economics.

“But again I think the more important thing to be paying attention to is the trend that we’ve been seeing recently in the province.”

The province reported 879 new cases on Sunday, bringing the total to 100,114infections since the start of the pandemic.

The curve of new infections appears to have flattened over the past few weeks though, Strumpf said in an interview.

That downward trend, she said, coincides with stricter public health guidelines that aimed to stem the spread of the virus.

The government ordered the closure of bars and gyms, among other places, in hard-hit areas and advised residents to limit their contact with people who do not live in their households.

Montreal and Quebec City are among several Quebec regions that remain under the highest COVID-19 alert.

Strumpf said it is hard to pinpoint what exact measures are responsible for flattening the curve, however.

She added that she expects to see many public health restrictions remain in place moving forward. “It’s very difficult to know right now or to predict how long those closures may stay in place,” she said.

Still, the high COVID-19 infection numbers bring up painful memories for Quebecers who lost loved ones during the pandemic.

July Mak, whose 68-year-old father Paul contracted COVID-19 in a long-term care home in Montreal and died at the end of March, said the pain of her father’s death has not eased with time.

“To see these numbers this high… it blows my mind,” Mak said in an interview Sunday.

She said she wants the Quebec government to recognize that its COVID-19 data is more than just numbers — and thousands of people across the province have been directly affected.

“They mattered,” Mak said, about the thousands who have died.

On Sunday, Quebec Health Minister Christian Dube said on Twitter that the number of new infections is “stable but remains high.”

Those cases can turn into hospitalizations and deaths, Dube warned, urging Quebecers to remain vigilant to reduce transmission.

Quebec health officials also reported 11 additional deaths attributed to the novel coronavirus, bringing the total to 6,143.

Five of those additional deaths took place in the past 24 hours, five were reported between Oct. 18-23 and one occurred at an unspecified date.

Hospitalizations went up by two across the province, for a total of 551. Of those, 97 people were in intensive care — an increase of four compared to the previous day.

The province said it conducted 25,378 COVID-19 tests on Friday, the last date for which the testing data is available.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 25, 2020.

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