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Ontario reports 1100 new COVID-19 cases; 45 in Ottawa – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
Ottawa Public Health says 40 more people in the city have tested positive for COVID-19 and one more person has died.

The figure comes as 1,185 new cases of COVID-19 were reported across Ontario on Tuesday. Health officials also reported six additional deaths and 972 newly resolved cases. Ontario added 45 new cases of COVID-19 to its count in Ottawa. Figures from OPH and the province often differ due to different data collection times.

No new variants of concern were confirmed in Ottawa on Tuesday. To date, Ottawa has seen eight confirmed cases of the B.1.1.7 variant and two confirmed cases of the B.1.351 variant, according to the province.

Ottawa Public Healh’s COVID-19 dashboard shows a total of 15,207 laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the city since the first case was confirmed on March 11, 2020. Since the pandemic began 444 residents of Ottawa have died. 

OTTAWA’S COVID-19 KEY STATISTICS

Ottawa is in “Orange-Restrict” status under Ontario’s COVID-19 framework.

Ottawa Public Health data:

  • COVID-19 cases per 100,000 (previous seven days): 36.8 (down from 37.9 on Monday and 37.3 on Sunday)
  • Positivity rate in Ottawa: 2.2 per cent (March 1-7)
  • Reproduction number: 1.04 (seven day average)

Reproduction values greater than 1 indicate the virus is spreading and each case infects more than one contact. If it is less than 1, it means spread is slowing.

The Orange-Restrict category of Ontario’s COVID-19 framework includes a weekly rate of cases per 100,000 between 25 to 39.9, a percent positivity of 1.3 to 2.4 per cent, and a reproduction number of approximately 1 to 1.1.  

VACCINES IN OTTAWA

As of March 8:

  • Vaccine doses administered in Ottawa (first and second shots): 63,576
  • COVID-19 doses received (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna): 71,180

*OPH says staff were able to extract additional doses out of several vials, which were given to residents. In a statement on its dashboard, OPH said, “Vaccine inventory is based on an expected 5 dose per vial supply. Occasionally, an additional dose (6th dose) is successfully extracted and administered to clients.”

HOSPITALIZATIONS IN OTTAWA

There are currently 27 people in Ottawa hospitals with COVID-19 complications, including two in the intensive care unit.

Of the people in hospital, one is in their 20s, one is in their 50s (this person is in the ICU), seven are in their 60s, four are in their 70s, seven are in their 80s (one is in the ICU), and seven are 90 or older.

ACTIVE CASES OF COVID-19 IN OTTAWA

The number of people with known active cases remains above 500. There are 512 active cases of COVID-19, down from 513 cases on Monday.

Forty more people have recovered after testing positive for COVID-19. Ottawa Public Health reports 14,251 resolved cases of COVID-19 in the capital.

The number of active cases is the number of total cases of COVID-19 minus the numbers of resolved cases and deaths. A case is considered resolved 14 days after known symptom onset or positive test result.

COVID-19 TESTING

The Ontario government says 33,264 COVID-19 tests were performed provincewide on Monday.

The Ottawa COVID-19 Testing Taskforce said Tuesday that 2,378 swabs were processed at assessment centres in Ottawa on March 8 and 2,848 lab tests were performed in Ottawa on that date.

The average turnaround from the time the swab is taken at an Ottawa testing site to the result is 23 hours.

COVID-19 CASES IN OTTAWA BY AGE CATEGORY

  • 0-9 years old: Two new cases (1,137 total cases)
  • 10-19 years-old: Three new cases (1,882 total cases)
  • 20-29 years-old: 11 new cases (3,318 total cases)
  • 30-39 years-old: Seven new cases (2,135 total cases)
  • 40-49 years-old: Four new cases (1,951 total cases)
  • 50-59 years-old: Five new cases (1,836 total cases)
  • 60-69-years-old: Five new cases (1,108 total cases)
  • 70-79 years-old: Three new cases (667 total cases)
  • 80-89 years-old: Zero new cases (709 total cases)
  • 90+ years old: Zero new cases (461 total cases)
  • Unknown: Zero new cases (3 cases total)

COVID-19 CASES ACROSS THE REGION

  • Eastern Ontario Health Unit: 10 new cases
  • Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Public Health: 1 new case
  • Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit: 7 new cases
  • Renfrew County and District Health Unit: 3 new cases
  • CISSS de l’Outaouais (Gatineau and western Quebec): 15 new cases

INSTITUTIONAL OUTBREAKS

Ottawa Public Health is reporting COVID-19 outbreaks at 28 institutions in Ottawa, including long-term care homes, retirement homes, daycares, hospitals and schools.

One new outbreak was declared at the St. Vincent Hospital. An outbreak at the Maycourt Hospice has ended.

There are four active community outbreaks: one is linked to a construction workplace, one is linked to a restaurant, one is linked to a community organization and one is at a multi-unit dwelling.

The schools and childcare spaces currently experiencing outbreaks are:

  1. École élémentaire catholique La Vérendrye
  2. École élémentaire catholique Saint-Jean-Paul II
  3. École secondaire publique Gisele-Lalonde
  4. Gloucester High School
  5. Mothercraft Ottawa home childcare – 34081 
  6. Ottawa Islamic School
  7. Rodnichok childcare – 34075

The long-term care homes, retirement homes, hospitals, and other spaces currently experiencing outbreaks are:

  1. Bearbrook Retirement Residence
  2. Chartwell Duke of Devonshire
  3. Extendicare Laurier Manor
  4. Extendicare New Orchard Lodge
  5. Forest Hill
  6. Group Home – 32782
  7. Madonna Care Community
  8. Manotick Place Retirement
  9. Perley Rideau Veteran’s Health Centre – Gatineau Building
  10. Riverpark Retirement Residence (NEW)
  11. Rockcliffe Retirement Residence
  12. Sarsfield Colonial Home
  13. Shelter – 28778
  14. Shelter – 29677
  15. Shelter – 29770
  16. Shelter – 33435
  17. Shelter – 33687
  18. St. Vincent Hospital (NEW)
  19. The Ottawa Hospital – Civic Campus – A2
  20. The Ottawa Hospital – Civic Campus – A4 (Medicine)/A5/B5/Ama
  21. The Ottawa Hospital – General Campus – Single Unit 7Ncc/Ccu

A single laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 in a resident or staff member of a long-term care home, retirement home or shelter triggers an outbreak response, according to Ottawa Public Health. In childcare settings, a single confirmed, symptomatic case in a staff member, home daycare provider, or child triggers an outbreak.

Under provincial guidelines, a COVID-19 outbreak in a school is defined as two or more lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in students and/or staff in a school with an epidemiological link, within a 14-day period, where at least one case could have reasonably acquired their infection in the school (including transportation and before or after school care).

Two staff or patient cases of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 within a specified hospital unit within a 14-day period where both cases could have reasonably acquired their infection in hospital is considered an outbreak in a public hospital.  

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FDA vote expected on Johnson & Johnson vaccine booster shots – CNN

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13 more die of COVID-19 in B.C. as 667 new cases confirmed – CBC.ca

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British Columbia announced 667 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 more deaths on Friday, the most deaths in one day since Feb. 3.

In a written statement, the provincial government said there are currently 5,128 active cases of people infected with the novel coronavirus in B.C.

A total of 367 people are in hospital, with 152 in intensive care.

Overall hospitalizations, which typically lag behind spikes and dips in new cases, are up by 1.9 per cent from last Friday, when 360 people were in hospital with the disease and about 27 per cent from a month ago when 288 people were in hospital.

The number of patients in intensive care is up by about 11 per cent from 137 a week ago and by the same percentage from a month ago when 137 people were also in the ICU.

The provincial death toll from COVID-19 is now 2,055 lives lost out of 196,433 confirmed cases to date.

As of Friday, 89 per cent of those 12 and older in B.C. have received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 83 per cent a second dose.

So far, eight million doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered, including 3.8 million second doses.

There are a total of 19 active outbreaks in assisted living, long-term and acute care. There has been one new outbreak at GR Baker Memorial Hospital in Quesnel. The outbreak at Good Samaritan Delta View Care Centre has been declared over.

The acute care hospitals currently affected by COVID outbreaks are Mission Memorial Hospital, University Hospital of Northern B.C., GR Baker Memorial Hospital, and Tofino General Hospital. 

More than 90 people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and three people have died as a result of an outbreak at a care home in Burnaby, and officials say the death toll is expected to grow. 

The majority of cases at the Willingdon Care Centre are among residents, according to the B.C. Centre for Disease Control. Health Minister Adrian Dix said Thursday he expects the number of deaths will rise to 10 over the next several days due to a delay in data reporting.

New northern restrictions

More restrictions for the northern part of the province came into effect Thursday at midnight and will last until at least Nov. 19 in an attempt to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the region.

Restrictions in the region now include limiting indoor and outdoor gatherings to fully vaccinated people only, capping the number of people who can gather in any setting, moving worship services online, cutting off alcohol sales earlier at night and mandating masks and safety plans at organized events.

Health officials are strongly recommending people stay in their community unless it is essential for work or medical reasons. 

Restrictions are also in place in the Interior Health region and communities in the eastern Fraser Valley.

Provincial Health Officer Bonnie Henry continues to reiterate the importance of immunization to reduce the risk of illness and death due to COVID-19.

From Oct. 7 to 13, people who were not fully vaccinated accounted for 68.3 per cent of cases and from Sept. 30 to Oct. 13, they accounted for 76.3 per cent of hospitalizations, according to the province. 

Anyone who has not yet received a shot is encouraged to do so immediately. Appointments can be made online through the Get Vaccinated portal, by calling 1-833-838-2323, or in-person at any Service B.C. location. 

People can also be immunized at walk-in clinics throughout the province.

B.C. health officials are awaiting a federal review of COVID-19 vaccines for five- to 11-year-olds and are encouraging families to register their children now as they anticipate doses being available for this group by early November.

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U.S. border town welcomes back fully vaccinated B.C. visitors, but travel hurdles remain – CBC.ca

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Businesses in northern Washington state are welcoming back Canadian customers once the United States reopens its land borders, but a B.C. mayor says travellers may face hurdles.

The U.S. is allowing fully vaccinated travellers from Canada to enter the United States by air, land and ferry for non-essential travel starting Nov. 8.

Those entering the U.S. at a land border will be required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination or attest to their vaccination status upon request by a border agent. Land travellers do not need to show a negative COVID-19 test, a requirement for air travellers. 

Karen Frisbie, Chamber of Commerce president in Oroville, Wash. — a town of more than 19,000 residents bordering Osoyoos in B.C.’s South Okanagan — says her community has been quiet without Canadians travelling south to shop during the pandemic.

“We definitely miss our Canadian neighbours and look forward to having them back,” Frisbie said Friday to host Chris Walker on CBC’s Daybreak South.

Many border towns in Washington state struggled due to COVID-19 restrictions preventing Canadians from travelling across the border. The city of Blaine, for instance, said last August their finances were hit hard after several months without Canadian visitors.

Osoyoos Mayor Sue McKortoff says she can feel the happiness of Canadians who know they’ll be able to visit Oroville.

“A lot of the people in Osoyoos love to go to Oroville — they have their special places [and] restaurants [in Oroville], and they love to go down there for American milk and cheese and beer, and gas sometimes,” McKortoff said on Daybreak South.

But the mayor also strikes a cautious note.

“You still need a PCR test to come back to Canada,” she said, referring to a type of molecular testing. Molecular COVID-19 tests involve methods such a nose swab, or providing a saliva sample.

“You’re not going to go down there for a day, and [you] have to worry about having a PCR test in order to get back through the border.”

Canada still requires arriving travellers to present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of their entry to Canada, regardless of their point of entry — but labs could take more than 72 hours to issue a test result.

“We need to wait until all of those things have been solved a little bit better before people will even take the chance to go across,” McKortoff said.

LISTEN |  Karen Frisbie and Sue McKortoff share their hopes and concerns about U.S. border reopening to Canadians:

Daybreak South5:24What will opening the U.S. border to Canadians mean to border communities? We go to Oroville, Washington and Osoyoos to hear more about the impacts on those cities.

What will opening the U.S. border to Canadians mean to border communities? We go to Oroville, Washington and Osoyoos to hear more about the impacts on those cities. 5:24

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