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Opening up with art and music | The Daily Press – Timmins Press

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There is hope that life is getting back to normal and the pandemic is being managed to a great degree here in Canada.

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With this new normal, things are opening up. It has been a hard road for anyone involved in the creative arts and our artists, musicians, actors and dancers have all had to deal with little opportunity to entertain and stage their art.

Recently Adrian Sutherland, a childhood friend of mine from Attawapiskat released on Sept. 17, a debut solo album titled “When The Magic Hits”.

He has been hard at work in making and producing his music from his northern studio in Attawapiskat. In addition to his musical career, he is involved in many creative projects. You can view his latest music and creative projects at his website at adriansutherlandmusic.com .

Wabimeguil, an indigenous artist from Northern Ontario continues, even during the pandemic, to produce her work and market it across the country. She is a great inspiration to many in the North as she continues the spirit of creativity handed down from her late father Lindy Louttit who is originally from Attawapiskat.

Wabimeguil, which translates as “White Feather,” has been active as an artist for decades now and is well known for her traditional and cultural themes. You can view her work and more information about her at www.wabimeguil.com .

A creative pair of non-Native friends of mine, Alana Pierini and her partner Lee Holmes have been involved in producing music and visual arts for decades here in Northern Ontario and they have been featured in venues across the province and in Europe.

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They have been working right through the challenges presented by the pandemic and over the past two years have had to cancel showings and performances as a result of COVID-19 and the lockdowns we have experienced. The creative duo collaborate on visual arts and music. They have a rich and vibrant history as creative influencers. Lee has a long career that connects him to the music industry as a blues musician who has produced numerous albums and singles. Alana is a well known visual artist from Iroquois Falls who has inspired and taught many young people as a teacher and instructor and as an independent visual artist she has produced many works of art in various mediums over the years.  She also writes the lyrics for Lee’s music productions. In turn he contributes to the production of her art.

If you want to see some interesting art being featured right here in the North, you can do so by attending the Pierini Art Crawl at the Temiskaming Art Gallery (TAG) in New Liskeard on Nov. 6.

The event will feature Alana’s art work and performances by Lee Holmes and the Beautitones. You can find out more information about this latest art exhibit from the Temiskaming Art Gallery Facebook page. In addition, Lee and the Beautitones are also performing at various venues in the north in the upcoming month. You can find out more information at his website at: www.leeholmes.online .

Music and the arts are an important part of our lives and we have all looked to art, music and the movie world to help get us through this pandemic. Art in any form entertains us, makes us think, calms us and serves to mark special moments in time.

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I was reminded of the power of art and music when a friend on my social media shared a memorable YouTube music video of John Rodrique performing “Pretty Girl” at the Moosonee arena in 1991 during the Jammin’ On The Bay music event.

At the time, this simple original pop song from that regional concert made us feel like we had our own star and our own music. John and his band were all from the James Bay coast and we were proud to call them our own. We bought the cassettes they produced and we played them over and over again until they wore out.

My siblings, my teen friends at the time and I were experiencing those intense coming-of-age years and we were all on fire with our hopes and dreams. These many decades later, I look back on that trail of early life and see so many gone now, moved on to other realities and some having become parents and grandparents.

Still our own rock star John Rodrique, who passed at a young age, gave us a way to recall the joyful, energetic life so full of wonder back in 1991.

The power of art and music has always given us cause for reflection and hope.

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From Venus to Medusa, How Art Codifies the Objectification of Women – The New York Times

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From Venus to Medusa, How Art Codifies the Objectification of Women  The New York Times



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'The Barge' takes on a second life as a public art installation on social media – Vancouver Sun

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The City of Vancouver said Wednesday that Transport Canada has received a plan to move the barge.

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The barge at English Bay shows no end of inspiring Vancouverites.

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One of the memes circulating online is calling the barge — which became grounded at English Bay during a severe storm last month — a public art installation.

On Twitter, Greg @goldenmulletman said Monday after a failed attempt to remove the barge, “Hey @CityofVancouver you should admit defeat and declare this barge an urban art installation.”

Someone who knows about public art is Barrie Mowatt, founder and president of the Vancouver Biennale , the region’s outdoor public art exhibition.

He said the barge isn’t public art, but could be.

“It is in the public and in its current position artful, but it’s not public art in the sense of how we define public art,” he said. “It does certainly draw people’s attention and get them connected with the space. It’s cool in that sense.”

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Mowatt said the barge could become public art if it was incorporated into a narrative about the former industrial heritage of False Creek, for example, and how the city has changed since. As well, he suggested it could be painted and turned into a mural, but in a way that didn’t look like graffiti.

“Yes, it could become an interesting piece of public art,” he said from Palm Springs. “As it is now, with good signage, it could create dialogue and engagement about what is public art.”

Not everyone agrees with the idea the barge is or could be public art.

On Wednesday morning, Jo-Ann Heinz cycled from Yaletown to English Bay and Sunset Beach to see the barge because a friend contacted her to say something was happening. Nothing did, even though a high tide and whitecaps on the water all suggested movement.

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“I’m just kind of curious to see how they get this monstrosity off the seawall,” she said.

Heinz said while the barge could be turned into a restaurant, she questioned the idea that it was already an example of public art just by its position on the rocks.

Heinz is a sailor who has been around the world and seen similar examples of wrecked vessels abandoned on the shore. She called them eyesores.

“This is an eyesore,” she said. “We’re in Vancouver. We should be able to figure out how to get this off the shore.”

It looks like the barge will be at home on English Bay for a few more days.

The City of Vancouver said Wednesday that Transport Canada has received a plan to move the barge from its owner.

“In the coming days, the barge will be assessed and repaired as needed in preparation for its removal,” the city said by email.

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A crane towed by a tugboat leaves English Bay on Wednesday after stormy weather put a halt to the latest effort to free the barge.
A crane towed by a tugboat leaves English Bay on Wednesday after stormy weather put a halt to the latest effort to free the barge. Photo by NICK PROCAYLO /PNG

The homophonic link between “Barge on the Beach” and “Bard on the Beach” has inspired a parody of a famous speech from the play Henry V by William Shakespeare.

Christopher Gaze, founder and artistic director of Bard on the Beach , Vancouver’s summer Shakespeare festival, said he thought of the play’s famous St. Crispin’s Day speech given by the king on the eve of the Battle of Agincourt. The speech was meant to inspire the outnumbered English forces to overcome the French.

In Gaze’s version, the speech is about the failure to float the barge away on the king tide that would have lifted the barge like “Noah’s flood.”

“This day is called the Barge on the Beach day/We that shall live this day and come safe home/Will stand a tiptoe when this day is named/And rouse us at the sight of the Barge on the rocks./West End residents that shall live this day and see old age will/yearly feast their neighbours/And say, tomorrow is the bedevilled Barge Day …”

Gaze said the timing focuses attention on Bard on the Beach, which returns to Vanier Park/Senakw next summer after being cancelled for two years because of the pandemic.

kevingriffin@postmedia.com

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Around Town: Art of Inclusion – Alaska Highway News

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Carmella Klassen paints a snowman in the window of the Fort St. John Association for Community Living’s Art of Inclusion studio on 100 Avenue. 

The art program began earlier this year, and recently moved into a standalone studio down the street from the ACL office, where members show up to sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays to learn how to work with paints and pastels, linocuts and silkscreens, and other mixed-media techniques.

“I love art,” says Klassen, who has been taking part in the program since the beginning. “I make something new every time, and I want to learn how to do different things. Lorna is one of the best teachers I can think of.”

Klassen is referring to Montney artist Lorna Penner, who has been helping out with instruction since August. On Tuesday afternoon, Penner was working with Klassen and others on mixed-media self-evaluations and teaching them how to paint with pastels.

“It’s talking about how they feel when they do art. They’re very determined, they’re unique,” says Penner. 

Penner works with about four students per session, which she says is perfect. “We can really get into things very deep,” says Penner.

The studio recently held a printmaking open house for family and friends, and exhibited a COVID-19 show at Peace Gallery North earlier this year.

The program wraps for the holidays next week and will continue in the new year.

FSJACL-ArtofInclusion
Lily Rogova (left) and Victoria Nichols work on an art piece at the Fort St. John Association for Community Living’s Art of Inclusion studio. Matt Preprost

Email Managing Editor Matt Preprost at editor@ahnfsj.ca

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