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Ottawa Public Health releases coronavirus data by neighbourhood – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
A new, interactive neighbourhood-by-neighbourhood map shows a breakdown of COVID-19 infections in the city.

The map was produced in a partnership between Ottawa Public Health and the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study.

OPH says the map was created and released “in the interest of transparency” but continues to stress that COVID-19 is prevalent across the city.

“Areas with lower or higher rates are not more or less ‘safe’ from COVID-19 transmission. The map […] is based on the neighbourhood of residence of Ottawans with confirmed COVID-19 infection and does not necessarily reflect where the people ‘caught’ the virus,” a disclaimer on the study’s website says. “Exposure to COVID-19 can occur anywhere people congregate, such as workplaces or services open to the public.”

The data used to create the map represent all cases reported from March to August 2020 and were extracted by Ottawa Public Health from the OPH COVID-19 Ottawa Database. As of Aug. 31, 2020, there were 2,975 total laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the city.

The map can be viewed here.

It shows not only the total number of laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 by neighbourhood but also the rate per 100,000 residents by neighbourhood.

According to the data, the Ledbury—Heron Gate—Ridgemont neighbourhood topped the list for having the most COVID-19 cases and the highest per capita rate. A total of 123 people in the neighbourhood had tested positive for COVID-19 between March and August, which represents a rate of 912.26 per 100,000 residents.

The top five neighbourhoods for total cumulative COVID-19 cases (as of Aug. 31) are:

  1. Ledbury—Heron Gate—Ridgemont: 123 cases
  2. Overbrook—McArthur: 73 cases
  3. Old Barrhaven East: 54 cases
  4. Bayshore—Belltown: 48 cases
  5. Portobello South: 42 cases

The top five neighbourhoods by rate per 100,000 residents (as of Aug. 31) are:

  1. Ledbury—Heron Gate—Ridgemont: 912.26
  2. Bayshore: 518.91
  3. Emerald Woods—Sawmill Creek: 444.62
  4. Overbrook—McArthur: 381.17
  5. Marlborough: 363.98

Thirty-one of the 111 neighbourhoods on the map have fewer than five cases.

It’s important to note that these neighbourhoods are scattered across the city and have different population densities. The Marlborough neighbourhood is in the rural south of Ottawa, for example. OPH notes that “rates (per 100,000 residents) in rural neighbourhoods will be more sensitive to changes in the number residents with confirmed COVID-19 infection, as they have smaller populations.”

As well, neighbourhoods that are right next to each other might have wildly different case counts or rates.

Centretown, for instance, had 40 cases as of Aug. 31, according to the map, but just a short drive away to Old Ottawa East, only nine cases were reported. Cross over to Billings Bridge, and the number rises to 24.

OPH notes that with COVID-19 cases found across the city, the best practices for keeping infection rates low should continue to be followed.

“The best way to limit your exposure to COVID-19 is to practice physical distancing with those outside your household, wear a mask where required and when you cannot maintain physical distance, and wash your hands regularly.”

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Coronavirus: Who is most likely to suffer long Covid symptoms? – AlKhaleej Today

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Thank you for reading the news about Coronavirus: Who is most likely to suffer long Covid symptoms? and now with the details

Scientists in the UK have uncovered the risks of suffering the phenomenon known as ‘long Covid’ – long-lasting symptoms of Covid-19.

King’s College London researchers estimate that one in 20 people are sick with the novel coronavirus for at least eight weeks.

They say old age and a wide array of initial symptoms increase the risk of enduring Covid-19 for an extended period of time.

Being female, overweight and having asthma also increases the risk of suffering ‘long Covid’.

The research, which uses data from the Covid Symptom Study App currently being used by 4.3 million Britons, suggested ‘long Covid’ affects around 10 per cent of 18 to 49-year-olds who become indisposed with coronavirus.

Public Health England (PHE) discovered that around 10 per cent of people with Covid-19, who were not hospitalised, had revealed symptoms lasting more than four weeks.

The symptoms of long Covid include extreme fatigue, prolonged loss of taste or smell, respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms, and mental health problems.

They also include hair loss, pain and inflammation throughout the body, rashes and blood-clotting issues.

According to BBC News, scientists scoured the data for patterns that could predict who would get long-lasting illness.

The results, which are set to be published online, illustrate that long Covid can affect anyone, but some factors do increase the risk.

“Having more than five different symptoms in the first week was one of the key risk factors,” Dr Claire Steves, from Kings College London, told BBC News.

As per BBC News’ report, somebody who had a cough, fatigue, headache and diarrhoea, and lost their sense of smell – which are all potential symptoms – would be at higher risk than somebody who had a cough alone.

The risk also rises with age – particularly over 50 – as did being female.

Dr Steves said: “We’ve seen from the early data coming out that men were at much more risk of very severe disease and sadly of dying from Covid, it appears that women are more at risk of long Covid.”

No previous medical conditions were linked to long Covid except asthma and lung disease.

Fatigue is common in long-Covid sufferers, but symptoms vary from one patient to the next.

The exact symptoms of long-Covid vary from one patient to the next, but fatigue is typical.

Vicky Bourne, 48, started off with a fever and a “pathetic little cough” in March, which became “absolutely terrifying” when she struggled to breathe and needed to be given oxygen by a paramedic.

She was not hospitalised but is still – in October – living with long Covid.

Vicky’s health is improving, but her vision has changed and she still gets “waves” of more serious illness. Even walking the dog makes her suffer, so much so that she can’t talk at the same time.

She told the BBC: “I have strange, almost arthritic joints and weirdly, two weeks ago, I lost my sense of taste and smell again, it just went completely.

“It’s almost like there’s inflammation in my body that’s bouncing around and it can’t quite get rid of it, so it just pops up and then it goes away and pops up and goes away.”

These were the details of the news Coronavirus: Who is most likely to suffer long Covid symptoms? for this day. We hope that we have succeeded by giving you the full details and information. To follow all our news, you can subscribe to the alerts system or to one of our different systems to provide you with all that is new.

It is also worth noting that the original news has been published and is available at Khaleej Times and the editorial team at AlKhaleej Today has confirmed it and it has been modified, and it may have been completely transferred or quoted from it and you can read and follow this news from its main source.

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Hospitals struggle as 20 European countries record highest daily number of COVID cases – ABC News

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Europe’s coronavirus second wave is in full swing with 20 countries on the continent, including the UK, Italy and Switzerland, reporting record numbers of COVID-19 infections.

The UK topped the list with 26,668 new cases and 191 coronavirus-related deaths in the previous 24 hours, while Italy recorded an additional 15,199 infections, up from its previous record of 11,705 on Sunday.

The Czech Republic saw an increase of 11,984 cases on Wednesday, while Poland recorded 10,040 and Switzerland had 5,596 new infections.

The records are following a worrying trend in Europe which is forcing governments to reintroduce restrictions on social interaction and hospitality services throughout the continent.

According to data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Europe has registered more than 5 million cases and 200,000 deaths, with new cases beginning to rise sharply from the end of September.

Meanwhile, Spain has become the first western European country to reach more than 1 million confirmed cases after reporting 16,973 additional cases in the past 24 hours.

The country has 34,366 confirmed deaths.

European Union leaders will hold a video-conference next week to discuss how to better cooperate as the infections rise.

Hospitals struggle to cope

A group of health workers in PPE surround a male patient on a stretcher
Health authorities across Europe are worried about hospital bed and ICU capacity as COVID-19 cases soar.(Reuters: Eric Gaillard)

With case numbers that were brought largely under control by lockdowns in March and April now surging, authorities in countries from Poland to Portugal have expressed mounting alarm at the renewed crisis confronting their health infrastructure.

Belgium, struggling with what its health minister called a “tsunami” of infections, is postponing all non-essential hospital procedures, and similar measures are looming in other countries where case numbers have been rising relentlessly.

“If the rhythm of the past week continues, rescheduling and suspending some non-priority activities will become unavoidable,” Julio Pascual, medical director at Barcelona’s Hospital del Mar, told Reuters.

European countries boast some of the world’s best health services and doctors say that with the benefit of almost a year’s experience with coronavirus, they are much better equipped to treat individual patients clinically.

But the capacity of hospitals to handle a wave of COVID-19 patients, as well as people suffering from cancer, heart disease and other serious conditions, is still vulnerable.

Dutch health authorities said if the number of COVID patients in hospital wards continues to grow, three quarters of regular care may have to be scrapped by the end of November, and there were similar warnings from Czech authorities.

“We have hit a wall on clinical beds,” Wouter van der Horst, spokesman for the Dutch hospital association NVZ, said.

‘We couldn’t get to everyone’

As hospital admissions have spiralled, much attention has been focused on intensive care units, which came close to being overwhelmed in many areas during the first wave of the crisis.

On Wednesday authorities in Lombardy, the Italian region at the centre of the first wave of the pandemic, ordered the reopening of special temporary intensive care units set up in Milan and Bergamo that were shut down as case numbers receded.

Already, a number of regional health authorities in Germany, one of the countries that dealt with the first wave most effectively, have agreed to take in intensive care patients from other countries.

The ECDC said that some 19 per cent of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 are estimated to have ended up in hospital and eight per cent of those could require intensive care, but variations are wide both across Europe and within individual countries.

On Wednesday, Poland’s Health Minister said up to 30 per cent of new cases there could end up being hospitalised.

There has also been concern over the track and trace systems meant to keep local outbreaks of the disease under control but those systems have proven ineffective in many areas.

Authorities in Ireland, where the five-day case average has tripled since the start of October, said there were no longer enough officials to keep the system working.

Niamh O’Beirne, national lead for testing and tracing, told RTE radio that contact tracing centres had seen “unprecedented demand” with exponential growth in the number of cases, “and over the week we simply couldn’t get to everyone”.

ABC/wires

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Fraser Health names two weddings for potential coronavirus exposure | News – Daily Hive

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Fraser Health is alerting the public about two weddings this month where guests could have been exposed to coronavirus.

The two weddings in the Fraser Health region both happened on October 10. The first was in Port Moody at Saint St. Grill. The exposure time applies all day from 5 am to 11 pm.

The second was in Mission at Lake Errock, again from 5 am to 11 pm.

The alert comes on the same day that Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry threatened further restrictions could be enacted as social gatherings including weddings and funerals fuel the province’s second wave of coronavirus cases.

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