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Ottawa to delay second doses of COVID-19 vaccine as supply dwindles

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The City of Ottawa says it has to delay second doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for some people who have already received their first shot due to a temporary shortage of vaccines.

Anthony Di Monte, general manager of emergency and protective services, said Wednesday some long-term care home and retirement home staff, residents and essential caregivers will have to wait up to 27 days, or nearly a week longer than the 21-day period that’s recommended.

For others who received their first vaccine, they may have to wait up to 42 days, he said.

The federal government announced on Friday Canada would be getting fewer COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech over the next few weeks because the company has to make changes to a production line in Belgium to grow its manufacturing capacity.

In Ottawa, that means the city will be getting no new Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines next week, said Di Monte. The supply the city does have will be focused on ensuring that those who are due for a booster will get their second shot as soon as possible.

The first dose of vaccines have already been administered to more than 92 per cent of long-term care home residents in Ottawa at all 28 facilities. Residents at one at-risk retirement home and one congregant living setting have also been vaccinated, said Di Monte.

“Our next step is to administer the second dose to those individuals who have already received their first dose of the vaccine. Depending on the vaccine supply we receive from the province, which we know will be minimal in the next few weeks, we will then shift our focus to the high-risk retirement homes,” said Di Monte.

Ottawa has 36 high-risk retirement homes and so far, only the one has received doses of the vaccine.

Dr. Vera Etches, Ottawa’s medical officer of health, said delays beyond 21-day gap are permitted under guidelines established by the National Advisory Committee on Immunization.

“The recommendation is of course to follow the dosing schedule as much as we can,” she said. “But in the context of limited supply … jurisdictions can maximize the number of individuals that are getting the benefit from the vaccine by going ahead with the first dose and delaying the second dose.”

While there isn’t data to show what effects waiting up to 42 days may have on the COVID-19 vaccine efficacy, typically delays in booster shots do not affect the durability of vaccines, she said.

 

Source:- CBC.ca

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SoftBank-backed Compass makes IPO filing public, reveals revenue jump

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(Reuters) – Real estate brokerage firm Compass Inc published its filing for an initial public offering and revealed a 56% surge in revenue helped by a strong housing market on Monday.

Compass, which runs an integrated software platform that serves real estate agents in the residential real estate market, has been lifted by the COVID-19 pandemic as more people prefer to buy and sell homes online.

The New York-based startup said its revenue rose to $3.72 billion in 2020 from $2.39 billion a year earlier, while net loss narrowed to $270.2 million from $388 million a year ago. (https://bit.ly/3r9aY7F)

The strong growth came in contrast to a dim outlook the company had when the coronavirus first hit the United States a year ago. It laid off 15% of its employees and predicted a 50% decline in revenue.

Compass was founded in 2012 by Ori Allon, a former director of engineering at Twitter Inc, and Robert Reffkin, who worked at Goldman Sachs earlier. The firm covers 46 metropolitan statistical areas in the United States and works with over 19,000 agents. It generates revenue from commissions paid for transactions on the platform.

The company has raised $1.5 billion from investors including Soft Bank Group Corp, Goldman Sachs and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. It was valued at $6.4 billion after its $370 million funding round in 2019.

Other public-listed brokerages including Redfin Corp and Zillow Group Inc, have seen their shares rebounding strongly from last March’s lows.

Compass had confidentially filed to go public in January. Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Barclays are the underwriters for its offering.

 

(This story corrects name of founders in para 5)

 

 

 

(Reporting by Niket Nishant in Bengaluru and Krystal Hu in New York; Editing by Amy Caren Daniel, Shinjini Ganguli and Jonathan Oatis)

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NACI: AstraZeneca vaccine 'not recommended' in people 65+ | COVID-19 in Canada – CTV News

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  1. NACI: AstraZeneca vaccine ‘not recommended’ in people 65+ | COVID-19 in Canada  CTV News
  2. AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine ‘not recommended’ in people 65 and older: NACI  CTV News
  3. Oxford-AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine not recommended for seniors, Canadian committee says  CBC.ca
  4. Europe must get its act together with Covid vaccine rollout  Telegraph.co.uk
  5. Pfizer and AZ Covid jabs ‘highly effective’ in elderly: UK study  RFI
  6. View Full coverage on Google News



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AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine not recommended for people in Canada over age 65: NACI – Global News

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Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is not currently recommending the newly approved COVID-19 vaccine from AstraZeneca be used on people aged 65 or older.

According to the NACI website, this is “due to limited information on the efficacy of this vaccine in this age group at this time.”

Read more:
Canada approves AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

However, the agency said the vaccine has “demonstrated an average efficacy of approximately 62 per cent in those aged 18-64 years of age.”

The vaccine received approval from Health Canada on Friday.

NACI said the AstraZeneca vaccine should be delivered in two doses four to 12 weeks apart.

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However, the committee said the interval between the first and second dose of the vaccine may impact the shot’s efficacy, “with lower efficacy if the interval is less than 12 weeks.”

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Click to play video 'Health Canada approves Oxford-AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine'



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Health Canada approves Oxford-AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine


Health Canada approves Oxford-AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

The AstraZeneca vaccine became the third to receive regulatory approval in Canada, joining ones from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech.

Canada has ordered 24 million doses of the vaccine.

A senior government official told The Canadian Press on backround that the first of the AstraZeneca vaccines could arrive in the country as early as Wednesday, though the shipment has not been confirmed.

Read more:
AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine and the ‘seniors’ question

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Speaking to reporters on Friday, Dr. Supriya Sharma, Health Canada’s chief medical adviser said while the vaccine was not tested on people over the age of 65, “emerging, promising” real-world data from countries already using the product suggest it is safe and effective among older age groups.

“For someone 65 years and older, the question is, the benefits of getting the vaccine versus not, will it outweigh the risk? The answer to that is yes, based on all the information we have,” she said.


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Understanding the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine


Understanding the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

The guidelines released by the NACI are recommendations, meaning provinces and territories have the final say on how the vaccines are ultimately administered within their jurisdiction.

-With files from Global News’ Rachael D’Amore and The Canadian Press

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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