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‘Pandemic drop’ has made Lana unsure whether her sizable investments can really sustain her for life – The Globe and Mail

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Lana withdraws from her holding company each year as a dividend to use as personal income.

Anne-Marie Jackson/The Globe and Mail

Retired with no work pension, Lana, who is only 49, can be forgiven for worrying she might run out of money some day. Yet she has substantial investments – proceeds from the sale of her share in a successful business – and a mortgage-free house in a small Ontario city.

“I’m an early retiree, managing my portfolio myself, and I have seen quite a pandemic drop,” Lana writes in an e-mail. “While not as drastic now as it was in the beginning of March, the erasure of almost all my portfolio gains makes me unsure as to whether I will have the ability to sustain retirement without either changes to my portfolio, my withdrawals, my status as a retiree, or a combination of all three,” she writes.

Lana had been renting out a studio apartment in her house on Airbnb, but would prefer to stop. “I’m unlikely to have any further income this year anyhow.”

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Lana is spending about $39,200 a year, paid for by the $53,000 she withdraws from her holding company each year as a dividend. She wonders whether this is the best way to structure her personal income from a tax point of view. She wonders, too, if her investments are “well-enough diversified to weather a continued retirement” with the same income. Her overarching goal: “Don’t run out of money.”

We asked Daniel Evans, a certified financial planner at Money Coaches Canada in Vancouver, to look at Lana’s situation.

What the expert says

To ensure her savings will last, Lana should draw first on her holding company dividends until they are exhausted, then on her registered retirement savings plan and finally on her tax-free savings account, Mr. Evans says.

Including all income sources – holding company dividend, investment returns and rent – Lana’s taxable income for 2019 was about $89,000, putting her in the 31.48-per-cent tax bracket (federal and provincial combined). He recommends Lana stop renting out her flat because she does not need the money to maintain her standard of living.

The loss of rental income – about $10,000 last year – may bring Lana’s current taxable income to the lower bracket of $48,546 to $78,786, which is taxed at 29.65 per cent.

“The indexed $53,000 of dividends is enough to support $39,200 a year after-tax in spending,” the planner says. The after-tax dividend would be about $43,000, giving Lana a bit of a surplus that can be directed to her TFSA.

The dividends will last until 2027, at which point Lana will have to draw on her other accounts. The planner recommends she leave her TFSA intact for the long term because the tax-free status of income earned and compound growth in the account “is simply too good to pass up.”

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The planner recommends starting RRSP withdrawals at $20,000 a year in 2027, when her income would be lower because she would no longer be drawing dividends. “Not only would the RRSP be able to grow tax-sheltered for another seven years, but she would also be saving about $1,100 a year in taxes by starting the withdrawals in 2027 rather than in 2020,” he says.

This income would need to be supplemented with $30,000 in non-registered redemptions (indexed for inflation). This amount will fall when she starts collecting Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security benefits at the age of 65. Alternatively, she could choose to begin collecting CPP at 60, he says.

Because Lana does not plan to contribute further to CPP, she would probably qualify for about 44 per cent ($6,188) of the maximum CPP benefit ($14,109) at the age of 65, the planner says. If she decides to take CPP at 60, her benefit drops to 28 per cent ($3,960) of the maximum. The annual difference in real dollars for taking CPP early is about $2,228.

As long as Lana is taking dividends from the holding company, Mr. Evans recommends she put any surplus savings into her TFSA. She also has the option to move some funds from her non-registered account to max out her TFSA contributions in 2020.

Based on $20,000 a year in withdrawals from her RRSP up until the age of 71 (the time when she needs to convert her RRSP to a registered retirement income fund), the minimum withdrawal required from the RRIF would be $14,500, increasing each year with the mandatory minimums. That assumes a return of 3.51 per cent annually after fees. Any shortfall would come from her non-registered portfolio.

“The TFSA comes in late to the game, funding the later years from age 80 onward, after her non-registered assets have been depleted,” Mr. Evans says.

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In today’s dollars adjusted for inflation at 2 per cent a year, the planner’s assumptions show Lana can spend $40,000 a year after tax until the age of 90. “Life expectancy does play a role in recommendations,” he adds, but Lana says 90 is the appropriate estimate. “Given she is careful with spending, this should allow her to continue her current lifestyle.”

Finally, Mr. Evans looks at Lana’s investments. With the stock market outlook uncertain, “it is extremely important for her to revisit her risk tolerance,” he says.

Her current asset allocation is 5 per cent cash, 40 per cent fixed income and 55 per cent equities. Of the 40 per cent fixed income, 15 per cent is allocated to preferred shares and 25 per cent to bonds. Of the 55 per cent in equities, she has 13.75 per cent in Canada, 22 per cent in U.S. and 19.25 per cent in international holdings. “This is a well diversified portfolio for future growth.”

Unfortunately, in today’s low interest-bearing environment, it is hard to find yield in fixed income. “I want to caution her against taking on additional risk in this segment of her portfolio to chase yield.” Preferred shares “are great to have as part of your portfolio, but they behave like equities” – subject to the ups and downs of the stock market – and should be viewed as such when assessing risk, Mr. Evans says.

Lana’s TFSA should be allocated to equities focused on capital growth, he says, because this account is geared for the long term. Eligible Canadian dividends – which benefit from the enhanced dividend tax credit – should be held in non-registered accounts. The RRSP should hold the U.S.-based investments because the Internal Revenue Service recognizes the RRSP as a tax-deferred investment vehicle and so gives a break on withholding taxes that would otherwise be payable on distributions (interest and dividends) from U.S. companies.

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Client situation

The person: Lana, 49

The problem: Does she have enough to maintain her lifestyle to the age of 90?

The plan: Draw from the holding company until the assets are depleted, then draw as needed from RRSP and non-registered accounts until she begins collecting government benefits. Adjust her portfolio to lower risk.

The payoff: Financial security despite an unusually long retirement.

Monthly net income (2019): $6,600

Assets: Cash $33,000; non-registered ETF portfolio $405,000; holding company portfolio $370,300; TFSA $56,700; RRSP $322,300; residence $560,000. Total: $1.7-million

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Monthly outlays: Property tax $375; water, sewer $85; home insurance $35; utilities $305; maintenance, garden $135; transportation $285; groceries $425; clothing $80; gifts, charity $130; vacation, travel $415; dining, drinks, entertainment $620; personal care $35; club membership $5; health care $180; phones, TV, internet $160. Total: $3,270. Surplus goes to savings.

Liabilities: None

Want a free financial facelift? E-mail finfacelift@gmail.com.

Some details may be changed to protect the privacy of the persons profiled.

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Goldman Sachs: The next big investment opportunity – Yahoo Canada Finance

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="It may be time to hit pause on the red-hot big cap tech trade of 2020 fueled by names such as Zoom (ZM) and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) and take a ride on some less exciting industrial and utilities stocks.” data-reactid=”16″>It may be time to hit pause on the red-hot big cap tech trade of 2020 fueled by names such as Zoom (ZM) and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) and take a ride on some less exciting industrial and utilities stocks.

Well, perhaps movers of dirt and sellers of electricity are more exciting investments than one thinks if listening to the new pitch from strategists at Goldman Sachs. The investment bank lifted its outlook on the industrials and utilities sector on Wednesday, citing a host of reasons to get long in a space that had fallen out of favor amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“Industrials should benefit from improving global economic growth and potential infrastructure spending while Utilities’ dividend yield relative to the level of interest rates is near a 25-year high,” writes Goldman’s Arjun Menon. Goldman is looking for 5.6% global GDP growth in 2021, which would be vastly improved from the 5% plunge expected this year.” data-reactid=”18″>“Industrials should benefit from improving global economic growth and potential infrastructure spending while Utilities’ dividend yield relative to the level of interest rates is near a 25-year high,” writes Goldman’s Arjun Menon. Goldman is looking for 5.6% global GDP growth in 2021, which would be vastly improved from the 5% plunge expected this year.

The Dow Transports have come on strong.
The Dow Transports have come on strong.

Menon adds, “Improving global economic growth and low interest rates should also be tailwinds to select cyclical and defensive pockets within the equity market. Within cyclicals, stocks that are most positively correlated with global economic growth should see their businesses normalize faster than companies that are more tied to the domestic economy. Among defensives, low interest rates mean total cash return yields will likely be a key determinant of performance through the remainder of this year.”

Goldman retained its overweight recommendation on information technology, citing attractive fundamentals. It continues to hold bearish views on health care, real estate, energy and materials.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Only until recently have more cyclical areas of the market begun to catch bids. So if anything, Goldman’s upgrade lends validity to a move in markets that hasn’t gotten a ton of attention. Prior to Wednesday’s session, the Dow Jones Transportation Average had risen for 10 straight sessions. The index has quietly outperformed the S&amp;P 500 and Nasdaq Composite this past month (see chart above), according to Yahoo Finance Premium data.” data-reactid=”32″>Only until recently have more cyclical areas of the market begun to catch bids. So if anything, Goldman’s upgrade lends validity to a move in markets that hasn’t gotten a ton of attention. Prior to Wednesday’s session, the Dow Jones Transportation Average had risen for 10 straight sessions. The index has quietly outperformed the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite this past month (see chart above), according to Yahoo Finance Premium data.

Not everyone on Wall Street is sold just yet on Goldman’s call.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“We want to see if it’s more sustainable. If you look at historical cycles, once the economy truly starts to recover it is all about getting cyclical — or the stocks that got beaten down the most during the decline. They tend to rally. Normally we would have seen it by now. Because it’s such a unique recession, we haven’t seen it yet. So eventually, yes, it will be the big trade probably over the next 12 to 18 months,” Ned Davis Research chief U.S. strategist Ed Clissold told Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade.” data-reactid=”34″>“We want to see if it’s more sustainable. If you look at historical cycles, once the economy truly starts to recover it is all about getting cyclical — or the stocks that got beaten down the most during the decline. They tend to rally. Normally we would have seen it by now. Because it’s such a unique recession, we haven’t seen it yet. So eventually, yes, it will be the big trade probably over the next 12 to 18 months,” Ned Davis Research chief U.S. strategist Ed Clissold told Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow Sozzi on Twitter @BrianSozzi and on LinkedIn.” data-reactid=”35″>Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and co-anchor of The First Trade at Yahoo Finance. Follow Sozzi on Twitter @BrianSozzi and on LinkedIn.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flipboard, SmartNews, LinkedIn, YouTube, and reddit.” data-reactid=”49″>Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flipboard, SmartNews, LinkedIn, YouTube, and reddit.

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Southern Sask provincial parks receive investment, including Good Spirit – Yorkton This Week

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The Government of Saskatchewan is investing nearly $8 million for facility and infrastructure improvements in southern provincial parks in 2020-21.  A total investment of more than $14.6 million will be made across Saskatchewan’s provincial parks system this year.
“Whether visiting for a day or a week, there is always so much to see and do in our beautiful parks,” Parks, Culture and Sport Minister Gene Makowsky said.  “With nearly four million visits to our parks in 2019, investing in facility and infrastructure continues to be a priority.  Upgrades and improvements will ensure our parks remain safe and enjoyable spaces for our visitors in the years to come.”
Along with ongoing improvements to washrooms, docks, day-use facilities and signage, upgrades scheduled for completion prior to the 2021 camping season in southern Saskatchewan provincial parks include:
•       Pool building interior upgrades at Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park;
•       Campground electrical upgrades, a new campground service centre and water system improvements at Good Spirit Lake Provincial Park;
•       Shoreline protection at Rowan’s Ravine Provincial Park;
•       A new campground service centre at Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park; and
•       Boat launch upgrades at Moose Mountain Provincial Park.
Upgrades that began in 2019-20 and are now complete in southern Saskatchewan provincial parks include:
•       Swimming pool and related facility replacement at Buffalo Pound Provincial Park;
•       Campground service centre replacement at Danielson Provincial Park and service centre upgrade at Douglas Provincial Park;
•       Campground electrical upgrades at Saskatchewan Landing;
•       Road improvements at Moose Mountain Provincial Park;
•       Boat launch upgrades at Crooked Lake Provincial Park; and
•       Shoreline protection at Elbow Harbour Recreation Site.
From 2007-08 to 2019-20, capital investment and capital maintenance in parks reached a total value of more than $127 million.  Improvements planned for 2020-21 will further increase the total investment to more than $141 million since 2007.  Saskatchewan’s provincial parks continue to be an important destination, attracting visitors and bringing economic benefits to the province.

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Enforcement Notice – Hearing – IIROC to Hold Settlement Hearing for Calgary Investment Advisor Wayne Frederick Workun – Canada NewsWire

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CALGARY, AB, Aug. 12, 2020 /CNW/ – A Hearing Panel of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) will consider whether to accept a Settlement Agreement entered into between IIROC staff and Wayne Frederick Workun.

The Agreement concerns allegations that Mr. Workun failed to use due diligence to ensure that recommendations were suitable for a client and engaged in discretionary trading in that client’s accounts.

The hearing is not open to the public but will become open if and when the Panel accepts the agreement. Members of the public who are interested to attend the hearing may contact IIROC’s National Hearing Coordinator at [email protected] in advance of the hearing to obtain further details. If the agreement is accepted, the Reasons for Decision and the Settlement Agreement will be made available at www.iiroc.ca.

Appearance Date:  The hearing will be held by way of videoconference on August 21, 2020 at 10:00 a.m.

IIROC formally initiated the investigation into Mr. Workun’s conduct in February 2016. The conduct occurred while he was a Registered Representative with the Calgary branch of Leede Jones Gable Inc., an IIROC-regulated firm.  Mr. Workun is employed with Leede Jones Gable Inc.

The Notice of Application announcing the settlement hearing is available at: http://www.iiroc.ca/documents/2020/3a7a4aa3-025f-4cdd-be11-565e40f9d0f2_en.pdf

Documents related to ongoing IIROC enforcement proceedings – including Reasons and Decisions of Hearing Panels – are posted on the IIROC website as they become available. Click here to search and access all IIROC enforcement documents.

*  *  *

IIROC is the pan-Canadian self-regulatory organization that oversees all investment dealers and their trading activity in Canada’s debt and equity markets. IIROC sets high quality regulatory and investment industry standards, protects investors and strengthens market integrity while supporting healthy Canadian capital markets. IIROC carries out its regulatory responsibilities through setting and enforcing rules regarding the proficiency, business and financial conduct of more than 175 Canadian investment dealer firms and their more than 30,000 registered employees, the majority of whom are commonly referred to as investment advisors. IIROC also sets and enforces market integrity rules regarding trading activity on Canadian debt and equity marketplaces.

IIROC investigates possible misconduct by its member firms and/or individual registrants. It can bring disciplinary proceedings which may result in penalties including fines, suspensions, permanent bars, expulsion from membership, or termination of rights and privileges for individuals and firms.

All information about disciplinary proceedings relating to current and former member firms is available in the Enforcement section of the IIROC website. Background information regarding the qualifications and disciplinary history, if any, of advisors currently employed by IIROC-regulated firms is available free of charge through the IIROC AdvisorReport service. Information on how to make investment dealer, advisor or marketplace-related complaints is available by calling 1 877 442-4322.

SOURCE Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) – General News

For further information: Enforcement Contact: Charles Corlett, Director, Enforcement Litigation, 416 646-7253, [email protected]; Media Contact: Andrea Zviedris, Manager, Media Relations, 416 943-6906, [email protected]

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