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Park City Men's Shed weathers storm – Winnipeg Free Press

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With no end in sight for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed is doing what it can to keep its doors open.

After shutting down in March in light of the pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed group began meeting again in late June. 

“We’ve been able to open things up on a limited basis,” explained organizer Fred Bobrowski. “With winter coming up, there aren’t many outdoor activities. So coming to visit and socializing, that’s big.”

Bobrowski got involved in Men’s Shed after hearing a presentation that Doug Mackie, chair of the Canadian Men’s Shed Association, made to the Transcona Council for Seniors. Park City Men’s Shed has been meeting at the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre (180 Poplar Ave.) now for over two years. The group now meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Membership in the group costs $35, $20 of which pays for a membership in the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre, which offers a number of other programs throughout the week. 

“Guys come and do their own thing,” Bobrowski said. “A lot of guys do walking sticks or canes. Some are still doing cottonwood carving. Some guys are making some good sized Christmas table ornaments. Stuff like that. We hope to get some guys in who can provide some instruction.”

The group has moved from the back room where members worked closely together, chatting or taking a break from projects to play crib, to the larger front room of the Active Living Centre. 

“It may be a while before we can do that again, the way things are going,” Bobrowski admitted. “But mostly, the guys come to have a coffee, visit, socialize and have some quiet time to work. It’s not complicated, that’s the beauty.”

While operating with a limited capacity, the space provides plenty of room for members to work on their projects.

“We practise social distancing,” Bobrowski said. “Some guys feel more comfortable with a mask, some don’t, so they make sure they social distance. There’s lots of room. We do whatever it takes.”

Maurice Williamson, an East Kildonan resident, joined the group a couple of years ago. Taking a break from carving walking sticks, he said he enjoys coming out to the group each week, when he can.

Phil Veness, another EK resident, was attending his first meeting on Sept. 21 after hearing about Men’s Shed on the radio. 

“I was looking for something to do,” he said. “Thought I’d try it out.” 

While the woodworking projects are what anchors the group, it’s the fellowship that keeps members coming back each week. The social isolation that resulted during the lockdown in response to the COVID-19 reinforced how important the group is to many members.

“The guys were eager to meet,” Bobrowski said. “It’s good to see them all again.”

However, Bobrowski added that there are a number of members who aren’t comfortable meeting up again just yet.

“It’s just not for them until things are a little safer,” he said.

The Park City Men’s Shed are hosting a tool sale on Sat., Oct. 3.

“If people want some half-decent tools at a good price, we’re here,” Bobrowski said.

The sale, which takes place at 180 Poplar Ave. from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and also includes garden tools, acts as a fundraiser for the group. 

“It helps pay for our costs, wood and stuff like that,” Bobrowski added.

With no end in sight for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed is doing what it can to keep its doors open.

After shutting down in March in light of the pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed group began meeting again in late June. 

“We’ve been able to open things up on a limited basis,” explained organizer Fred Bobrowski. “With winter coming up, there aren’t many outdoor activities. So coming to visit and socializing, that’s big.”

Bobrowski got involved in Men’s Shed after hearing a presentation that Doug Mackie, chair of the Canadian Men’s Shed Association, made to the Transcona Council for Seniors. Park City Men’s Shed has been meeting at the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre (180 Poplar Ave.) now for over two years. The group now meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Membership in the group costs $35, $20 of which pays for a membership in the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre, which offers a number of other programs throughout the week. 

“Guys come and do their own thing,” Bobrowski said. “A lot of guys do walking sticks or canes. Some are still doing cottonwood carving. Some guys are making some good sized Christmas table ornaments. Stuff like that. We hope to get some guys in who can provide some instruction.”

The group has moved from the back room where members worked closely together, chatting or taking a break from projects to play crib, to the larger front room of the Active Living Centre. 

“It may be a while before we can do that again, the way things are going,” Bobrowski admitted. “But mostly, the guys come to have a coffee, visit, socialize and have some quiet time to work. It’s not complicated, that’s the beauty.”

While operating with a limited capacity, the space provides plenty of room for members to work on their projects.

“We practise social distancing,” Bobrowski said. “Some guys feel more comfortable with a mask, some don’t, so they make sure they social distance. There’s lots of room. We do whatever it takes.”

Maurice Williamson, an East Kildonan resident, joined the group a couple of years ago. Taking a break from carving walking sticks, he said he enjoys coming out to the group each week, when he can.

Phil Veness, another EK resident, was attending his first meeting on Sept. 21 after hearing about Men’s Shed on the radio. 

“I was looking for something to do,” he said. “Thought I’d try it out.” 

While the woodworking projects are what anchors the group, it’s the fellowship that keeps members coming back each week. The social isolation that resulted during the lockdown in response to the COVID-19 reinforced how important the group is to many members.

“The guys were eager to meet,” Bobrowski said. “It’s good to see them all again.”

However, Bobrowski added that there are a number of members who aren’t comfortable meeting up again just yet.

“It’s just not for them until things are a little safer,” he said.

The Park City Men’s Shed are hosting a tool sale on Sat., Oct. 3.

“If people want some half-decent tools at a good price, we’re here,” Bobrowski said.

The sale, which takes place at 180 Poplar Ave. from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and also includes garden tools, acts as a fundraiser for the group. 

“It helps pay for our costs, wood and stuff like that,” Bobrowski added.

Sheldon Birnie
Community journalist — The Herald

Sheldon Birnie is the community journalist for The Herald
Email him at sheldon.birnie@canstarnews.com
Call him at 204-697-7112

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This red light means 'go' for medical discoveries – Phys.org

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This red light means 'go' for medical discoveries
UVA’s Hui-wang Ai, PhD, and Shen Zhang, PhD, have developed a simple and effective improvement to fluorescent “biosensors” widely used in scientific and medical research. Credit: University of Virginia

With a little tweak of the color palette, University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have made it easier for scientists to understand biological processes, track happenings inside individual cells, unravel the mysteries of disease and develop new treatments.

UVA’s Hui-wang Ai, Ph.D., and Shen Zhang, Ph.D., have developed a simple and effective improvement to fluorescent ‘biosensors’ widely used in scientific and medical research. The biosensors detect specific targets inside and sets them aglow, so that scientists can monitor and quantify biological events they otherwise could not.

Most fluorescent protein biosensors give a green or yellow glow, but Ai and Zhang have discovered a way to shift the green to red. This comes with big benefits, including making it easier for scientists to monitor multiple targets at a time and to peer more deeply into tissues.

“This innovative method can convert not only existing biosensors, but also any green biosensors developed in the future,” Ai said. “Multicolor and/or multiplexed imaging with cells will thus become widely accessible.”

Lighting the Way

While there are existing red biosensors, they are typically outperformed by their green counterparts. So scientists have been eager to find ways to shift the green color into red, retaining the benefits of the green sensors while adding new ones, such as reducing the visual confusion that can be caused by the natural fluorescence of tissues and cells.

Ai and Zhang found a solution partly by a stroke of luck—or “serendipity,” as they describe it in a new scientific paper. In the course of their regular lab work, they found that adding a particular amino acid, 3-aminotyrosine, to the green biosensor made it turn red. This is simple to do and quite effective, they report. The red version preserved the brightness, and responsiveness of the green sensor, while offering the additional benefits of a red one.

“We modified a panel of green biosensors for metal ions, neurotransmitters and cell metabolites,” Zhang said. “Spontaneous and efficient green-to-red conversion was observed for all tested biosensors, and little optimization on individual sensors was needed.”

The researchers tested their improved on cells that make insulin in the pancreas. They were able to monitor the effect of high levels of glucose on the cells, gaining new insights and giving the researchers new directions to explore.

They hope their quick-and-easy sensor upgrade will offer similar benefits to many other scientists and lines of scientific research.

“It will have lots of applications,” Ai said, “such as acceleration of our understanding of how pancreas controls insulin secretion or how neuronal activity patterns in the brain correlate with complex behavior.”


Explore further

Cell imaging gets colorful


More information:
Shen Zhang et al, A general strategy to red-shift green fluorescent protein-based biosensors, Nature Chemical Biology (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41589-020-0641-7

Citation:
This red light means ‘go’ for medical discoveries (2020, October 20)
retrieved 20 October 2020
from https://phys.org/news/2020-10-red-medical-discoveries.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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Asteroid On Track To Buzz Earth The Day Before The Presidential Election – HuffPost

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An asteroid hurtling close to Earth is on course to buzz the globe the day before the U.S. presidential election.

According to calculations by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the refrigerator-sized space boulder has only a minuscule chance (.41%) of entering Earth’s atmosphere and is likely to be a relatively comfortable — but very close in space terms — 4,776 kilometers (about 3,000 miles) from the center of the Earth when it makes its flyby.

“So if the world ends in 2020, it won’t be the fault of the universe,” astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson said on Instagram Monday:

Asteroid 2018VP1 is hurtling through space at some 25,000 miles per hour. It was discovered two years ago when it was some 280,000 miles away.

If the asteroid entered the Earth’s atmosphere, it would quickly disintegrate because of its small size, per NASA Asteroid Watch. And if that happens, its fiery fall would provide a great light show potentially visible from Earth.

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Starlink's BITS licence approved, still needs spectrum to operate in Canada – Cartt.ca

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Service launch not coming soon… GATINEAU — The CRTC has approved an application by Elon Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) for a Basic International Telecommunications Services (BITS) licence to provide telecom services via SpaceX’s Starlink low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite constellation. The Commission said in a letter dated October 15 and addressed to SpaceX’s chief financial officer, Bret Johnsen, it received 2,585 interventions regarding the licence application, and after considering the submitted comments, it is approving the application and issuing a BITS licence to SpaceX. Getting a BITS licence is not exactly the highest hurdle there is to clear (most are approved…

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