Party of the week: Baroque Ball in support of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto - The Globe and Mail - Canada News Media
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Party of the week: Baroque Ball in support of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto – The Globe and Mail

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Art Bash! Baroque Ball in support of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto

In just three years, Art Bash!, which serves as the Art Gallery of Ontario’s key fundraiser, has taken one of the top spots on Toronto’s fall social calendar. Andy Warhol’s foil-lined New York factory and the wonderfully eccentric style of Venetian arts patron Marchesa Casati (an Augustus John portrait of the flame-haired figure is among the galleries most beloved), inspired the first and second incarnations of the event. For year three, held on Nov. 23, the institution looked to its current exhibition, Early Rubens, and settled on baroque – complete with all things gilded and ornate – as the guiding theme.

Baillie Court on the gallery’s third floor looked rather marvellous, done up for the occasion by party designer Jeff Roick with tables that brimmed with flowers. Overhead hung rather contemporary metal scaffolding that held wonderful digital prints that called to mind Michelangelo’s great ceilings in the Sistine Chapel. Nearby, a substantial still life by Briony Douglas – with beachball-sized oranges and grapes as big as your head – titled Big Baroque was on offer. With speeches kept to a minimum, conversation during dinner flowed. My seatmate was fashion designer Mani Jassal, a bright talent whose spirited spin on traditional Indian dressing has garnered a considerable following and was included in a fashion showcase that popped-up during the evening.

After dinner, dessert was served downstairs in Walker Court under the Frank Gehry-designed staircase. Dotting the perimeter of the space were nude models more commonly seen at the gallery’s popular life-drawing classes (fitting as funds from the eve support AGO programming and education). In the centre of it all was a dancing space, which to my delight, actually saw the soles of Toronto’s big-givers’ shoes. Among them out at this latest, co-chaired by Sonja Berman and Dean Bender: philanthropist Emmanuelle Gattuso; financier Ira Gluskin and Maxine Granovsky Gluskin, who serves as honorary chair of the AGO board of trustees; real-estate developer David Feldman and his wife, Angela, who served on the event committee; AGO board of trustees vice-presidents Andrew Federer, vice-chairman at RBC Capital Markets (RBC served as a presenting sponsor), philanthropist Rosamond Ivey, and Jay Smith (first VP at CIBC Wood Gundy); Christie’s international consultant Brett Sherlock; and of course, AGO director and CEO Stephan Jost and his husband, Will Scott. North of $860,000 was raised during the evening. Early Rubens runs through January 5.

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Brett Sherlock.

Ryan Emberley/The Globe and Mail

Devin Connell and Darcy Morris.

Ryan Emberley/The Globe and Mail

Event co-chair Sonja Berman with Emmanuelle Gattuso.

Ryan Emberley/The Globe and Mail

Lynda Latner and Maxine Granovsky Gluskin.

Ryan Emberley/The Globe and Mail

Marianne Guizzetti and Robin Turack.

Ryan Emberley/The Globe and Mail

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South River's sound art group hosting 19th annual festival – NorthBayNipissing.com

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SOUTH RIVER — New Adventures in Sound Art, also known as NAISA, is presenting the 19th edition of its Deep Wireless Festival of Radio and Transmission Art from now to March 30 at the NAISA North Media Arts Centre in South River.

Deep Wireless opens with Art’s birthday celebrations in mid-January and continues to the end of March with performances, special radio broadcasts, interactive installations and workshops.

 


The experience of radio does not have to be limited to one-way communication (i.e., passive listening). Some of the early innovators of radio thought of it as a two-way interactive medium. This year’s Deep Wireless artists use wireless technology to explore interactivity between participants and the artworks while using the theme of transformation to suggest alternative paths of expression and communication. The installations and performances invite participation, but they also consciously allow for the public’s input to be transformed into unexpected outcomes.

Songs of Ice on exhibit until March 30

Songs of Ice brings together the work of Michael Waterman and Jesse Stewart, two Ottawa-based interdisciplinary artists who have a shared passion for sonic exploration. In this exhibition, they explore the sonic properties of ice in both solid and melting forms while creating a two-way interaction between an outdoor geodesic dome and an indoor exhibition area at NAISA. Elements of the work will be developed through a two-day workshop with students from the South River Public School.

Re-Collect / Re-Told: Your Stories of New And Old until March 30

NAISA will once again present its ongoing collection of stories as told by children, parents and grandparents in the region in this interactive exhibit matched with historic photos of South River to tell the story of our community and our place in the Near North. Come add your voice to the mix. Added to this year’s story collection at the end of February will be A Good Ways North by Peterborough podcaster and radio artist Ayesha Barmania, who will be the first artist-in-residence at NAISA to create a radio art work from the Re-Collect / Re-Told story collection. She will be giving an artist talk and presenting her work on Feb. 29 at 2 p.m.

 


The 2020 edition of the Deep Wireless Festival of Radio and Transmission Art is funded in part by the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council and the Department of Canadian Heritage.

New Adventures in Sound Art is a non-profit organization originally located in Toronto but since 2017 is now based in South River at the NAISA North Media Arts Centre. NAISA produces performances and installations spanning the entire spectrum of electroacoustic and experimental sound art. Included in its productions are: Deep Wireless Festival of Radio and Transmission Art, Springscapes, Sound Travels Festival of Sound Art and the SOUNDplay Festival.

Darren Copeland is the artistic director for the New Adventures in Sound Art. 

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The Outsider Art Fair 2020: 7 Must-See Exhibits – The New York Times

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The Outsider Art Fair, up at the Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea until Sunday, is still one of the best deals in New York: compact, but filled from edge to edge with things to see. You can brush up on the heroes of the genre — work by self-taught artists — with a stunning Henry Darger panorama at Andrew Edlin at booth D14, and a gorgeous, never-before-shown Martín Ramírez drawing of a cowboy on a rearing purple horse at Ricco/Maresca (A11). You can make new discoveries, like the off-center flower paintings of John Maull at Tierra del Sol (B1), or the eye-grabbing shopping-bag paintings of a retired Peruvian parachute trooper who goes by Judá Ben Hur at Gabby Yamamoto/Espacio (B5).

This year, its 28th in New York, the fair has also introduced a diffident handful of curated booths, including the writer and curator Paul Laster’s Relishing the Raw: Contemporary Artists Collecting Outsider Art (A8), in which Mr. Laster teases out suggestive connections between contemporary artists and their own personal collections: It’s like listening to a British Invasion rocker talk about his favorite blues records. Below are seven of my own favorite booths to get you started, but you’re almost guaranteed, just by setting foot in the door, to find something I overlooked.


Booth A5

Philadelphia’s outsider-art titan anchors the front of the house with a formidable selection of work by well-known artists, most notably a spectacular large drawing by the Swiss legend Adolf Wölfli and a group of pastels by the contemporary Australian artist Julian Martin. Pressing so hard that he builds up a layer of brightly-colored dust, Mr. Martin draws bulbous, organic shapes that call to mind an alien typesetter’s case, or pleasantly squishy toys. The top fifth of Wölfli’s circa 1916 colored-pencil drawing is covered in the curious points and loops of old German cursive, but the rest, filled with roads, color wheels, crosses and masked angels, is like a cutaway cross-section of the view under New Jerusalem. The whole universe is there, but it may not be the universe you know.


BOOTH A6

Everyone’s moving in Yuichiro Ukai’s pen-and-marker crowd scenes. Dinosaurs are marching left; samurai are walking, riding, or being carried to the right. Only the occasional cartoon character with a head full of red-bean jelly really stops to take in the scene. It makes for a wonderfully varied texture, but also for a surprisingly nuanced and cynical take on the world’s richness: With multiple, overlapping cultures unfolding at the same time, more is going on around you than you imagine — but good luck ever noticing more than a fraction of it.


BOOTH B10

Most of the fair’s exhibitors are showing multiple artists, but Barron stands out for the self-contained strength of its presentations, most of which could have stood alone: loopy, brilliant acrylics of naked centaurs and coffee cups with breasts by the Tehran-based former professional wrestler Reza Shafahi. The Genoese painter Vera Girivi’s forthright, emotional nudes, in which loose acrylic brushwork orbits precisely expressive eyes. Bold compositions by Winfred Rembert, who learned to tone leather in an Alabama jail. In Mr. Rembert’s rippling panels, crowds of colorfully dressed field hands pick cotton, and men swing hammers on a chain gang. They’re all the heroes of their own stories, but also one another’s context, raising the impulse to fill all available space — a common characteristic of outsider art — to a philosophical pitch.


BOOTH C11

A few years ago, an antique picker sold the gallerist Duff Lindsay a box of carved wooden figures, blocky but weirdly compelling little men and women with unchanging faces and a range of attitudes and clothes. The picker couldn’t identify them. But eventually, thanks to a single French word carved into one piece and an intuition that the work wasn’t European, Mr. Lindsay traced them to Canada, where a retiree named Cléophas Lachance had built an entire village in his backyard in Lafontaine, Quebec, complete with 300 wooden residents, working streetlights and a brothel. From their wood-shaving hair to their little metal glasses, this booth’s selection of visitors from “Le Village Historique du Nord” is not be missed.


BOOTH D4

I was surprised to find Vivian Maier at the fair, but of course I shouldn’t have been. Maier, who worked as a nanny in Chicago for most of her adult life, shot thousands of photographs of street scenes, architecture and herself, but she left most of them undeveloped and died in 2009 unknown. It’s the quintessential outsider story. But you’d be hard pressed to find anything naïve or unpolished about the work itself. An empty milk glass sitting on a stoop alongside a takeout soup container, in one gorgeous black-and-white shot, seems like a high-concept meditation on the nature of marriage; an image of a dispirited young couple leaning against the wall at a party, looking in opposite directions as she fiddles with the strings of three balloons, has at least one novel in it, if not a whole series. (According to the gallery director Karen Marks, a lawsuit about Maier’s estate has been settled, and the photographs are back on the market, with a commission from each sale going into an escrow account managed by Cook County, Ill.)


BOOTH D5

After retiring as a San Francisco municipal bus driver, Robert Kippur (1944-2015) moved to New York and began making enormous, expressionist paintings in a Chelsea loft, ultimately landing on an extreme style of volatile colors and inch-thick, grainy impasto. Four of the five large canvases in this booth’s compelling exhibit date back to the 1980s, though, when the painter’s clanging hellscapes were thinner and more fresh. Motley figures wrestle and dance on what look like blood-red stages and walkways of ice, their colors and features not exactly clashing, but not quite in harmony, either: They’re riots of autonomous details.


BOOTH D7

The Shipibo artists Sara Flores and Celia Vasquez Yui, both of whom live in the Peruvian Amazon, work with patterns traditionally used for clothing and associated with various healing plants. Ms. Flores’s four large ink-on-cotton paintings, covered in repetitive mazes of thin black lines, are strangely soothing, like quiet serial music. Ten gorgeous ceramic animals, made by Ms. Vasquez Yui, are charming and mysterious, particularly a self-possessed black snake and a dignified squirrel holding out one paw. You want to get to know them better, but you’re not sure they return the feeling. (Curated by the Noguchi Museum’s Brett Littman and the Shipibo Conibo Center.)


Outsider Art Fair

Friday through Sunday, Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street, 212-463-0071; outsiderartfair.com.

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Art Is In Bakery take-out to open in Byward Market – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
From an almond croissant and coffee for breakfast to a pizza slice for lunch, foodies can now visit an Art Is In location in the Byward Market.

Art Is In at at 42 Byward Market Square will be open as of Tuesday, January 21. 2020

The new smaller location will focus on take-out items.

‘This one spoke to us, it was kind of meant to be. Honestly, it just happened. We weren’t looking, we saw it for lease, and we just made it happen, said Emma Desjardins, a co-owner of Art Is In Bakery

The Art Is In high quality breads will be offered there.

And similar to the City Centre location, the Byward Market Art Is In will only take Interac for payment.

No cash transactions.

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