Connect with us

Business

'People should not go out' — Pandemic hitting Windsor-Essex harder than ever, top doc says – Windsor Star

Published

 on


Article content continued

Roughly 1,000 of those cases were reported since Nov. 1

WINDSOR, ON. Friday, Dec. 4, 2020 -- This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the breakdown of COVID-19 exposure types in the region as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. (VIA THE WECHU / WINDSOR STAR)
This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the breakdown of COVID-19 exposure types in the region as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. Photo by Via the WECHU /Windsor Star

Approximately 25 per cent of recent cases have no epidemiological link, Ahmed said, meaning those individuals do not have a known exposure source, like a household contact with COVID-19 or exposure through a known workplace outbreak. In other words, a quarter of the region’s cases are being attributed to community spread.

The other most common infection source is household contact.

“When someone is infected, they are potentially infecting pretty much everyone else in their house,” Ahmed said. “Maybe, yes, you are healthy. Maybe you can recover from the virus, but some people cannot…. It’s something to be mindful of in terms of our responsibility in our activities when we are not at home.”

WINDSOR, ON. Friday, Dec. 4, 2020 -- This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the region's rate of COVID-19 infection is roughly 73 cases per 100,000 population as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. (VIA THE WECHU / WINDSOR STAR)
This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the region’s rate of COVID-19 infection is roughly 73 cases per 100,000 population as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. Photo by Via the WECHU /Windsor Star

The case rate for Windsor-Essex is currently 73 per 100,000 population, far exceeding the 40 case threshold that landed the region in the “red zone” with tightened restrictions on social gatherings, among other things.

Wastewater COVID-19 surveillance being performed by a team of University of Windsor researchers shows the prevalence of virus indicators in wastewater — shed by residents in fecal matter — is “clearly surpassing the active cases, so in the next couple of weeks we may see more cases,” Ahmed said.

WINDSOR, ON. Friday, Dec. 4, 2020 -- This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows wastewater data collected by a team of University of Windsor researchers looking at the presence of COVID-19 indicators in the region's fecal matter on Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. (VIA THE WECHU / WINDSOR STAR)
This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows wastewater data collected by a team of University of Windsor researchers looking at the presence of COVID-19 indicators in the region’s fecal matter on Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. Photo by Via the WECHU /Windsor Star

Last week, approximately 6,500 COVID-19 tests were completed in Windsor-Essex, with about four per cent of those tests coming back positive.

To deal with the increased demand for testing, Erie Shores HealthCare is expanding its testing capacity and adding 50 additional appointments to its schedule, Ahmed said. That announcement comes one day after the top public health doctor expressed his concern over a days-long wait for testing appointments in the region.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Retail frenzy as restrictions eased – Winnipeg Free Press

Published

 on



Hundreds of Winnipeggers lined up outside multiple retailers across the city, with one shopper bellowing triumphantly: “It doesn’t even feel like a pandemic anymore — it’s Boxing Day 2.0!”

As the province eased public-health orders to allow the sale of non-essential items this weekend, parking lots filled up quickly Saturday morning.

Shoppers didn’t let the biting snow showers or even the mandated 25-per-cent capacity limits stop them from waiting outside storefronts for hours on end, before they could get in. Malls remained busy well into the evening, with larger outlets allowing up to 250 people at a time.

“Honestly,” Darrien Drewyer told the Free Press, as he queued up outside the Winnipeg IKEA with his young son to pick up a new chair, “I’ve been waiting for this for like months now.”

Drewyer — like all of Manitoba — hasn’t been able to shop for anything but groceries, pharmaceuticals or other essentials since mid-November, when the province enforced strict Code Red measures to curb the spread of COVID-19.

At Polo Park, a security guard said he’d never seen this many cars stacked across the space in tight rows in the many years he’s worked at the mall. “It’s madness,” he said.

“We couldn’t do a lot of Christmas shopping or even Boxing Day or Black Friday properly,” said Nicole Julien, waiting outside the Grant Park Winners outlet.

“I guess this is our chance now because the government finally said you can do it,” chimed in Julien’s boyfriend Henry Siloam, who wanted to purchase a pair of T-shirts he saw at a special in-store discount.

While most other large retailers, such as Costco, Toys”R”Us, Best Buy and Sport Chek were also chock full of customers, independent and small stores did not see the same level of foot traffic.

Just a few steps next to the busy Winners outlet in Grant Park Shopping Centre, which touts up to 70 different storefronts, Northern Reflections and other such outlets appeared barren.

Used DVD store Entertainment Exchange was relatively occupied with customers, however. At one point Saturday afternoon, at least 12 people were waiting to enter, while several others were already glancing over the CDs inside.

“I’m sure the larger businesses are extremely happy with this,” said Jonathan Alward, Manitoba director for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. “But I just wish people would understand that it might actually be safer and even quicker to go support a small business instead of going off to an IKEA instantly.”

Alward hopes, “once people have gotten things out of their system in the following days,” retailers could look calmer. He thinks a lot of it comes from having more than two months of pent-up cabin fever since restrictions were implemented.

According to the newly relaxed public-health orders, all businesses are allowed to reopen and sell anything they’d like, if they’re enforcing strict capacity limits, physical distancing guidelines and mask policies. Restrictions have not been eased for northern Manitoba communities.

The new rules have effectively closed all loopholes that emerged from a repeatedly changed provincial list of “essential” items, which advocates and business owners have argued impacted independent companies more than big-box stores. Smaller shops relied far more on curbside pickups, delivery and online sales — without necessarily having the infrastructure to match larger chains.

Announcing the measures Thursday, chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin said the new rules are meant to “allow increased personal connections, support the well-being of Manitobans… and allow struggling small businesses to get a chance at opening.”

“It all depends on Manitobans,” said Roussin of the current orders that will last at least three weeks. “If we start seeing transmission of COVID-19 again, we’re not going to be able to further reopen.”

Looking at the lineups across the provincial capital on the first day of reopenings, Lisa Malbranck of Diamond Gallery isn’t sure if that messaging has come across for Manitobans.

“You know, they’ve talked so much about this ‘spirit’ of the orders,” she said Saturday. “To me this doesn’t really seem like the spirit of the order when you’re running off and flocking so quickly to the bigger stores.”

At her own store, Malbranck did not see any lineups. Save for the occasional walk-in customers, most people came in after they’d already booked an appointment.

“At the end of the day,” she said, “I just want our community to come together and support the ones these orders are really there for, as we return to some sense of normal again.”

Twitter: @temurdur

Temur.Durrani@freepress.mb.ca

Temur Durrani

Temur Durrani
Reporter

Temur Durrani reports on the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic for the Winnipeg Free Press. Funding for this Free Press reporting position comes from the Government of Canada through the Local Journalism Initiative.

   Read full biography

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Retail frenzy as restrictions eased – Winnipeg Free Press

Published

 on



Hundreds of Winnipeggers lined up outside multiple retailers across the city, with one shopper bellowing triumphantly: “It doesn’t even feel like a pandemic anymore — it’s Boxing Day 2.0!”

As the province eased public-health orders to allow the sale of non-essential items this weekend, parking lots filled up quickly Saturday morning.

Shoppers didn’t let the biting snow showers or even the mandated 25-per-cent capacity limits stop them from waiting outside storefronts for hours on end, before they could get in. Malls remained busy well into the evening, with larger outlets allowing up to 250 people at a time.

“Honestly,” Darrien Drewyer told the Free Press, as he queued up outside the Winnipeg IKEA with his young son to pick up a new chair, “I’ve been waiting for this for like months now.”

Drewyer — like all of Manitoba — hasn’t been able to shop for anything but groceries, pharmaceuticals or other essentials since mid-November, when the province enforced strict Code Red measures to curb the spread of COVID-19.

At Polo Park, a security guard said he’d never seen this many cars stacked across the space in tight rows in the many years he’s worked at the mall. “It’s madness,” he said.

“We couldn’t do a lot of Christmas shopping or even Boxing Day or Black Friday properly,” said Nicole Julien, waiting outside the Grant Park Winners outlet.

“I guess this is our chance now because the government finally said you can do it,” chimed in Julien’s boyfriend Henry Siloam, who wanted to purchase a pair of T-shirts he saw at a special in-store discount.

While most other large retailers, such as Costco, Toys”R”Us, Best Buy and Sport Chek were also chock full of customers, independent and small stores did not see the same level of foot traffic.

Just a few steps next to the busy Winners outlet in Grant Park Shopping Centre, which touts up to 70 different storefronts, Northern Reflections and other such outlets appeared barren.

Used DVD store Entertainment Exchange was relatively occupied with customers, however. At one point Saturday afternoon, at least 12 people were waiting to enter, while several others were already glancing over the CDs inside.

“I’m sure the larger businesses are extremely happy with this,” said Jonathan Alward, Manitoba director for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. “But I just wish people would understand that it might actually be safer and even quicker to go support a small business instead of going off to an IKEA instantly.”

Alward hopes, “once people have gotten things out of their system in the following days,” retailers could look calmer. He thinks a lot of it comes from having more than two months of pent-up cabin fever since restrictions were implemented.

According to the newly relaxed public-health orders, all businesses are allowed to reopen and sell anything they’d like, if they’re enforcing strict capacity limits, physical distancing guidelines and mask policies. Restrictions have not been eased for northern Manitoba communities.

The new rules have effectively closed all loopholes that emerged from a repeatedly changed provincial list of “essential” items, which advocates and business owners have argued impacted independent companies more than big-box stores. Smaller shops relied far more on curbside pickups, delivery and online sales — without necessarily having the infrastructure to match larger chains.

Announcing the measures Thursday, chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin said the new rules are meant to “allow increased personal connections, support the well-being of Manitobans… and allow struggling small businesses to get a chance at opening.”

“It all depends on Manitobans,” said Roussin of the current orders that will last at least three weeks. “If we start seeing transmission of COVID-19 again, we’re not going to be able to further reopen.”

Looking at the lineups across the provincial capital on the first day of reopenings, Lisa Malbranck of Diamond Gallery isn’t sure if that messaging has come across for Manitobans.

“You know, they’ve talked so much about this ‘spirit’ of the orders,” she said Saturday. “To me this doesn’t really seem like the spirit of the order when you’re running off and flocking so quickly to the bigger stores.”

At her own store, Malbranck did not see any lineups. Save for the occasional walk-in customers, most people came in after they’d already booked an appointment.

“At the end of the day,” she said, “I just want our community to come together and support the ones these orders are really there for, as we return to some sense of normal again.”

Twitter: @temurdur

Temur.Durrani@freepress.mb.ca

Temur Durrani

Temur Durrani
Reporter

Temur Durrani reports on the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic for the Winnipeg Free Press. Funding for this Free Press reporting position comes from the Government of Canada through the Local Journalism Initiative.

   Read full biography

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Vaccine eligibility spurs frustration as youngest Albertan, 20, dies of COVID-19 – Calgary Herald

Published

 on


Article content continued

Through Friday, Alberta has administered 98,807 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, including at least 8,304 second doses. It’s an increase of only 1,022 shots from the previous day, a slowdown caused by short supply from a disruption to Pfizer shipments.

On Saturday, the province reported 573 new cases of the novel coronavirus. The infections came from 10,894 tests, representing a 5.3 per cent positivity rate and breaking a three-day streak of positivity rates below five per cent.

Also Saturday, Alberta reported 13 additional deaths from COVID-19, bringing the pandemic’s toll in the province to 1,525.

Two of those deaths were people in their 20s from the Alberta Health Services Calgary zone, a man and a woman. According to Alberta Health, it’s unknown whether the man had any comorbidities, but the woman did not.

One of the newly reported deaths was 20 years old, the youngest Albertan to die of COVID-19. Previously, the youngest person reported to have died from the virus was 23. Seven Albertans in their 20s and another seven in their 30s have lost their lives to the virus.

Hospitalization rates continued a steady decline Saturday. There are now 676 Albertans in hospital with the coronavirus, including 114 in intensive-care units.

The number of active cases in Alberta also dropped to 9,727. The province dipped below 10,000 active cases the previous day for the first time since November.

jherring@postmedia.com

Twitter: @jasonfherring

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending