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Peterborough’s opioid death toll reaches 30 – ThePeterboroughExaminer.com

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Homemade face masks can protect others, but not you: health officials – CTV News Winnipeg

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WINNIPEG —
The increase in demand for personal protective equipment has led to an increase in demand for homemade face masks.

Monday both the Federal and Provincial Government said there’s a benefit to wearing homemade masks when in public.

Dr. Theresa Tam, chief public health officer for Canada, said the Special Advisory Committee for COVID-19 concluded wearing a non-surgical mask can help protect those around you, but it doesn’t protect the person wearing it,

“Wearing a non-medical mask in the community does not mean you can back off of the public health measures that we know work to protect you,” said Tam.

She said we can’t “relax” any of our physical distancing efforts, but added people who want to wear masks as an extra precaution can make them out of household items.

”Simple things, not complicated,” said Tam. “If you can get a cotton material like a t-shirt, you cut up, fold it, (and) put elastic bands around it. Those are the kind of facial coverings we’re talking about.”

Some Manitobans have been pulling out the needle and thread to craft homemade face masks.

Grace Webb, the creator of the Facebook page Face Masks for Manitoba, said she got the idea to sew masks and donate them after reading a U.S. article.

She said the idea snowballed and she started the Facebook group so other mask makers could join her.

“From there it became apparent that people wanted to do this but didn’t have material,” said Webb. “So I thought, why don’t we (build) a kit we can send to people with everything they need to make mask.”

Webb said she’s donating the masks to care homes and people in the community.

Each mask comes with instructions on how to clean them properly, along with a reminder to practice social distancing and wash your hands frequently.

Dr. Brent Roussin, chief public health officer for Manitoba said wearing a non-surgical mask is like coughing into your sleeve.

He said he doesn’t want this information about homemade masks to distract from the most important message.

“If you were staying home before, stay home now,” said Roussin. “Don’t go out now because somebody has said we can use cloth or non medical masks.”

Webb said she’ll continue to sew homemade masks as long as there’s a need.

“I hope it gives them some comfort and a little bit more security,” Said Webb. “I would love to say that we did something to help slow the spread.”

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Erie County offers information on public face masks – Niagara Frontier Publications

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Mon, Apr 6th 2020 08:50 pm

The Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) is making the following announcements.

COVID-19 Data Update

As of 5 p.m. Monday, we have received reports of 1,148 total positive lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in Erie County residents. Of that, 30 Erie County residents have died, and 206 people have recovered. There are currently 912 people in isolation.

We reported 1,149 cases during our live video today. Through our contact tracing process, we discovered that one of those cases is outside Erie County. Our total is 1,148.

Online Case Map

The Erie County Online COVID-19 case mapping tool has been updated with a ZIP code layer. Access this map at www.erie.gov/covidmap.

Cloth Face Coverings

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended cloth face coverings (masks) for individuals when spending time in public spaces, like stores, where keeping a six-foot distance from others is not easy or possible. These coverings should:

  • Fit snugly, but comfortably against the side of the face
  • Be secured with ties or ear loops
  • Include multiple layers of fabric
  • Allow for breathing without restriction
  • Be able to be laundered and machine-dried without damage or change to shape

Most people will be able to make these from materials around their home. There are no-sew methods described in detail on the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html.

If someone is ill with respiratory symptoms, they should wear a cloth covering over the nose and mouth when around other people or in public spaces. Masks can also help people avoid touching their faces – which is another way to reduce the risk of infection.

An important note from CDC: Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

Cloth face coverings are a risk reduction tool and should be used along with frequent hand washing, good respiratory etiquette and cleaning/disinfection of frequently touched surfaces.

Age and Gender Information

The following are tables that reflect the age and gender distribution for cases up to and including April 6.

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Official coronavirus death toll is likely far lower than the reality – BGR

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  • The coronavirus is continuing its rampage across the US, resulting in yet another day of growth in the number of confirmed cases of the virus.
  • The number of confirmed cases, as of Monday afternoon, is now up to more than 356,000, according to the latest numbers from Johns Hopkins University.
  • The US has also seen more than 10,500 confirmed deaths from the coronavirus to-date. However, officials say the official death toll doesn’t include everyone who died from COVID-19.
  • Visit BGR’s homepage for more stories.

As bad as the novel coronavirus outbreak that’s rampaging across the world right now appears — and preparing to plunge the US into its most deadly week yet, as the number of confirmed cases and deaths is expected to start peaking in the coming days — we probably don’t even know how bad it really is.

Health experts and public officials now caution that as grim as the virus’ official death toll has gotten — and it’s gotten pretty grim indeed with more than 10,500 reported deaths in the US as of Monday — it’s all but certain that those numbers don’t account for everyone who succumbs to the coronavirus. For example, the only time the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention attributes a death to the virus is when the virus’ presence has been confirmed via a lab test. This is why CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund has said, when speaking about the current death toll in the US: “We know that it is an underestimation.”

As if that wasn’t bad enough, an assortment of epidemiologists, medical examiners, funeral home directors, and representatives of nursing homes has told The Washington Post that countless people died in the US in the early days of the outbreak — back when testing was still frustratingly limited. And it’s a problem that lingers today in places like nursing homes, where resources and staffing is stretched thin.

But the reasons why the official death toll from the virus is most assuredly undercounting victims don’t even stop there. Some medical examiners think that testing the dead for the presence of the virus is a waste of a test that could be used on someone who’s still alive. Also, even when people do get the test, it sometimes returns a false negative.

This is certainly not meant to cast aspersions on the front-line health care workers who are risking their lives to try and get the pandemic under control. On the contrary, our lack of a complete picture of the virus’ full scope stems instead mostly from decisions made at the macro level, such as in federal officials’ piecemeal and still-insufficient approach to testing, which in turn hampers our ability to get a complete picture of the coronavirus.

“Based on the best recent information about limited testing and sizable false negative rates of testing, we are likely underestimating the number of deaths,” Clay Marsh, vice president and executive dean for health sciences at West Virginia University, told the Post.

Image Source: JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Andy is a reporter in Memphis who also contributes to outlets like Fast Company and The Guardian. When he’s not writing about technology, he can be found hunched protectively over his burgeoning collection of vinyl, as well as nursing his Whovianism and bingeing on a variety of TV shows you probably don’t like.

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