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Police divers recover body of Quebec infant missing in river since car crash Friday

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MONTREAL — Police in the Montreal suburb of Laval found the body on Monday of a month-old infant who had been missing since the car his mother was driving crashed into a river Friday.

The boy was in a vehicle with his mother and four-year-old sister that plunged into the Mille Îles River in a northwestern sector of Laval just before 5 p.m. Friday.

Provincial police divers found the child’s body at about 10:15 a.m. Monday, about three hours after teams began the third day of searching. The mother and second child survived, but police said the mother remained in critical condition Monday.

Const. Stéphanie Beshara said divers found the body at the bottom of the shallow river, not far from where the vehicle entered the water.

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Beshara said the probe is ongoing but investigators believe the crash could have been deliberate. “Certain information leads us to believe that it was potentially a voluntary act by the mother,” she said.

The 40-year-old mother was hospitalized in critical condition and unable to speak to investigators, so they don’t know all the circumstances surrounding the crash, Beshara said.

The four-year-old girl was rescued and released from the hospital Friday evening and is being cared for by family members.

Police spent the weekend looking for the missing baby, with provincial police divers and a helicopter joining local police and fire department teams.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 31, 2022.

 

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Businesses, Canadians feeling financial pressure of inflation | Watch News Videos Online – Global News

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Global National

Canadian businesses are cutting costs and raising prices as profits plummet, while consumers struggle with the rising cost of living. Marney Blunt looks at how everyone is looking to save money, and what credit counsellors are predicting for January 2023.

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Alberta, Saskatchewan chiefs call for sovereignty acts to be withdrawn

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First Nations chiefs from Alberta and Saskatchewan are calling for their provinces to toss proposed legislation they say is inherently undemocratic, unconstitutional and infringes on Indigenous rights.

“We are not looking for change or amendments to the bill. We want it withdrawn,” Chief Tony Alexis said Wednesday on behalf of Treaty 6.

The chiefs are putting forward an emergency resolution at the Assembly of First Nations special assembly to reject sovereignty bills that are before both provincial legislatures.

Alexis, of the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation northwest of Edmonton, said there has been no consultation or dialogue with First Nations around the Alberta bill.

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It has been criticized for giving the premier and cabinet unchecked powers to pass laws behind close doors, although amendments to change that have recently been put forward.

Alexis said the bill is harmful to Albertans and Canadians. He said it infringes on treaty rights and could set a harmful precedent.

“We are deeply concerned that, if passed, it would have a domino effect across Canada,” Alexis said. “And what would keep other provinces from following suit and, ultimately, what will that mean for treaty rights across Canada?”

Vice Chief Aly Bear of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations also said the act in Saskatchewan is unconstitutional. The bill, tabled last month, looks to unilaterally amend the Constitution to reassert the province’s jurisdiction over its natural resources.

Premier Scott Moe has said the act doesn’t affect treaty rights and is aimed at growing the economy to benefit all people, including Indigenous people

Bear said, however, that the proposed legislation creates more harm than good. She said there has also not been consultation with Indigenous groups in Saskatchewan.

“If we want to fix that relationship, we have to be sitting down at the table,” she said.

The chiefs said the federal government has, so far, taken a hands-off approach to the bills and encouraged officials to meet with First Nations leaders from the provinces.

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald said she stands with the chiefs in Saskatchewan and Alberta, calling for the acts to be withdrawn.

She said the bills have a specific agenda around lands and resources and that they infringe on First Nations inherent and treaty rights.

“We will not stand idly by.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 7, 2022.

— By Kelly Geraldine Malone in Saskatoon

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Mint issues black-ringed toonie in memory of Queen Elizabeth II

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Mint issues black-ringed toonie in memory of Queen Elizabeth II

The Royal Canadian Mint is issuing a new black-ringed toonie to honour Queen Elizabeth II.

The mint says the coin’s black outer ring is intended to evoke a “mourning armband” to honour the queen, who died in September after 70 years on the throne.

The mint says it will start to circulate nearly five million of the coins this month, and they will gradually appear as banks restock inventories.

Aside from the black ring, the mint says the coin retains the same design elements of the standard toonie.

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Four different images of the queen have graced Canadian coins since 1953, when she was crowned.

The core of the commemorative toonie will feature the same portrait of the queen that has been in circulation since 2003, with a polar bear design on the other side.

“Queen Elizabeth II served as Canada’s head of state for seven decades and for millions of Canadians, she was the only monarch they had ever known,” Marie Lemay, president and CEO of the Royal Canadian Mint, wrote in a statement.

“Our special $2 circulation coin offers Canadians a way to remember her.”

The mint says it may produce more of the coins, depending on what it calls “marketplace needs”.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 7, 2022.

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