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Police in Ontario fed up with people making social media videos in dangerous places – blogTO

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Peel police have a message for all the young people putting their lives at risk for the sake of a cool social media video: #MakeBetterChoices.

On Sunday afternoon, Peel Regional Police were called to Argentia Rd. and Tenth Line in Mississauga after receiving reports of two young women “laying on train tracks, having a good time and taking selfies.”

After officers arrived in the area, police reported that the two individuals had been filming a dance video for social media. 

“We’re big supporters of the arts,” wrote Peel police on Twitter in response to the incident. “We’re not supporters of people risking their lives for dramatic performances or social media status.”

The two women were given tickets for trespassing, according to police, but they weren’t the only ones who decided to take their lives into their hands by hanging on the tracks that night. 

Later Sunday evening, police received another report of three males “playing on railroad tracks and climbing [a] crossing arm.”

“My déjà vu is kicking in…” wrote media relations officer for Peel Police, Akhil Mooken, on Twitter. 

Fortunately, the three men had already left the area by the time police arrived on the scene, and Mooken wrote on Twitter that he hoped they went home to watch the Raptors sweep the Nets. 

Still, he has an important message for anyone thinking of taking a dangerous, potentially life-threatening risk in order to create cool content.

“I get it. Everyone wants to have clout on social media or be the next big star,” Mooken wrote

“Playing on train tracks however is not the way to achieve that. Playing on train tracks is almost a guaranteed way to get seriously injured, or worse.”

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Pegatron plans to invest $1 billion in Vietnam plant: state media – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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HANOI (Reuters) – Taiwan’s Pegatron 4938.TW> is seeking to invest $1 billion in three phases in production facilities in areas such as computing, communication and consumer electronics in Vietnam, state-media reported on Tuesday.

Pegatron, which is a manufacturing partner of Apple , Microsoft and Sony 6758.T>, had received licenses to initially invest $19 million in the city of Haiphong, the Hanoitimes and Tuoi Tre newspapers reported, citing a report by the Ministry of Planning and Investment.

Pegatron was also seeking licences for a $481-million second phase and $500 million in 2026-2027, the papers said, adding these were expected to create 22,500 jobs and contribute around 100 billion dong ($4.31 million) to the state budget per year.

Reuters was unable to obtain a copy of the report and calls to the ministry were not answered.

Pegatron did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Under the plans, Pegatron would join Apple’s two other iPhone assemblers, Wistron Corp 3231.TW> and Foxconn 2317.TW>, in developing more capacity in Vietnam.

Apple has been producing its wireless earbuds AirPods Pro in Vietnam since May.

Su Chih-Yen, acting director of the Investment Commission of Taiwan’s Economics Ministry, told Reuters it had not yet approved such an investment, but declined to comment on whether they had received an application.

In a bid to skirt U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods, Taiwanese companies have been particularly active in either moving production back home or elsewhere in Asia.

Another Taiwanese company, Universal Global Technology, which produces smartphone and earbuds parts for Lenovo 0992.HK> and Sony, was also looking to set up a plant in Vietnam, Hanoitimes cited the report as saying.

ASE Technology Holding, parent company of Universal Global Technology, did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.

(Reporting by Phuong Nguyen; Additional reporting by Khanh Vu and Jeanny Kao in Taipei; Editing by Ed Davies)

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Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers – Chilliwack Progress

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Friends of Canadian Broadcasting is calling on Parliament to restrain social media platforms from distributing harmful or hateful content by applying the same laws that publishers and broadcasters already face.

The lobby group’s executive director says courts should be penalizing social media platforms that knowingly spread harmful content.

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper that argues social media platforms aren’t passive or neutral when it comes to content distribution.

The report says platforms like Facebook and YouTube routinely exercise editorial control by promoting content that users have never asked to see or sometimes conceal content without consulting users.

The report says traditional publishers can be held partly liable under Canadian law for harmful content but the same standard hasn’t been applied to internet platforms.

Facebook didn’t immediately comment on the research paper or Bernhard’s remarks.

The report was released as members of Parliament return to Ottawa this week and the Trudeau government prepares to lay out its plans for the coming session.

Among other things, Bernhard said that social media tell regulators and advertisers that they have very detailed knowledge of what’s being posted on their platforms and exercise control over what is made available to the public.

“(Facebook CEO) Mark Zuckerberg has claimed under oath that Facebook takes down 99 per cent of terrorist content before a human user ever sees it (and) 89 per cent of hate speech supposedly comes down before a human ever sees it,” Bernhard said.

He said that means Facebook in particular, and social media in general, should have the same responsibility to abide by Canadian laws as conventional publishers and broadcasters.

“If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform has amplified it, the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalty should be commensurate to their revenue and size so it hurts accordingly,” Bernhard said.

David Paddon, The Canadian Press

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Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers – Campbell River Mirror

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Friends of Canadian Broadcasting is calling on Parliament to restrain social media platforms from distributing harmful or hateful content by applying the same laws that publishers and broadcasters already face.

The lobby group’s executive director says courts should be penalizing social media platforms that knowingly spread harmful content.

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper that argues social media platforms aren’t passive or neutral when it comes to content distribution.

The report says platforms like Facebook and YouTube routinely exercise editorial control by promoting content that users have never asked to see or sometimes conceal content without consulting users.

The report says traditional publishers can be held partly liable under Canadian law for harmful content but the same standard hasn’t been applied to internet platforms.

Facebook didn’t immediately comment on the research paper or Bernhard’s remarks.

The report was released as members of Parliament return to Ottawa this week and the Trudeau government prepares to lay out its plans for the coming session.

Among other things, Bernhard said that social media tell regulators and advertisers that they have very detailed knowledge of what’s being posted on their platforms and exercise control over what is made available to the public.

“(Facebook CEO) Mark Zuckerberg has claimed under oath that Facebook takes down 99 per cent of terrorist content before a human user ever sees it (and) 89 per cent of hate speech supposedly comes down before a human ever sees it,” Bernhard said.

He said that means Facebook in particular, and social media in general, should have the same responsibility to abide by Canadian laws as conventional publishers and broadcasters.

“If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform has amplified it, the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalty should be commensurate to their revenue and size so it hurts accordingly,” Bernhard said.

David Paddon, The Canadian Press

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