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Poppy art honours veterans for Remembrance Day – Windsor Star

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Poppies stood row on row in Windsor this weekend — with an artistic flair.

On Saturday, Windsor’s Art Incubator and Coulter’s Furniture held the Poppy Art Campaign, offering more than one hundred works of poppy art by local artists for $50 donations.

The poppy art extravaganza came from an idea by Coulter’s manager Tim Finlay. All proceeds will be donated to The Royal Canadian Legion Ambassador Branch 143.

“This is an incredible way to express our gratitude and remind ourselves why Remembrance Day is observed,” says a news release from the organizers of the event. “These works of art are a beautiful reminder of what we are thankful for.”

Art reflecting poppies for Remembrance Day hang on the wall at Coulter’s Furniture during a Poppy Art Campaign, organized by the Art Incubator and Coulter’s Furniture, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020. Photo by Dax Melmer /Windsor Star
WINDSOR, ONT:. NOVEMBER 7, 2020 - Art reflecting poppies for Remembrance Day hang on the wall at Coulter's Furniture during a Poppy Art Campaign, organized by the Art Incubator and Coulter's Furniture, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020.  (DAX MELMER/Windsor Star)
All kinds of poppies: the Poppy Art Campaign, held Nov. 7, 2020, and organized by the Art Incubator and Coulters Furniture, offer artistic works as a way to honour those who fought for Remembrance Day. Photo by Dax Melmer /Windsor Star
WINDSOR, ONT:. NOVEMBER 7, 2020 - From left, Tim Finlay, manager at Coulter's Furniture, local artist Asaph Maurer, Kayla Reid, executive director at the Art Incubator, and Brad Krewench, a captain in the Canadian Armed Forces, pose for a photo at a Poppy Art Campaign, organized by the Art Incubator and Coulter's Furniture, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020.  (DAX MELMER/Windsor Star)
From left, Tim Finlay, manager at Coulter’s Furniture, local artist Asaph Maurer, Kayla Reid, executive director at the Art Incubator, and Brad Krewench, a captain in the Canadian Armed Forces, pose for a photo at a Poppy Art Campaign, organized by the Art Incubator and Coulter’s Furniture, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020. Photo by Dax Melmer /Windsor Star

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Language and art: new online program launches at the Ellen Art Gallery – Concordia University News

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The Ellen Art Gallery recently launched a new semi-annual, online program. Each instalment of Terms will investigate the manifold meanings of a given word. The program is tripartite, featuring three components.

For the first component, the selected term will be explored in a short essay by a researcher working outside of the visual arts. He or she will examine the term through a particular lens, reflecting on the nuances, ambiguities, and plural meanings of the term.

For the second component, Gallery curator of research and program leader Julia Eilers Smith will pair the term with an existing artwork.

In the final component, a writer from the cultural sector will produce another short essay. Using the artwork as a point of departure, and drawing on the first essay, the writer will further explore various dimensions of the term and its significances.

Each term will be twice presented in this tripartite form — twice in the given year — before another term is selected for the following year.

Terms investigates how various, polysemic meanings are sedimented in words, how terms are disseminated, and how they alter public discourse.

Vulnerability

The first edition of Terms explores the term Vulnerability.

Writer, researcher, community organizer, and activist Mostafa Henaway explores the term ‘vulnerability’ in relation to his work with migrants.

“If there is a term,” he writes, “that evokes a spirit of our moment, it is ‘vulnerability.’”

Henaway depicts our ambivalent notions of vulnerability. The term can sometimes evoke empathy for migrants that are struggling. But ‘vulnerability’ is sometimes considered in terms of the apparent ‘natural’ limits of a person or organism. We see vulnerability as a person’s natural susceptibility to inevitable assaults from the outside.

Henaway makes a case for other conceptions of vulnerability that allow it to be understood as something largely created through our own constructed political, economic, and social world.

He uses this notion of created “structural vulnerability,” exploring how various policies create adverse and exploitive conditions for migrant workers.

Henaway’s essay is followed in the program by a short 1960s film by Canadian artist Joyce Wieland, Hand Tinting.

Arts writer Yaniya Lee develops the exploration of vulnerability through a reflection on the film.

Forming a continuity with the theme of labour, the film is comprised of leftover footage produced by Wieland when she worked at a youth employment training center. The center aimed to teach employable skills to disadvantaged youth.

“Wieland’s task,” explains Lee, “was to film cutaways of the participants during downtime, allowing the recruitment documentary to show the centre’s atmosphere.”

When the company rejected Wieland’s documentary, she made her own film using some of the footage. The film is hand-tinted and perforated in places with a sewing needle.

In her own account of the experience, Lee writes, Wieland was moved by the somewhat pitiful circumstances of the young, mostly black women, while also inspired by their courage and willingness to invest in themselves.

Lee uses the film to reflect on the use of vulnerable subjects as the ‘content’ of film and works of art.

“Wieland ‘got’ the footage to make this film from a paid job; the girls she filmed were at a training centre seeking new opportunities,” Lee points out. “What does it mean to use other people’s bodies as matter” for a work of art?

Lee expresses her mix of admiration and distrust for Wieland’s work, wondering whether Wieland has advocated for vulnerable women or whether she has exploited them.

Lee concludes with a reflection on the relation between subject and work, this time questioning her own vulnerability as the writer making a subject of Wieland’s art.

The second posting of Terms will be launched in late January, 2021, examining vulnerability from another viewpoint.


Find out more about the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery at Concordia.

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PA art show and sale going virtual this year – Prince Albert Daily Herald

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A photo from a previous Kyla Art Show and Sale. The event is being hosted online this year. (File photo/Daily Herald)

A popular Prince Albert art show and sale will be going virtual this year after the pandemic prevented them from hosting an in-person event.

The 42nd annual Kyla Art Show and Sale, typically hosted at E.A. Rawlinson or Plaza 88, will be presented online this year.

A website was specifically created for this event and will feature 15 artists. The sale will have a variety of work available such as paintings, wood burning, wood working, metal work and glass mosaics.

Kim Morrall with the Kyla Artist Group says she’s excited to see how the event will play out this year.

“I have full hopes it will be just as good and successful as our previous shows,” Morrall said.

As a mom of four and an artist herself, Morrall says the annual event pushes her to complete artwork and get involved with the community.

The art sale will launch at 2 p.m. on this Sunday, and run until Dec. 9th at 9 p.m. Artists will be responsible for shipping orders out to customers, Morrall said.

After shutting down for a few days, the website will kick back up again and give people the chance to shop more. Morrall added this is something the group has never done before.

“Most artists like myself we have artwork sitting in our basement…with no place to go and waiting to be sold so this is an opportunity for us to put some of that on there and hopefully have another avenue to sell our work.”

One disadvantage to not having an in-person event is that people won’t be able to speak face-to-face with the artists.

“The personal experience is always going to be better, one of the things people like is being able to meet the artists at our actual shows whereas you don’t get it this way,” Morrall added that the website will include artist photos and information about their work in lieu of this experience.

Another disadvantage is that most shoppers like to see art in person, but Morrall explained that all Kyla artists took good photos of their work.

Past shows have gotten up to 500 people in attendance. Morrall said with the rising number of COVID-19 cases, the group’s main priority was keeping this event safe which is why they decided to host it online.

Ticket sales to past shows have gone to charity organizations. Without an in-person event this year, a silent auction will be held instead with proceeds going towards Prince Albert Optimist Club. Kyla artists each donated an item to the silent auction.

Morrall said the artists group wanted to partner with a local group that did a lot for the community.

“They’re really great to work with and really nice,” she said.

Event information will be shared on the group’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/3556881161010338. The website for the art show and sale is www.kylaartistgroup.com.

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Art sale generates $1900 for Sunrise House – My Grande Prairie Now

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Sunrise House got a helping hand from the art community this weekend. Local artist Grant Berg and Yellowknife artist Robbie Craig teamed up to help raise funds and awareness for the youth emergency shelter.

Berg says Craig had proposed to sell their artwork art at a show, with the intent of donating the proceeds to a local charitable organization.

“It was Robbie’s idea and I was all for it. It’s just… a couple of guys who want to make the world a little bit better in ways that we can, using the tools that we have,” says Berg.

The pair quickly identified a tree which stands in Muskoseepi Park to be their inspiration, as well as a metaphor for the kids who Sunrise House shelters. Berg adds the tree was chosen for its character and unique visual appeal.

“The tree, as weathered as it is, is a stunningly beautiful tree… and Sunrise House takes these children [who] are struggling with the elements and helps them build that character, and come out on the other side beautiful.”

Both Berg’s sculpture and Craig’s painting sold over the weekend of November 21st-22nd. Berg says he donated all of his proceeds, being $900, and Robbie committed $1,000 from the sale to Sunrise House.

He adds Sunrise House was chosen to receive any proceeds, knowing the organization can always use an extra helping hand.

“This organization still exists, it’s battling as hard as it can, and it needs some help too.”

Craig makes an annual visit to Grande Prairie to host an art show and sale. Locally, his mural titled ‘Subarctic Bear’ is displayed in the Montrose Cultural Centre. According to Berg, Craig has also designed a label for Latitude 55 rum, as well as actively designing logos for local businesses and organizations throughout Grande Prairie.

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