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Potential COVID-19 exposure on Montreal flight – HalifaxToday.ca

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NEWS RELEASE
COVID-19/HEALTH/WELLNESS
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Nova Scotia Health Public Health is advising of potential exposure to COVID-19 on one Air Canada flight. In addition to media releases, all potential exposure notifications are listed here: http://www.nshealth.ca/covid-exposures.

Anyone who was on the following flight in the specified rows and seats is asked to continue to self-isolate and immediately visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. You can also call 811 if you don’t have online access or if you have other symptoms that concern you.

  • Air Canada flight 7558 travelling on Jan. 5 from Montreal (1:30 p.m.) to Halifax (4:03 p.m.). Passengers in rows 22-27 seats A C and D are asked to continue to self-isolate and immediately visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. All other passengers on this flight should continue to self-isolate as required and monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. It is anticipated that anyone exposed to the virus on this flight on the named date may develop symptoms up to, and including, Jan. 19, 2021.

Please remember:

Visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to do a self-assessment if you have had or you are currently experiencing:

  • fever or cough (new or worsening)

OR

  • two or more of the following symptoms (new or worsening):

o  sore throat

o  runny nose

o  headache

o  shortness of breath

Please do not go directly to a COVID-19 assessment centre without being directed to do so and do not go to a pop-up rapid testing location.

Currently, anyone travelling to Nova Scotia from outside of the Atlantic Provinces is expected to self-isolate alone for 14 days after arriving. If a person travelling for non-essential reasons enters Nova Scotia from outside Atlantic Canada, then everyone in the home where they are self-isolating will have to self-isolate as well.

When Nova Scotia Health Public Health makes a public notification it is not in any way a reflection on the behaviour or activities of those named in the notification.

All Nova Scotians are advised to continue monitoring for COVID-19 symptoms and are urged to follow Public Health guidelines on how to access care. Up to date information about COVID-19 is available at novascotia.ca/coronavirus

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John Graham, the new CPPIB CEO, already had successful career as a research scientist before joining pension fund – The Globe and Mail

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John Graham started his career after earning a doctorate in chemistry at Western University in 1999.

CNW/Canada Pension Plan Investment B

John Graham, the money manager who is suddenly responsible for at least some of your retirement savings, is something of an accidental chief executive.

The newly named CEO at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board – at $476-billion, one of the world’s largest funds – was only handed the top job on Friday after predecessor Mark Machin was forced to resign after receiving the COVID-19 vaccination while traveling in the United Arab Emirates.

And the 49-year-old Mr. Graham only entered the world of finance after a successful first career in science, as a chemist in the Xerox labs where everything from touchscreen technology to the computer mouse were invented.

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Mr. Graham started his career after earning a doctorate in chemistry at Western University in 1999. The Ottawa native then spent nine years at Xerox doing research focused on photovoltaics, the technology of solar cells. In his time at Xerox, Mr. Graham’s work was the basis for 36 U.S. patents, which must be some sort of record for a Bay Street executive.

Head of Canada’s largest pension fund received COVID-19 vaccine in United Arab Emirates

CPPIB chief executive Mark Machin steps down in the wake of COVID-19 vaccination controversy

‘Corporate world is shifting’: Machin’s swift departure from CPPIB underscores public intolerance for bad behaviour in the C-suite

While working at Xerox, Mr. Graham went back to school part-time, earning an MBA from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. CPPIB recruited him away from the labs in 2008, offering a data-crunching job doing portfolio design. Colleagues say he climbed in the ranks by leading forays into new fields, such as reinsurance and private debt markets.

Former CPPIB chief financial officer Benita Warmbold, who worked with Mr. Graham for nine years prior to retiring in 2017, said the new CEO showed “a consistent knack for building the business.” In 2015, CPPIB paid US$12-billion to buy Chicago-based lender Antares Capital from General Electric, one of the fund manager’s largest foreign forays. Mr. Graham was one of the executives charged with overseeing the investment, as an Antares board member.

“Colleagues at all levels enjoyed working with John, including me,” said Ms. Warmbold. “His humility certainly fits the purpose of CPPIB.” One of Mr. Graham’s first leadership roles was running a 35-person credit investment group. Today, that team has 125 employees, and 42 per cent of the work force is female, a sign of a commitment to inclusion that colleagues say is critical to advancing in a public-sector fund.

In 2018, Mr. Graham took global responsibility for all of CPPIB’s credit-based investments, running a $57-billion portfolio and taking a seat with the 14 senior executives who run the fund manager. In a press release on Friday, CPPIB chair Heather Munroe-Blum said: ”By consistently demonstrating deep knowledge of our operations, embracing a global mindset during his time in Asia, while delivering value as a founder and leader of a key investment department, John earned the Board’s unequivocal confidence.”

The new role will mean a significant raise for Mr. Graham, who is married and has two teenaged children. His predecessor earned $5.9-million last year, while the incoming CEO didn’t crack the fund manager’s list of its five highest paid executives.

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Global National: Feb. 26, 2021 | Health Canada approves Oxford-AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine – Global News

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Global National: Feb. 26, 2021 | Health Canada approves Oxford-AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine  Global NewsView Full coverage on Google News



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Coronavirus: Health Canada approves two AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Health Canada has approved the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine and a related shot by the Serum Institute of India for use in this country with the first doses expected to arrive soon.

Canada joins more than a dozen other countries that have given the green light to ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, the shot from AstraZeneca and Oxford University, which was among the first buzzed-about vaccine candidates in 2020.

A version of the AstraZeneca vaccine by the Indian pharmaceutical company Serum Institute of India and sponsored by Verity Pharmaceuticals Inc. in Canada has also been approved for use and is considered a separate vaccine by Health Canada.

The two-dose vaccines have been approved for use in people 18 years of age and older, including seniors, with the recommendation that the second dose be administered between four and 12 weeks after the first, officials said Friday.

“This is very encouraging news. It means more people vaccinated and sooner,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at a press conference on Friday.

“We’re ready to get doses rolling… With Pfizer, Moderna and now AstraZeneca, Canada will get to more than 6.5 million doses by the end of March.”​

Shipments of the newly approved vaccines will amount to about 24 million doses between April and September. AstraZeneca has promised to ship 20 million doses to Canada from the U.S., with the federal government saying it’s been in talks with AstraZeneca about locking in shipments as soon as the regulatory green light was given. A timeline for the U.S. shipments has not been provided.

Another two million doses will come from the Serum Institute of India, with the first 500,000 expected by the end of March.

As well, officials anticipate 1.9 million doses as part of the global vaccine-sharing program known as COVAX. Advocates for poorer countries have criticized this shipment, saying Canada has procured enough doses through private deals. An initial COVAX batch of 500,000 doses is set to arrive in Canada from South Korea before April.

The inoculants, which are the third and fourth approved COVID-19 vaccines in Canada, is considered to be relatively cheap and easy-to-store, a factor that sets it apart from the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines already in circulation. AstraZeneca has reached agreements with international health bodies and governments to price each dose at about US$2.50. Doses of the AstraZeneca shot can be stored at temperatures between 2 C to 8 C, while the other two require ultra-cold freezers.

“The big, big thing that makes this different than other vaccines, which is a huge, huge advantage, is that it can be stored at refrigeration temperature,” Dr. Zain Chagla, an infectious disease specialist and associate professor at McMaster University, told CTV News Channel on Friday. 

“For a vaccine rollout to go to remote areas, to go to homeless shelters, to go to places that can’t tolerate even a -20 C fridge, this is going to be an incredible tool.”

The newly approved vaccines are the first “viral vector-based vaccines” for COVID-19 to be approved in Canada. This type of vaccine, which uses a modified cold virus commonly found in chimpanzees, has been in use for decades, said Health Canada’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Supriya Sharma, on Friday.

Viral vector vaccines use a “harmless modified version of a different virus — the vector — to deliver instructions to our cells,” she said. “The cells begin to mark proteins from the virus that causes COVID-19, which then prompts the body to develop an immune response.”

The Pfizer and Moderna shots are both messenger RNA technology, which provide a kind of “instruction booklet” for cells to make antigens.

EFFICACY CONCERNS

The AstraZeneca vaccine has already faced efficacy concerns as variants of the novel coronavirus pop up around the world. In South Africa, officials suspended plans to use the shot on health-care workers after a clinical trial indicated it is less effective against the B.1.351 variant predominant in that country.

In France, the vaccine is only being administered to people under the age of 65, as officials cited a lack of data about its efficacy for older people. While Health Canada acknowledged Friday that the clinical trial data was limited for seniors, officials said blood tests showed people over 65 still produced COVID-19 antibodies after vaccination. Plus, the “real world evidence and post-market experience” in countries that have been using the AstraZeneca vaccine showed “a potential benefit and no safety concerns” in seniors.

CTV News Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. Abdu Sharkawy said people concerned about the efficacy of the AstraZeneca vaccines should look to a regular flu season for some “perspective.”

“A great match between a circulating flu strain and the vaccine in a given year might not exceed 60 per cent. If the flu vaccine is delivered widely in the community, we see dramatic reduction in every bad outcome,” he told CTV News Channel on Friday.

“This [AstraZeneca trial] was a multinational trial in five countries and there wasn’t a single death or a single episode of really severe disease really attributable to the vaccine, [which] did a great job in reducing both of those very important metrics. 

While federal health regulators received the application for authorization from Verity and Serum Institute on Jan. 23, they were reviewing the AstraZeneca vaccine for nearly five months in collaboration with the European Medicines Agency. In early February, health officials said they were going back and forth with AstraZeneca about what information the vaccine label will include and cited ongoing trials in the U.S. as one of the reasons the review process for the jab had been “complicated.”

With files from The Canadian Press and CTV’s Rachel Aiello 

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