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Potential COVID exposure on two flights and at two grocery stores

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Nova Scotia Health Public Health is advising of potential exposure to COVID-19 at two locations in the Central Zone and on two Air Canada flights. In addition to media releases, all potential exposure notifications are listed here: http://www.nshealth.ca/covid-exposures.

Out of an abundance of caution and given the current testing capacity available, anyone who worked or visited the following locations on the specified dates and times is asked to visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. You can also call 811 if you don’t have online access or if you have other symptoms that concern you.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 you are required to self-isolate while you wait for your test result. If you do not have any symptoms of COVID-19 you do not need to self-isolate while you wait for your test result.

• Sobeys (1120 Queen St, Halifax) on Jan. 3 between 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. It is anticipated that anyone exposed to the virus on the named date may develop symptoms up to, and including, Jan. 17, 2021.

• Superstore (1075 Barrington St, Halifax) on Jan. 3 between 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. It is anticipated that anyone exposed to the virus on the named date may develop symptoms up to, and including, Jan. 17, 2021.

As a precaution, anyone who was on the following flight in the specified rows and seats should self-isolate and visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. You can also call 811 if you don’t have online access or if you have other symptoms that concern you.

• Air Canada flight 614 travelling on Dec. 19 from Toronto (4 p.m.) to Halifax (6 p.m.). Passengers in rows 26-32 seats C, D, E and F are asked to immediately visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. All other passengers on this flight should continue to monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. It is anticipated that anyone exposed to the virus on this flight on the named date may have developed symptoms up to, and including, Jan. 2.

Anyone who was on the following flight in the specified rows and seats is asked to continue to self-isolate and immediately visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. You can also call 811 if you don’t have online access or if you have other symptoms that concern you.

• Air Canada flight 622 travelling on Dec. 31 from Toronto (7:04 p.m.) to Halifax (9:57 p.m.). Passengers in rows 21-27 seats A, B, C and D are asked to continue to self-isolate and immediately visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to book a COVID-19 test, regardless of whether or not they have COVID-19 symptoms. All other passengers on this flight should continue to self-isolate as required and monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. It is anticipated that anyone exposed to the virus on this flight on the named date may develop symptoms up to, and including, Jan. 14, 2021.

Please remember:

Visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en to do a self-assessment if you have had or you are currently experiencing:

• fever or cough (new or worsening)

OR

• two or more of the following symptoms (new or worsening):

o sore throat

o runny nose

o headache

o shortness of breath

Please do not go directly to a COVID-19 assessment centre without being directed to do so and do not go to a pop-up rapid testing location.

Currently, anyone travelling to Nova Scotia from outside of the Atlantic Provinces is expected to self-isolate alone for 14 days after arriving. If a person travelling for non-essential reasons enters Nova Scotia from outside Atlantic Canada, then everyone in the home where they are self-isolating will have to self-isolate as well.

When Nova Scotia Health Public Health makes a public notification it is not in any way a reflection on the behaviour or activities of those named in the notification.

All Nova Scotians are advised to continue monitoring for COVID-19 symptoms and are urged to follow Public Health guidelines on how to access care. Up to date information about COVID-19 is available at novascotia.ca/coronavirus

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Source: – HalifaxToday.ca

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How COVID-19 has changed daily life a year after Canada's first case – CTV News

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MONTREAL —
On January 25th, 2020, Canadians were still living their lives like they always had: commuting to the office, visiting friends, dining out, hugging loved ones, vacationing. But the announcement that day of Canada’s first COVID-19 case set in motion a chain of events that would soon change everything.

By March, with cases climbing, health officials began implementing a series of measures that would fundamentally alter how many Canadians live. Lockdowns and calls for physical distancing led to companies shifting to work from home, travel restrictions, mask-wearing rules, cancellation of major events, and video meetings replacing in-person interactions as people were asked to avoid seeing anyone, even loved ones.

Jack Jedwab, the president of the Association for Canadian Studies, says the biggest change to Canadians’ daily lives has been the isolation from friends, family and co-workers.

“I think at the root of a lot of that change is these limits on our mobility, which take different forms, whether it’s interacting with family and friends, or seeing people that we’re accustomed to seeing in our daily lives in person as opposed to on screens,” he said.

An online survey conducted for Jedwab’s group in September found that over 90 per cent of the 1,500 people polled said COVID-19 had changed their lives, with most citing the inability to see family and friends as the biggest factors.

While few Canadians have been untouched by the pandemic, Jedwab says women, newcomers to Canada and people who were already economically and socially vulnerable appear to have been among the most deeply affected, particularly by job losses.

Here’s a look at how COVID-19 has changed daily life for some Canadians of different groups:

 

SENIORS

For Bill VanGorder, a retired 78-year-old from Halifax, the pandemic put a temporary halt on his active social life and his favourite pastimes of volunteering in the local theatre and music scenes.

“Theatre people, as you may know, are people who love to hug, and not being able to hug in these times probably has been one of the most difficult things,” he said in a phone interview.

He considers himself lucky, because at least he and his wife Esther have each other, unlike many of his single friends who are completely isolated. Many older people, who are more at risk of severe complications from COVID-19, are struggling to stay connected with family or finding people to help them with household tasks.

VanGorder, who works with the Canadian Association of Retired Persons, also believes unclear government messaging, particularly on when older adults will get access to the vaccine, is “creating huge anxiety and mistrust in the system,” among already-nervous seniors.

But while the pandemic has been hard, he says there have also been silver linings. He and many of his friends have been learning to use platforms such as Zoom and FaceTime, which help seniors stay in touch with relatives and connect with their communities.

“We think the positive thing is that, of course, this knowledge will continue after COVID and will be a real step forward, so that older adults can feel more involved in everything that’s going on around them,” he said.

The first thing he’ll do when things get back to normal is to hug his grandchildren and theatre friends, he said.

 

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

As classes have moved online, many students have had to adapt to living and studying in small spaces and being isolated from friends and campus life at a stage when forging lifelong friendships and social networks can be crucial.

Small living quarters, the inability to travel home, financial fears and uncertainties about the job market have contributed to a “greater sense of isolation” for many students, according to Bryn de Chastelain, an Ontario resident studying at St. Mary’s University in Halifax and the chair of the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations.

While he believes schools have done their best to support students, de Chastelain says many students have seen their mental health suffer.

“A number of students are really struggling with having to learn from home and learn online, and I think that a number of strategies that students are used to taking up are very difficult to replicate in the online environment,” he said.

 

PARENTS

Schools across the country were shut down for several months in the spring, ushering in a challenging time for parents who were suddenly forced to juggle full-time child care, work and keeping their families safe.

The reopening of schools in the fall brought different challenges depending on each province’s COVID-19 situation and approach. In Ontario, some parents opted for full-time online learning, while others were forced into it when Premier Doug Ford chose to extend the winter break. In Quebec, which doesn’t allow a remote option for most students, some reluctant parents had no choice but to send their children back to class.

“I think uncertainty, not only for kids but for everything — work, life relationships and everything — that has certainly been the theme of COVID,” said Doug Liberman, a Montreal-area father of two.

Liberman said the biggest challenge has been trying to balance the health and safety of his family with keeping his food manufacturing business going and maintaining a sense of normalcy for his two girls, ages 10 and 12.

For his family, that has meant trying to spend time outside but also accepting more screen time, and ultimately, taking things day-by-day.

“I certainly think that we certainly don’t have the answer, and I think we’ve done as best as we could, like everybody else has,” he said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 21, 2020.

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Alberta reports 24 COVID-19-related deaths Sunday, including woman in her 40s – Global News

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Alberta Health reported an additional 24 deaths related to COVID-19 and 463 cases of the virus in the province on Sunday.

The positive cases came from 10,237 new tests over a 24-hour period, giving a provincial positivity rate of 4.4 per cent.

READ MORE: 2 people in their 20s in Calgary zone among Alberta’s COVID-19 fatalities Saturday

The active case numbers in the province sat at 9,727 on Sunday.

Hospitalizations were down slightly, with 652 people in hospital — 111 of whom in intensive care.

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Sixteen of the 24 deaths were reported in the Edmonton zone:

  • A woman in her 40s, a man in his 70s, a man in his 90s and two women in their 80s not linked to an outbreak. Comorbidities were unknown in the case involving the man in his 70s and one of the women in her 80s, while the other three deaths involved comorbidities.
  • A woman in her 90s linked to the outbreak at Misericordia Hospital whose death included comorbidities.
  • A man in his 50s linked to the outbreak at Salvation Army Stepping Stones supportive residence whose death did not involve comorbidities.
  • A man in his 70s and a man in his 80s, both linked to the outbreak at Youville Home. Both had comorbidities.
  • A woman in her 90s linked to the outbreak at Laurier House Lynwood whose death included comorbidities.
  • A woman in her 80s and a woman in her 60s, both linked to the outbreak at Capital Care Lynwood. Both had comorbidities.
  • A woman in her 80s linked to the outbreak at Chartwell St. Albert Retirement Residence whose death included comorbidities.
  • A man in his 80s and a woman in her 80s, both linked to the outbreak at Jubilee Lodge Nursing Home. Both had comorbidities.
  • A woman in her 90s linked to the outbreak at Rivercrest Care Centre whose death included comorbidities.

Five deaths were reported in the North zone, all of which included comorbidities:

  • A woman in her 70s linked to the outbreak at Mayerthorpe Healthcare Centre.
  • A woman in her 90s and a man in his 80s, both linked to the outbreak at Grande Prairie Care Centre.
  • A man in his 90s linked to the outbreak at Prairie Lake Supportive Living.
  • A man in his 90s linked to the outbreak at Edson Continuing Care Centre.

There were two deaths in the Calgary zone: a man in his 80s linked to the outbreak at Revera Edgemont and a woman in her 60s. Both cases included comorbidities.

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A man in his 90s passed away in the Central zone. His death was linked to the outbreak at Seasons Camrose and included comorbidities.


Click to play video 'Coronavirus: Hinshaw touts safety of both COVID-19 vaccines'



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Coronavirus: Hinshaw touts safety of both COVID-19 vaccines


Coronavirus: Hinshaw touts safety of both COVID-19 vaccines

READ MORE: Alberta received shipment of 21,450 Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines this week

According to the provincial numbers, a total of 99,047 Albertans received vaccine doses as of Jan. 23.

Alberta Health confirmed the province received a shipment of the Pfizer vaccine last week. That shipment included 21,450 doses.

“With 96,500 doses of vaccine delivered, thousands of the most vulnerable seniors and health-care workers now have an extra layer of protection,” chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Thursday.

On Thursday, Alberta’s top doctor reiterated the province would do its “utmost” to ensure “that every individual who’s received their first dose does get their second dose within the 42-day timeline.

“If not, they’ll continue to be eligible and will receive it as soon as possible after that.”

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Hinshaw said Alberta was working with the federal government and other provinces to use current allocations “as wisely as possible.”

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Doctors reflect on their experience since Canada's 1st COVID-19 case – CBC News: The National

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Doctors reflect on their experience since Canada’s 1st COVID-19 case  CBC News: The NationalView Full coverage on Google News



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