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Prince Harry and wife Meghan cut ties with four British tabloids

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Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, have cut ties with some of Britain’s biggest tabloids and said they will adopt a policy of “zero engagement” with them, British media reported on Monday.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, who gave up their jobs as working royals at the end of last month, sent a letter to The Sun, Daily Mail, Daily Express and Daily Mirror on Sunday evening detailing their new policy, British media, including the Guardian, Financial Times and ITV News, reported.

“This policy is not about avoiding criticism. It’s not about shutting down public conversation or censoring accurate reporting,” the couple’s representatives were quoted by the media as saying.

“Media have every right to report on and indeed have an opinion on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, good or bad. But it can’t be based on a lie.”

The couple said they would no longer “offer themselves up as currency for an economy of clickbait and distortion,” according to the reports.

In its report, the Financial Times said under the new policy, the tabloids would be barred from receiving updates and photographs from the couple, and may also be blocked from attending their media events. (Reporting by Shubham Kalia in Bengaluru; Editing by Christopher Cushing)

Source: – National Post

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Iqaluit woman's daily social media videos offer Inuit-specific 'reasons to stay alive' – CBC.ca

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A young woman from Iqaluit is using social media to advocate for more mental health resources in her community by spreading messages of hope.

Annie Buscemi, 23, an apprentice electrician who has been off work since getting injured in September, started an Instagram and a TikTok account in early October to cope with not being able to work.

Every day on her accounts — ullaakkut (which means good morning in Inuktitut) on Instagram and annieneevee on TikTok — Buscemi posts a video in which she gives one Inuit-specific reason to stay alive.

“I wanted to find a way to keep my mental health healthy and keep my days positive. And when I started this thing, I found a really big difference in my own daily life as well,” she said.

Buscemi said in the last five or six years, she tried several times to talk to a counsellor about her own mental health and has only been able to do so on a couple of occasions.

“Unfortunately, I had to speak to one of them in a hospital, [in] an emergency situation,” she said.

“I’ve had some pretty bad experiences with my own mental health and I found that the mental health resources in Iqaluit aren’t helping me.”

As long as I keep going for myself, I can keep going for other people. – Annie Buscemi

Buscemi said she wants to see more mental health counsellors in Iqaluit and more Inuit-specific youth programs to help young Inuit connect more with their culture.

In the meantime, she decided to take “little steps” like the daily videos she posts, she said.

Impact ‘makes me want to keep going’

Buscemi said she receives messages daily on her Instagram account, which already has more than 600 followers, and her TikTok account that has more than 6,800 followers. People from across Canada and the U.S. thank her for doing the videos.

“Some people have shared their own experiences and how my videos have helped them in their daily lives so I feel like I’m making a pretty big impact and it’s having a big impact on me, too.” she said.

Her latest fan, she said, is her grandmother, to whom she showed her account earlier this week when they had dinner together.

Buscemi said her grandmother spent close to two hours on her couch looking at her videos.

“She was sitting there laughing and sometimes she had tears in her eyes … It makes me want to keep going, like even more,” she said.

Dealing with the pressure

Buscemi started getting recognized in Iqaluit, a city of about 7,700 people, where she said people she doesn’t know have thanked her for posting the videos.

While she appreciates that people like her videos, she also said the recognition and attention leads to pressure.

There are some days, she said, she deals with it by turning off her phone for a couple of hours.

“[It’s to] ground myself … remind myself that I’m doing this for me. 

“I don’t want to start thinking that I’m doing this for other people [although] in a way, I am … I have to keep going for myself. As long as I keep going for myself, I can keep going for other people,” she said.

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Social Media Buzz: Connery Dies; American Rescued; Taiwan Pride – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — What’s buzzing on social media this morning:

Fans of Sean Connery mourned the passing of the original James Bond star on Twitter. The Scottish-born actor, the first to utter the famous movie line, “the name’s Bond, James Bond,” died at 90.

An American citizen who’d been held hostage for several days in Nigeria was rescued by U.S. forces on Saturday, according to the Pentagon. The man, an American missionary, was abducted this week from his home in a small southern Niger village, ABC News reported. President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Michael Pompeo hailed the rescue.

The New York Post is allowed to tweet again. Twitter Inc. earlier locked the newspaper’s account following its publication of a story on Oct. 14 that contained allegations about Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

Bitcoin advocates celebrated the 12th anniversary of the Bitcoin white paper, released by the mysterious inventor Satoshi Nakamoto on Halloween 2008. This week, the price of the largest digital currency rallied to its highest level in almost three years.

Taiwan held its annual pride parade on Saturday, as tens of thousands of people gathered for the world’s largest such event since the pandemic began. More than 200 days have passed without a local Covid-19 transmission on the island.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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Iqaluit woman's daily social media videos offer Inuit-specific 'reasons to stay alive' – CBC.ca

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A young woman from Iqaluit is using social media to advocate for more mental health resources in her community by spreading messages of hope.

Annie Buscemi, 23, an apprentice electrician who has been off work since getting injured in September, started an Instagram and a TikTok account in early October to cope with not being able to work.

Every day on her accounts — ullaakkut (which means good morning in Inuktitut) on Instagram and annieneevee on TikTok — Buscemi posts a video in which she gives one Inuit-specific reason to stay alive.

“I wanted to find a way to keep my mental health healthy and keep my days positive. And when I started this thing, I found a really big difference in my own daily life as well,” she said.

Buscemi said in the last five or six years, she tried several times to talk to a counsellor about her own mental health and has only been able to do so on a couple of occasions.

“Unfortunately, I had to speak to one of them in a hospital, [in] an emergency situation,” she said.

“I’ve had some pretty bad experiences with my own mental health and I found that the mental health resources in Iqaluit aren’t helping me.”

As long as I keep going for myself, I can keep going for other people. – Annie Buscemi

Buscemi said she wants to see more mental health counsellors in Iqaluit and more Inuit-specific youth programs to help young Inuit connect more with their culture.

In the meantime, she decided to take “little steps” like the daily videos she posts, she said.

Impact ‘makes me want to keep going’

Buscemi said she receives messages daily on her Instagram account, which already has more than 600 followers, and her TikTok account that has more than 6,800 followers. People from across Canada and the U.S. thank her for doing the videos.

“Some people have shared their own experiences and how my videos have helped them in their daily lives so I feel like I’m making a pretty big impact and it’s having a big impact on me, too.” she said.

Her latest fan, she said, is her grandmother, to whom she showed her account earlier this week when they had dinner together.

Buscemi said her grandmother spent close to two hours on her couch looking at her videos.

“She was sitting there laughing and sometimes she had tears in her eyes … It makes me want to keep going, like even more,” she said.

Dealing with the pressure

Buscemi started getting recognized in Iqaluit, a city of about 7,700 people, where she said people she doesn’t know have thanked her for posting the videos.

While she appreciates that people like her videos, she also said the recognition and attention leads to pressure.

There are some days, she said, she deals with it by turning off her phone for a couple of hours.

“[It’s to] ground myself … remind myself that I’m doing this for me. 

“I don’t want to start thinking that I’m doing this for other people [although] in a way, I am … I have to keep going for myself. As long as I keep going for myself, I can keep going for other people,” she said.

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