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Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery – Victoria News

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A protest against anti-black violence and racism is set to take place at the Vancouver Art Gallery on Sunday night.

The protest Sunday (May 31) comes after nearly a week of protests in the United States, which were sparked by a Minneapolis police officer seen on video kneeling on the neck of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who died in custody after pleading that he could not breathe. Derek Chauvin was charged with murder Friday, and all four police officers present during Floyd’s death have been fired.

Floyd’s death was the latest in a series of confrontations, assaults and deaths of black Americans. On Feb. 23, Ahmaud Arbery, 25, was fatally shot in Georgia while jogging. On March 13, Breonna Taylor, 26, was killed during a nighttime “no-knock warrant” by plainclothes Louisville police officers. On May 25, a woman called the police on Christian Cooper to tell them he was “threatening [her] life” when Cooper asked the woman to put her dog on a leash in New York’s Central Park.

In Canada, protesters also want answers about Regis Korchinski-Paquet, a black woman fell to her death from a 24th-floor apartment when police responded to a 911 call. Korchinski-Paquet’s death is being investigated by the police watchdog.

Jacob Callender-Prasad, the organizer of the event, called for Sunday rally to be peaceful.

“We do not need to riot in Vancouver, we do not need to destroy our community – that’s not needed here,” Callender-Prasad said in a video posted to the Black Vancouver Instagram page.

“It’s not the same as the United States. We don’t have cops going around causing damage here.”

Callender-Prasad asked attendees to wear face masks and practice social distancing as COVID-19 precautions remain in effect in B.C. He said organizers are expecting between 1,000 and 2,000 people. The protest is scheduled to start at 5 p.m.

Callender-Prasad said Sunday’s event would include a social media shoutout to U.S. President Donald Trump “to ask him to actually push the governor in Minnesota, to push them to charge those other three officers.”

Callender-Prasad said that although police brutality may be more prevalent south of the border, there are still issues in Canada to address.

“We still have instances in Canada of these unwanted and unfortunate events.”

The Vancouver chapter of Black Lives Matter said it was not the organizer of the event but stood in solidarity with those protesting.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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Barrie bylaw demands 10-year-old's Canadian flag art be removed from city property – CTV News

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BARRIE, ONT. —
Erin van Kessel said she was sitting outside her north-end Barrie home Thursday morning when a bylaw officer handed her a warning.

The Barrie resident was told she would have to remove chalk art of a Canadian flag drawn by her 10-year-old daughter to celebrate Canada Day.

“2004-142-2,” recited van Kessel, while looking over the document citing her infraction. The city’s bylaw for that particular code refers to the use of public property.

“No person shall throw, drop, place, or otherwise deposit garbage, paper, paper or plastic products, cans, rubbish, or other debris on any city property unless authorized by the city,” she read.

Van Kessel said large green plastic objects, which may have been children’s items left at the curb near the end of her driveway, did not belong to her.

The issue with the chalk art, however, has left her disappointed.

Van Kessel was told by the bylaw officer someone had complained about the chalk art spray painted on the lawn at the end of her driveway.

The chunk of grass, painted red and white, is city property.

“They couldn’t really say why. I mean, mostly because it is on city property, but really?” said van Kessel in response to the bylaw violation.

Van Kessel was told she had 24 hours to remove her daughter’s chalk painting from the lawn or face a potential fine.

Van Kessel said her daughter is distraught and doesn’t understand why it needs to be removed.

“Not too happy,” said van Kessel. “Because she did put a lot of work into it, and now we have to remove it. It’s a child doing something exciting when she’s been stuck in the house for four months, and no school, no friends, so what more is there to do?”

The City of Barrie confirmed a complaint was made, and a bylaw officer visited the home, providing the following statement to CTV News:

“The city’s enforcement services received and responded to a complaint about individuals painting on city property.

Bylaw officers are obligated to investigate and respond to all complaints received. While the homeowner advised that the paint was washable, the officer was unable to confirm if it was or not, which was why the property owner was warned that they had 24 hours to remove it from the city’s boulevard.

A warning was issued to the property owner, not the child.”

Van Kessel said she does intend to remove the artwork.

“I guess other people don’t appreciate it or look at it the same way we do,” she said.

“What can you do? I guess it’s the way of the world these days.”

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MSS adds three to permanent art collection – Merritt Herald – Merritt Herald

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Janelle Gage.

Three Merritt Secondary students have had their pieces inducted into the MSS permanent art collection.

Kaleb Hall Moses, Janelle Gage, and Sedona Reed all had their art entered into the hallowed hall, a yearly tradition for the MSS art department.

Kaleb Hall Moses.

The collection goes by the name ‘the Margaret Reynoldson Collection.’ The submitted pieces are judged by a jury of art lovers, while the chosen pieces are purchased from the students.

Representatives from the high school said that the current pandemic did not discourage students from submitting their pieces this year, which they originally did digitally.

Each chosen piece is to be professionally framed and given a plaque providing the artist’s name and year of creation.

Sedona Reed.

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Backyard BBQ: How Art of BBQ chef and owner Trevor David makes his Big Bang Brisket – Toronto Life

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Backyard BBQ: How Art of BBQ chef and owner Trevor David makes his Big Bang Brisket

Now that it’s officially barbecue season, we’re asking Toronto chefs to show us what summer dishes they’re grilling in their own backyards, on their balconies or in their kitchens

Like many of us, Art of BBQ chef and owner Trevor David is at home more than usual these days. We asked the social-distancing chef what summer dishes he’s grilling. His recipe: super-tender smoked brisket

Low and slow is the way to go for pitmaster Trevor David’s tender brisket, a fan favourite at his new Scarborough restaurant Art of BBQ. “I came up with my Big Bang Brisket after experimenting in my kitchen. I love combining different herbs and sauces to see what I come up with,” says David. “Exploring through flavours is integral to the process of pushing the boundaries of our taste buds.”

For this particular recipe, inspiration struck when David came across a bottle of oyster sauce in his pantry. “I just had fun with it—added a dash of this and a bit of that—and the brisket came together wonderfully after spending some time in the smoker.” Although David says this was a culinary experiment and there were all kinds of things that could go wrong, it worked. The result was an explosion of flavour. “Kind of like the Big Bang that created our universe,” he says.

David loves the umami hit the oyster sauce imparts to the brisket. “It’s overlaid with the mustardy tang and warmth from the aromatic spices, and then of course you have the crowning glory: the fatty char from the barbecue.”

Good brisket needs equally good sides. David recommends cornbread, rice and peas, coleslaw and a fresh garden salad. “And to wash it all down, I love fresh mango juice or a nice cold beer from Left Field Brewery.”

No smoker? No problem. Skip to the end of this post for instructions on how to make David’s Big Bang Brisket in your oven.

Here’s what you’ll need
Ingredients

1 five-pound brisket
½ cup oyster sauce
½ cup mustard
½ cup puréed herb paste (equal parts fresh ginger, garlic and cilantro)
½ cup cracked black pepper
¼ cup sea salt
5 tbsp allspice
5 tbsp of cinnamon

Plastic spray bottle (for spritzing the brisket) filled with one to two cups with your choice of water, apple juice or apple cider vinegar.

The recipe

Using your hands, rub the sea salt all over the brisket.

Mix the oyster sauce, mustard and herb paste together in a bowl. Then rub it all over the brisket.

Mix the allspice, cinnamon and pepper in a bowl and then—you guessed it—rub it all over that brisket. It’s messy work, but it’s worth it.

Now cover the brisket in plastic wrap and let it marinate in the fridge for 48 to 72 hours. Not patient enough? It’s totally fine to start smoking it now.

Preheat your smoker to about 300°F and place the brisket in. Lower the temperature to 200°F and smoke for about 7½ to 8 hours (this works out to about 1½ hours per pound).

Where there’s smoke, there’s barbecue

Meanwhile, fill a heatproof bowl with water and place it in the smoker. This will help generate moisture. Replenish as necessary.

Let the brisket smoke for two to three hours. Then, spritz it with water (or whatever you filled up your spray bottle with) every 30 minutes. This—along with that bowl of water in the smoker—helps ensure that the brisket stays nice and moist.

After smoking, remove the brisket and wrap in tin foil or plastic wrap. Let it rest for 2 hours.

Slice your brisket against the grain and serve.

David demonstrates how to slice against the grain

Enjoy! (And don’t forget those sides.)

David’s finished brisket, with all the fixin’s
Oven method

Preheat the oven to 350°F. When it comes to temperature, lower the heat to 300°F.

Pour three cups of water or beef stock into a roasting pan.

Place your brisket in the roasting pan, then cover with tin foil.

Slow-cook for about 6 to 7 hours.

Keep an eye on the water level: if it starts to drop, add another cup of water to the roasting pan. Repeat if necessary.

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