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Public Health Sudbury & Districts reporting one new case on Sunday – Sudbury.com

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Public Health Sudbury & Districts is reporting one new case of COVID-19. 

The case (#208) is from Greater Sudbury and is related to an outbreak. The person is following Public Health direction and is self-isolating.

There are 52 known active cases in the area.

Through contact tracing, Public Health will notify all close contacts directly. If you are not contacted by Public Health, you are not considered a close contact.

Strengthened public health measures will come into effect in our service area to help control the spread of COVID-19 on Monday, November 16, 2020, at 12:01 a.m. These measures include limited hours of operations for certain settings, reduced recreational program sizes, additional enforcements and fines, and enhanced education in high-risk settings.

Travel, gatherings, and households

Public Health Sudbury & Districts is reminding everyone that the safest options are to avoid non-essential travel, limit indoor gatherings to your own household, and otherwise be outdoors or go virtual, practise physical distancing, masking, and handwashing, and of course, stay away if you have any symptoms.

As much as possible, Ontarians are encouraged to limit outings to essentials like going to work or school, picking up groceries, attending a medical appointment, or engaging in outdoor physical activity. For all outings, continue to practise COVID-safe behaviours like distancing and wearing a face covering.

Although permissible for up to 10 people indoors and 25 outdoors, in-person gatherings of any size should be limited and should always include distance and masking when distancing is not possible. Limiting our contacts and in-person interactions as much as possible is critical in reducing the spread of COVID-19. Unless people are from the same household, keep 2 metres (6 feet) apart and wear a face covering if distancing is not possible. Face coverings must be worn in all indoor public spaces, and they must also be worn in other indoor spaces where distancing is not possible.

As of October 3, 2020, the Province of Ontario is pausing social circles and advising that all Ontarians allow close contact only with people living in their own household and maintain two metres physical distancing from everyone else. Individuals who live alone may consider having close contact with another household.

Schools and COVID-19

In any instance where a positive case is identified in a school setting, Public Health Sudbury & Districts will work directly with the individual who tested positive, the school board, and school, and conduct timely case and contact follow up and provide direction. To protect the privacy of individuals, Public Health will not routinely identify the school if a case is confirmed in a school setting. Schools boards and schools will communicate directly with the school community in the event of a positive case in a school setting.

In the instance of a confirmed COVID-19 outbreak in a school, Public Health Sudbury & Districts will publicly report the outbreak, identify the affected school, and describe any closures that have resulted from the outbreak. An outbreak in a school will be declared if there are two or more cases of COVID-19 in a 14-day period that have some link with each other, and with evidence that infection occurred at the school.

If individuals are identified as close contacts of a case in a school setting, Public Health Sudbury & Districts will contact them or their parent or guardian directly to provide direction. If you have any questions related to individual schools, please contact the school directly.

For general information on schools and COVID-19, click here or call Public Health Sudbury & Districts at 705.522.9200 (toll-free 1.866.522.9200).

Prevent the spread of COVID-19

-Wash your hands often and when visibly dirty for 15 seconds.

-Cover your cough or sneeze with your arm or a tissue, throw the tissue in the garbage and wash your hands.

-Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

-Continue to practise physical distancing, because any close contact could be a possible exposure to COVID-19.

-Masks or face coverings must be worn in all indoor public places in Sudbury and districts, and they should also be worn in other settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained.

– Avoid contact with people who are sick.

-Self-monitor for symptoms of COVID-19.

-Stay home if you are unwell and get tested.

If you have a COVID-19 symptom or have been exposed to the virus as informed by Public Health or the COVID Alert app, get tested. As of September 24, 2020, the Province of Ontario has updated the eligibility and testing criteria for COVID-19 assessment centres. Stay informed and seek testing if necessary.

Travel information

All residents who are planning to travel should be aware that COVID-19 is still circulating at different levels around the province. The safest options are to stay in the area of your home community or to stay in the region.

– For anyone who has recently travelled, visit the Public Health Agency of Canada website for updates on COVID-19 exposures.

– If you think you have travelled somewhere (within or outside of Ontario) where you may have been exposed to COVID-19, call us at 705.522.9200 (toll-free 1.866.522.9200).

– Anyone who has travelled outside of Canada is directed to self-isolate for 14 days from their arrival in Canada.

Updates about COVID-19 testing, confirmed cases, and outbreaks in Greater Sudbury, the District of Sudbury, and the District of Manitoulin are posted online.

For more information or if you have questions, please visit phsd.ca/COVID-19 or call Public Health Sudbury & Districts at 705.522.9200 (toll-free 1.866.522.9200).

Visit Ontario’s website to learn more about the province’s response to COVID-19.

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COVID-19 vaccine for B.C. expected to roll out in 1st week of January, provincial health officer says – CBC.ca

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If everything goes according to plan, everyone in B.C. who wants the COVID-19 vaccine will be immunized by next September, Dr. Bonnie Henry said Thursday.

The provincial health officer explained that a more detailed plan for vaccine rollout will be available early next week, but the first shots should be available early in the new year.

“We’re going to make sure we are absolutely ready by then,” Henry said. “We are planning to be able to put vaccine into arms in the first week of January.”

She expects that two vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna will begin arriving in B.C. early in the new year but only about six million doses will be available across Canada.

“That’s not enough for everybody,” Henry said.

The first priority will likely be to immunize the most vulnerable populations, including residents of long-term care homes, as well as health-care workers.

Two other vaccines produced by AstraZeneca and Janssen are anticipated in the second quarter of 2021.

“By the time we get into April of 2021, we’re expecting increased numbers of all the vaccines to be available and that’s when we can start offering it to more people across British Columbia,” Henry said.

It won’t be possible to reach everyone at once, so there will have to be a strategy for sequencing who receives it.

“As long as the vaccine continues to come in, as long as the safety and the effectiveness is good … we hope to have everybody done by September of next year,” Henry said.

She has repeatedly said the vaccine will not be mandatory.

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Dr. Henry explains why she banned both indoor and outdoor team sports | Offside – Daily Hive

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A day after hinting that new restrictions would be coming for indoor team sports for adults, today the province announced that both indoor and outdoor team sports are now suspended for adults in BC.

While outdoor activities are typically safer than those happening indoors, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry clarified why sweeping restrictions have been put in place.

“What we have found… is that a number of these adult team sports are really very much social gatherings, as well as sport,” said Dr. Henry. “And unfortunately, those types of gatherings are leading to transmission events that are happening.”

It seems that the problem with beer league hockey is the beer, more than the hockey.

“It’s the locker room. It’s the before, it’s the after,” she said. “It’s the going for a coffee or a beer after a game that has been the most source of transmission. Sometimes it’s very difficult, because much of that is built into the culture of many of the adult team sports.”

Henry told a “cautionary tale” about a hockey team from the interior of BC that travelled to Alberta and brought COVID-19 back to their community, infecting “dozens” of people, including family members and coworkers.

“I mentioned hockey yesterday. We’ve seen transmission events in curling, we’ve seen it with a number of adult team sports. Now’s our time, we need to step back from those, take that temptation, unfortunately, away, and make sure that we’re not giving those opportunities for the virus to take hold, and travel between the different communities as we have seen happen in the last few weeks, unfortunately.

“It was the advice of the team from around the province that this was an important thing that we felt we needed to do now. So that is an additional restriction.”

Dr. Henry said that supervised sports for children have not been the source for the same type of risk and transmission. That’s why kids sports have been allowed to continue for individual drills and training, while maintaining physical distance. But games, tournaments, and competitions have been temporarily suspended for youth sports.

“We recognize, of course, the importance for young people of having these opportunities to participate in sport, and how important it is,” said Dr. Henry, who added that she recognizes that sports are important for adults also.

Dr. Henry said that in the past few weeks and months, about 10-15% of cases have been related to physical and sport activities.

“That’s an underestimate,” she cautioned. “Those are [just] the ones that we know that we have linked.”

Among those cases, “very intense transmission” has been seen in things like spin classes, high-intensity interval training, and hot yoga. Post-game beverages haven’t been the main issue for these activities, but rather heavy breathing and poor ventilation has.

“These are areas where you have groups of people that are close together, very high breathing, high intensity, or lack of ventilation,” she said.

So what can we do to stay active?

Henry mentioned online classes from your local gym as an option. She also encouraged adults to stay active by going for a run or a walk, or playing sports like tennis, golf, and swimming.

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High-risk seniors to get COVID-19 vaccine first in B.C.: provincial health officer – Times Colonist

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VICTORIA — Seniors in British Columbia’s long-term care homes and hospitals will be the first to get immunized against COVID-19 starting in the first week of January with two vaccines, the province’s top doctor says.

Dr. Bonnie Henry said Thursday that vaccines by Pfizer and Moderna will be the first to be rolled out after approval by Health Canada.

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However, Henry said only about six million doses are expected to be available across Canada until March.

“So we won’t be able to broadly achieve what we call community immunity or herd immunity, but that will come,” she said

At least two other companies, including AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson, are in the process of submitting data to Health Canada and regulatory agencies around the world in hopes of getting approval for their vaccines.

“Those ones we hope will be available sometime in the second quarter of 2021,” Henry said.

“We hope to have everybody done by September of next year,” she said of the province’s efforts through “Operation Immunize.”

“By the end of the year, anybody who wants vaccine in B.C. and in Canada should have it available to them and should be immunized.”

Henry said B.C. health officials worked with their federal counterparts Thursday on ways to facilitate the delivery of vaccines as they anticipated various challenges that could come up in the immunization process.

More details will be provided about the province’s vaccine plan next week, Henry said.

She reported 694 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, for a total of 35,422 infections in the province.

There have been 12 more deaths, bringing the total number of fatalities in B.C. to 481.

Henry noted health-care workers are tired from the pandemic as everyone deals with an “anxiety-provoking time,” but that it’s important to stay “100 per cent committed” to getting through the next few months before vaccines are available.

“We know that our long-term care homes in particular are most vulnerable and we know right now it’s the biggest challenge that we are facing,” she said.

Henry has banned all indoor and outdoor sports teams for adults, saying a team in the province’s Interior recently tested positive for COVID-19 after returning from Alberta.

“What we have seen in the past few weeks to months is that 10 to 15 per cent of cases have been related to physical fitness and sports activities,” she said, an estimate based on cases that have been linked.

Most transmissions of COVID-19 among adult involved in sports have been through social activities related to the gatherings, Henry said.

— By Camille Bains in Vancouver

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 3, 2020.

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