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Queen’s art gallery launches its “winter season”, seven new exhibitions – Global News

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If you haven’t paid a visit to the Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s University — now might be the time to do so.

The gallery has changed almost everything with seven new exhibitions. An official launch for its “winter season” took place on Thursday night.

Alicia Boutilier, interim centre director and chief curator, says the feature exhibition is called, “The Pathos of Mandy”, by Canadian and artist in residence Walter Scott.

“Scott’s work explores this slippery state between fiction and reality and the identity of the artist with playful and interdisciplinary works that draw on comics and videography and also drawings.”






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Bader family donates 4th Rembrandt to Queen’s University


Bader family donates 4th Rembrandt to Queen’s University

Another new exhibition, called “Face of the Sky”, features a constellation of artworks from across the collections at the Agnes, Boutilier says.

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“Contemporary artworks, Inuit artworks and works from our African historical collection and our Canadian historical collection, and it traces the on-going fascination with the sky.”

Yet another of the new exhibitions is entitled “B-“Side by Paul Litherland. Boutilier says the Montreal-based photographer had unprecedented access to the little-seen “back-sides” of paintings from the Agnes historical European collection.






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Landmark acquisition of indigenous art for Queen’s Agnes Etherington Art Centre


Landmark acquisition of indigenous art for Queen’s Agnes Etherington Art Centre

“Visitors to the gallery can see in highly realistic detail the labels on the back of the painting and the conservation work that’s gone into the painting and the framing and the various hardware — it really tells the history of that painting as an object,” Boutilier says.

“It’s highly realistic to the extent that we have to ensure that our visitors don’t touch them and try to peel off some of the labels.”

Other exhibitions include “From Tudor to Hanover” — British portraits from 1590 to 1800 — as well as the “Quest for Colour”, Five Centuries of Innovation in Printmaking.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Tiny worlds spark imagination at Art Gallery of Regina – Regina Leader-Post

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Artists Dick Moulding and Ed Finch will bring their creations to life during Monday, Wednesday and Friday afternoons. Moulding makes miniaturized farm machines, among them a baler that makes tiny bales of grass.

Ed Finch stands behind the mechanical rollercoaster he built. BRANDON HARDER/Regina Leader-Post

Finch has fabricated carnival rides, including a tabletop roller coaster, and a replica of the train at Ogema with tiny people inside.

Jason Nelson created a literal tiny world, a globe that rotates on an abstract ocean.

Frans Lotz’s mini jungle gym hearkens to a geodesic dome built for world’s fairs.

Kathleen and Jeff Coleclough made felted bison and horses, which stand among succulent plants. Outdoors, in the gallery’s sunny courtyard, there are more succulents — with more troll dolls hiding among them — and birdhouses in various designs.

These plants are a small consolation for fans of NDH’s annual Secret Gardens Tour, which couldn’t happen last month because of COVID-19.

REGINA, SASK : August 7, 2020  -- A number of planters featuring trolls and succulent plants are on display as part of the Tiny Worlds exhibition taking place at the Regina Art Gallery on Elphinstone Street in Regina, Saskatchewan on August 7, 2020. BRANDON HARDER/ Regina Leader-Post
A number of planters featuring trolls and succulent plants are part of A Tiny Worlds Fair. BRANDON HARDER/Regina Leader-Post

Artists Kristin Mae Evans, Don List, Daniel Paquet and Annalisa Raho also feature in the exhibition, which runs through Aug. 21.

A closing reception will see live performances by Tom Brown, Mohit, Tessa Rae, Aaron Santos, Renz Rivero and Jerry Siphanthong on Aug. 21, 5-7 p.m.

The Art Gallery of Regina is at 2420 Elphinstone St. Current hours are noon to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday. The gallery has adapted to the pandemic, installing hand sanitizer stations and one-way traffic arrows.

More information will be available at newdancehorizons.ca.

amartin@postmedia.com

REGINA, SASK : August 7, 2020  -- A piece entitled 19 COVID trolls is on display as part of the Tiny Worlds exhibition taking place at the Regina Art Gallery on Elphinstone Street in Regina, Saskatchewan on August 7, 2020. BRANDON HARDER/ Regina Leader-Post
19 COVID Trolls, created by Robin Poitras. BRANDON HARDER/Regina Leader-Post
REGINA, SASK : August 7, 2020  -- A tiny jungle gym is on display as part of the Tiny Worlds exhibition taking place at the Regina Art Gallery on Elphinstone Street in Regina, Saskatchewan on August 7, 2020. BRANDON HARDER/ Regina Leader-Post
A tiny jungle gym by Frans Lotz. BRANDON HARDER/Regina Leader-Post
REGINA, SASK : August 7, 2020  -- A piece entitled Earth Ship is on display as part of the Tiny Worlds exhibition taking place at the Regina Art Gallery on Elphinstone Street in Regina, Saskatchewan on August 7, 2020. BRANDON HARDER/ Regina Leader-Post
A piece entitled Earth Ship is on display as part of A Tiny World’s Fair exhibition at the Art Gallery of Regina. BRANDON HARDER/Regina Leader-Post

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An urban art gallery: House of PainT building crowd-sourced map of murals, graffiti in Ottawa – Ottawa Citizen

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It still happens, but not as much.

I think it’s totally fair to complain about tags and vandalism that don’t add to the beauty of a space, but the red tape around creating art, especially when there’s permission, is really unnecessary and I think is to the detriment of our arts and culture ecosystem in Ottawa.

What do you think has led to the increasing acceptance of this kind of art in Ottawa?

When you look at other world-class cities … their graffiti and their murals are a tourist destination. There are a lot of cities in Latin America, Mexico City especially, where there’s just public art everywhere — mosaic art, installations, murals, graffiti — and it’s beautiful and it’s stunning and people go to see that.

Veronica Roy, House of PainT’s festival director, stands in front of a piece of street art in the Glebe. House of PainT has launched a crowd-sourced map of murals and graffiti in Ottawa so people can explore urban art. Ashley Fraser/Postmedia Ashley Fraser/Postmedia

The existence of public murals and public art adds so much character to a city, and I think that for a long time, Ottawa was missing out on that and the municipal politicians and policymakers are now in a position where we’re recognizing that murals and graffiti are an attraction.

(Also,) as millennials are in their mid-to-late 30s and early 40s and we’re coming into these positions of power and influence in our communities and in our professional spheres, the attitude that we have towards graffiti and public art and a lot of different cultural issues is now being taken more seriously, and we have a voice at the table to influence this change.

To your earlier point, there’s now an obvious commercial incentive to allowing this kind of art in cities — it’s a tourism draw, it draws people to different neighbourhoods. Do you think it’s frustrating to people who’ve been involved with this artistic community for years?

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Therapeutic art for sale at Okanagan show – Salmon Arm Observer – Salmon Arm Observer

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The power of art as a therapeutic activity benefiting the mental health of individuals and communities is being showcased at the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Vernon and District 17th Annual Awakening the Spirit Art Show and Sale at the Vernon Community Arts Centre.

More than 20 works are featured including photography, acrylic, pen and ink, and watercolour. Artwork on display is from those living with mental illness who have used art to positively improve their mental health.

“Through art and creativity, we hope to break down some of the barriers and stigma surrounding mental health and mental illness,” said Julia Payson, CMHA Vernon Executive Director. “The show celebrates the creative talents of community members living with mental illness and mental health challenges, who use art to improve their mental health.”

For the past two decades, CMHA volunteer Christine Schmidt has been using art to help her express herself and practice self-care.

“My mother is very artistic; I would always do things with her,” said Schmidt. “In 2000, I took a watercolour class and really got into it.”

Schmidt says she enjoys the discovery of making art.

“It keeps the creative juices going, connects me to nature, and is a way of expressing emotion,” said Schmidt, who has been contributing to the show and volunteering for the CMHA Georgette Thrift Shop for three years.

Schmidt said that prior to COVID restrictions, art was also a valuable community activity to share with others at CMHA.

During restrictions at the beginning of the pandemic, Schmidt spent her time walking, doing photography, cooking, baking, meditating with Insight Timer, and connecting with others over the phone.

She dedicated herself to drawing a picture every day for six weeks.

“It was neat to have a focus, to have something on the go during that time to commit to,” said Schmidt. “I decided to stay calm and collected when BC launched its COVID-19 measures.”

Schmidt also decided to create an art calendar.

“My plan was to take a photo for inspiration and do a drawing each day of the month,” she said. “My unused 2014 desktop calendar was easy to adapt for this project.”

The piece has been submitted to the art show and is available for sale.

The Vernon Community Arts Centre, located at 2704A Highway 6, has generously donated its gallery for the show. The Art Sale and Show runs until Friday, Aug. 17, Monday to Wednesday: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Thursday to Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Daily closures take place from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. for sanitizing.

Due to COVID-19, the show and sale is also being featured online at https://trellis.org/awakeningthespiritartshowandsale.

READ MORE: Vernon CMHA celebrates therapeutic power of art

READ MORE: Vernon CMHA branch discusses events



roger@vernonmorningstar.com

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