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Racism is a pandemic in Canada

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Racism is a pandemic in Canada

Racism is a pandemic in Canada that has been perpetuated for generations. This problem cannot be ignored any longer, and it is time to start taking important steps to fight this pandemic.

The country has a history of colonization, displacement, and mistreatment of Indigenous peoples, and Black Canadians were subject to enslavement, segregation, and discrimination. The Chinese immigrants were also subject to racism and discrimination, including the Chinese head tax and the Chinese Exclusion Act, which restricted Chinese immigration to Canada.

 

The wide-reaching impact on society

Racism can have a detrimental effect on physical and mental health because it can create chronic stress and trauma for individuals who experience it. The constant threat of discrimination, harassment, and violence can lead to feelings of fear, anxiety, and anger, which can take a toll on mental and emotional well-being. Additionally, racism can lead to feelings of isolation, alienation, and low self-esteem, which can contribute to mental health problems.

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On the physical health side, racism can lead to increased rates of chronic health conditions such as hypertension and cardiovascular disease, due to the constant stress and trauma it causes. Research has also shown that racism can lead to poor health outcomes, such as infant mortality, poor birth outcomes, and higher rates of chronic diseases in marginalized communities.

Racism can create barriers for students from diverse backgrounds because it can lead to a lack of representation and cultural understanding in educational materials and resources, as well as a lack of support from educators and peers. This can make it difficult for these students to fully engage in their education and succeed academically. Additionally, racist attitudes and discrimination can create a hostile and unwelcoming environment for students from diverse backgrounds, further exacerbating the barriers they face.

Racism can make it difficult for people of colour to find and retain employment because of discrimination in the hiring process, as well as bias and prejudice in the workplace. This can lead to fewer job opportunities and advancement opportunities for people of color, resulting in higher rates of poverty and unemployment.

Additionally, racist attitudes and discrimination in the workplace can create a hostile environment, making it difficult for people of color to feel comfortable and succeed in their jobs, leading to higher turnover rates and further exacerbating the problem.

 

Steps we can take to fight racism in Canada

One of the most important things everyone can do is educate ourselves about the history of racism in Canada. This knowledge can also help us to identify the ways in which racism is perpetuated today and to develop strategies for combating it.

By understanding the history of racism in Canada, we can also learn about the ways in which marginalized communities have resisted and overcome discrimination and oppression. This can be empowering and helps to build a sense of resilience and solidarity among marginalized groups. Additionally, understanding the history of racism in Canada can also help to dismantle the myths and stereotypes that contribute to prejudice and discrimination.

We must also create spaces where people from diverse backgrounds can come together and share their experiences without fear of judgment or discrimination.

These spaces can also provide a sense of community and belonging for marginalized groups, who often feel isolated and unsupported in predominantly white spaces. Moreover, this type of space fosters empathy, understanding, and a sense of common humanity among different groups.

They can also be a platform for building relationships and coalitions and creating positive change in society. Overall creating inclusive spaces is essential to promote equity, understanding, and mutual respect among different groups.

Finally, we need to actively work against racism by speaking out when we see it happening or challenging systems and policies that perpetuate inequality or injustice.

 

Conclusion:

Racism is a pandemic that needs our attention now more than ever before. We must take responsibility for educating ourselves about the history of racism in Canada so that we can recognize its presence today and work together toward creating an equitable future for everyone living here. Taking action now will help ensure that future generations don’t have to suffer from the same discrimination faced by many Canadians today. Together, let us erase racism once and for all!

 

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Alberta to require 'free speech reporting' after uproar over controversial academic visit – CBC.ca

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Alberta to require ‘free speech reporting’ after uproar over controversial academic visit  CBC.ca

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Canada’s Black population faces varying job prospects despite equal education. Here’s why – Global News

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Canada’s Black population faces varying job prospects despite equal education. Here’s why  Global News

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Inflation in Canada: Finance ministers meet

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TORONTO – The two big spending pressures on the federal government right now are health care and the global transition to a clean economy, Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said Friday.
After hosting an in-person meeting with the provincial and territorial finance ministers, Freeland said U.S. President Joe Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act, which includes electric-vehicle incentives that favour manufacturers in Canada and Mexico as well as the U.S., has changed the playing field when it comes to the global competition for capital.

“I cannot emphasize too strongly how much I believe that we need to seize the moment and build the clean economy of the 21st century,” Freeland said during a news conference held at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

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“This is a huge economic opportunity.”

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Canada needs to invest in the transition in order to potentially have an outsized share in the economy of the future, she said, or it risks being left behind.

This year in particular will be an important year for attracting capital to Canada, she said, calling for the provinces and territories to chip in.

“This is a truly historic, once-in-a-generation economic moment and it will take a team Canada effort to seize it.”

At the same time, Freeland spoke of the need for fiscal restraint amid economic uncertainty.

“We know that one of the most important things the federal government can do to help Canadians today is to be mindful of our responsibility not to pour fuel on the fire of inflation,” she said.

Freeland said these two major spending pressures, which were among the topics prioritized at Friday’s meeting, come at a time of a global economic slowdown which poses restraint on government spending.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to meet with the premiers Feb. 7 to discuss a long-awaited deal on health-care spending. The provinces have been asking for increases to the health transfer to the tune of billions of dollars.

Freeland said it’s clear that the federal government needs to invest in health care and reiterated the government’s commitment to doing so but would not say whether she thinks the amount the provinces are asking for in increased health transfers is feasible.

“It’s time to see the numbers,” Quebec Finance Minister Eric Girard said Friday afternoon, in anticipation of the Feb. 7 meeting.

The meeting of the finance ministers comes at a tense time for many Canadian consumers, with inflation still running hot and interest rates much higher than they were a year ago.

The ministers also spoke with Bank of Canada governor Tiff Macklem Friday and discussed the economic outlook for Canada and the world, said Freeland.

“We’re very aware of the uncertainty in the global economy right now,” said Freeland. “Inflation is high and interest rates are high.”

“Things are tough for a lot of Canadians and a lot of Canadian families today and at the federal level, this is a time of real fiscal constraint.”

The Bank of Canada raised its key interest rate again last week, bringing it to 4.5 per cent, but signalled it’s taking a pause to let the impact of its aggressive hiking cycle sink in.

The economy is showing signs of slowing, but inflation was still high at 6.3 per cent in December, with food prices in particular remaining elevated year over year.

Interest rates have put a damper on the housing market, sending prices and sales downward for months on end even as the cost of renting went up in 2022.

Meanwhile, the labour market has remained strong, with the unemployment rate nearing record lows in December at five per cent.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 3, 2023.

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