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Rare comet graces skies – Alaska Highway News

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A recently discovered comet will grace the night skies over the Peace for the next couple of weeks, before disappearing again for thousands of years.

The Neowise comet, discovered in March by NASA’s Neowise infrared space telescope, reached its closest point to the sun on July 3, which caused the “frozen ice ball” to heat up and burn gas and dust off its surface.

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NASA explains that, “This very close passage by the Sun is cooking the comet’s outermost layers, causing gas and dust to erupt off the icy surface and creating a large tail of debris. And yet the comet has managed to survive this intense roasting.”

What’s more, the astronauts aboard the International Space Station spotted it from their vantage point high above Earth’s atmosphere. 

The Neowise comet seen from the International Space Station. Twiter/AstroBehnken

The comet will be visible for a few weeks, and it can be seen with the naked eye. However, binoculars will make for better visuals. 

The comet is getting brighter as it nears Earth, and it will reach its closest point on July 23, when it will be about 103 million kilometres away.

“It’s a rare delight to see,” said James Di Francesco, the director of Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Saanich. “I don’t think we’ve had a comet as nice as this for the last 20 years or so.”

In the coming week, the comet will be visible in the northeast — to the left of the bright light of Venus — just before dawn. Around July 14, it will become visible close to the horizon looking northwest around dusk.

Di Francesco said the best way to see the comet is to find a dark place with an unobstructed view of the horizon.

Once the comet heads back to the outer solar system, it will take about 7,000 years to complete its path and return to Earth’s proximity, “so enjoy it while you can,” Di Francesco said.

Scientists involved in the NASA mission that discovered the comet said it’s about five kilometres across. Its nucleus is covered with sooty material dating back to the origin of our solar system 4.6 billion years ago.

—with files from Roxanne Egan-Elliott, Elana Shepert

Email Managing Editor Matt Preprost at editor@ahnfsj.ca.

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NOAA scientists discover new species of gelatinous animal near Puerto Rico – CTV News

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Scientists have discovered a new species of ctenophore, or comb jelly, near Puerto Rico.

The newly named Duobrachium sparksae was discovered two and a half miles below sea level by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries research team. It was found during an underwater expedition using a remotely operated vehicle in 2015 and filmed by a high-definition camera.

NOAA Fisheries scientists Mike Ford and Allen Collins spotted the ctenophore and recognized it as a new species. This is the first time NOAA scientists have identified a new species using only high-definition video, according to NOAA.

“The cameras on the Deep Discoverer robot are able to get high-resolution images and measure structures less than a millimeter. We don’t have the same microscopes as we would in a lab, but the video can give us enough information to understand the morphology in detail, such as the location of their reproductive parts and other aspects,” Collins said.

The scientists also said there was another unique quality to the discovery. During the expedition, they were not able to gather any samples, so the video evidence is all they have.

“Naming of organisms is guided by international code, but some changes have allowed descriptions of new species based on video — certainly when species are rare and when collection is impossible,” Ford said. “When we made these observations, we were 4,000 metres down, using a remote vehicle, and we did not have the capabilities to take a sample.”

There are between 100 and 150 species of comb jellies, and despite their name, they are not related to jellyfish at all, according to the NOAA. The species is carnivorous, and many are highly efficient predators that eat small arthropods and many kinds of larvae.

The researchers said that there did not initially get a long look at the animal, so there is still a lot about this new species that they do not know yet. Their findings were recently published in the journal Plankton and Benthos Research.

“We’re not sure of their role in the ecosystem yet,” Ford said.

“We can consider that it serves similar roles to other ctenophores near the ocean floor and it also has some similarities to other ctenophores in open ocean areas,” he said.

The videos are now part of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Collection and publicly accessible.

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You might want to stay up late: lunar eclipse to coincide with November’s Beaver full moon early Monday morning – Toronto Star

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A special celestial event is set to grace Toronto skies early Monday morning.

The November full moon, which is traditionally called the Beaver moon, will coincide with a penumbral lunar eclipse.

This kind of eclipse event happens when the moon crosses Earth’s outer shadow, or penumbra, giving it a reddish brown hue.

Those in Toronto will be able to observe the phenomenon starting 2:29 a.m. ET. The eclipse will be at its peak at 4:42 a.m. ET.

Environment Canada predicts partly cloudy skies at that time, but stargazing enthusiasts may be able to get a glimpse of the moon.

Although the Canadian Space Agency notes lunar eclipses are usually among the most observable because you can see them — quite safely — with the naked eye, with the more subtle penumbral eclipse they recommend using binoculars or a small telescope for the best viewing experience.

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Fourth and last lunar eclipse of 2020 to occur on Monday – Geo News

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A penumbral lunar eclipse is creating only a dark shading on the moon’s face, in this file photo. — AFP

The fourth and last lunar eclipse of 2020, a penumbral eclipse, will occur on November 30 (Monday).

According to Prof Dr Javed Iqbal, of the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA), University of Karachi, the eclipse will take place at 12:32pm according to Pakistan Standard Time.

The lunar eclipse will be seen in South and North America, Australia and Asian countries and will not be seen anywhere in Pakistan.

It will reach its peak at 2:42pm, Dr Iqbal said, adding that the shadow of the eclipse will be removed from the moon at 4:53pm.

The total duration of the eclipse will last 4 hours and 21 minutes, Dr Iqbal said.

The last three lunar eclipses occurred on January 10, June 5, and July 4.

A penumbral eclipse occurs when the Earth blocks some of the sun’s light from directly reaching the moon’s surface. All or part of the moon is covered with the outer part of its shadow, also known as the penumbra.

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