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Rare Tintin comic book art set to sell for millions in Paris – CTV News

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PARIS —
Not even the coronavirus can get in the way of intrepid Belgian reporter and comic book legend Tintin.

Comic book lovers and tourists alike can catch a socially distanced glimpse of a Tintin drawing by Herge in Paris before it goes under the hammer Thursday, estimated to sell between two and three million euros and possibly break the record for the most expensive comic book art in history.

The 1936 work in Chinese ink, gouache and watercolour, was destined as a cover for The Blue Lotus, the fifth volume of the Belgian journalist’s adventures. But it never sat on any book store shelves because it was rejected for being too expensive to reproduce on a wide scale – a victim of its own rare craftsmanship.

“They had to do a four colour process printing, so an additional colour and (the publisher) thought that the comic albums were already expensive and reproducing this cover would increase the production costs,” said comics expert Eric Leroy at Art Curial auction house by the Champs-Elysees avenue.

As the name “Blue Lotus” suggests, the art work places Tintin in Asia. A huge red dragon appears on a black background by the Belgian reporter’s petrified face. It is a prized addition to the universe of Tintin, the subject of recent shows in London and Barcelona, a 2011 Hollywood adaptation, a videogame and an app.

In “Blue Lotus,” Tintin travels to China during the 1931 Japanese invasion to investigate and expose – along with his dog Snowy – Japanese spy networks, drug-smuggling rings and other crimes.

But the huge interest in this work has raised a host of questions among French media regarding the work’s provenance – whether it was a gift to the son of Tintin’s printer or a drawing simply never returned to the artist.

There is no question, however, of its authenticity. On Thursday, Herge, whose real name was Georges Remi, could break the record for the most expensive piece of comic book art at 2.6 million euros that was previously set by himself.

“We set the previous record for the `Pages de Garde’ in 2014 ..it would be fair for this piece to break this record. Herge had done only five comic covers using this technique of direct colour so it’s very rare,” Leroy said.

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Fantasy just one spot on young local artist's exploration of art – Yorkton This Week

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The great thing about art is its diversity.

There are different styles and mediums to satisfy the tastes of varied artists and of those viewing the results.

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For artist Jewel Reynolds, the variety is one of the things which has inspired her creativity.

Obviously fantasy is a preferred theme for you. Why? What is about fantasy you like?

“Iactually started out with realism and a passion for wild cats, like Iwas obsessed,”said Reynolds. “Ididn’t like house cats I only liked wild cats, me and my dad actually painted one of my rooms with all the wild cats you could think of on one wall. It was amazing and Iloved it.

“Meand my siblings would bike ride all the way to the Guzoo which was five miles out of town (she grew up at Three Hills, AB.), and feed the animals, this way we would get a free pass in.

“I would bring my sketch book and just have a day of drawing the animals until it was two then we would bike back.”

But as an artist Reynolds’ focus evolved.

“I also went througha phaseof drawing people,” she said.

“Then Ifound it got borderline boring so I started experimenting.

“Iwould make crazy alien creatures and I found it more fun to come up with stories about places that creature would live, why they needed wings or pale blue eyes, why they looked they way they did.

“Or, just in general coming up with an environment that’s out of this world.

“They just became art pieces Icould explain and share.”

Today, fantastic permeates much of Reynolds’ work, although at only age 30 Reynolds, who has lived in Yorkton since 2016, may yet evolve her work.

Whether she does change her focus, it will just be another step on a path started when she was just a youngster.

“I was interested in art at a really young age because my father, (Robert Sieben), is an artist so I would always draw and colourwith him,” she said.

The passion grew from there.

“Art was always my favouritething to do in school,” said Reynolds.“I used to do lots of crafts and was even encouraged to enter colouring contest and events at a young age.”

Reynolds’ interest in varied mediums started at a young age too.

“My first wood burning was of a lynx drinking water at a watering hole,” she said. “My dad came into my room one day and said ‘Jewel I can trust you right?’, then proceeded to hand me a old school wood burning kit. He just wanted to ensure I didn’t tell my mother and that I didn’t burn the house down or hurt myself. That was in grade eight I do believe.

“I used the back of the original burning kit wood sheets provided, needless to say it snapped in half and I ended up just getting rid of it.”

But the journey had begun.

“My earliest art piece that was recognized in my school was in Grade 5,” said Reynolds. “We ended up painting it on a piece of paper to hang in the gymnasium for a performance, I actually still have a picture of the original art piece, My teacher Miss Wiebe laminated it for me and put a boarder around it.

“I just remember being proud and kinda upset since the paper that the art work was painted on had fallen the night before, and they hung it back up up-side-down.

“I was also recognized for art in Grade 6 and Grade 7 and received medals.”

Gaining some in-school recognition fired Reynolds’s interest farther.

“It wasn’t actually the piece that spurred me it was the people that encouraged me,” she said.“Myfamily was always saying ‘Jewel that’s cool you should sell it and make something of it’.

“Sometimes friends or classmates would say ‘wow that’sgreat. Can you draw me something?’

“I always had a great support from my family, my friends my teacher Miss Wiebe.”

And the encouragement continues to help.

“Finally I created my first painting collection due to my great partner Caleb Campbell,” said Reynolds. “So many times Ihave asked him his thoughts or advice about things.

“He also encourages me to finish projects and art pieces before Iwould just give up and walk away.”

But, where does Reynolds gain her inspiration, especially as her work takes on a fantastical focus?

“Sometimes Ihave dreams that are so wacky and random, but some of my art has come from those dreams,” she said.

“Some art Ihave painted is inspired by photos or just little cute things Irun across via social media.

“But most is just from my imagination.

“Some of my art work coming out now Ihave actually done while super young but held onto because Iwanted to make its day-view into the world as wondrous as Ienvisioned, and wanted to work out all the kinks and mishaps before Iput it out there.”

So does Reynolds have a favourite among her works?

“Honestly this is impossible to answer,” she said. “Ihave done art my entire life and Idon’t think I can pick a favourite.

“A lot of my older stuff was not as good as where I am today with my own style and likes, so more current work is more my favourite.

“Honestly, I cant tell you which one I like more because Ilike each one for their own reasons.

“And, Ifind them all beautiful in their own way.”

It’s much the same when it comes to what medium she likes best.

“I have tried tons of mediums,Isew, draw with markers, pencil crayons, carve, resin, paint with acrylic, oil or watercolour,” said Reynolds. “Ieven recently started trying upholstery and tattooing.

“Ijust like learning new things, and Idon’t think Iwill ever stop trying new things. All of the mediums I’veused so far Ilove. Ican’tpick one over the other.”

Now Reynolds is taking another step, putting her creations out there for the public to purchase. It was not an easy step to take.

“Honestly yes I’mhorrible at advertising myself and not much confidence when meeting new people,” she said. “I just recently was encouraged by Caleb to try and he gives me the confidence to even just put it out their. I’m kinda a recluse when it comes to going out; it’sonly to replenish my stash of crafts or tools and Istruggle with talking about my art work.

“More or less I hoping my art speaks for itself.”

Anyone interested in her works can contact hervia Facebook or email at jewel.squared@gmail.com

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Will Online Art Auctions Be 2021's Hot New Trend in the Art World? – Yahoo Finance

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Park West Gallery, the world’s largest art dealer, is thriving and breaking records with their new live-streaming online auctions.

SOUTHFIELD, Mich., Jan. 19, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Has the global pandemic changed how people are buying art? There is growing evidence to show that art collectors are enthusiastically embracing online auctions as an appealing and safe alternative to purchasing art in-person.

Park West Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter auctions off two paintings by artist Jon Rattenbury.
Park West Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter auctions off two paintings by artist Jon Rattenbury.

Park West Gallery was one of the first art dealers to pivot to online auctions during the earliest days of the COVID-19 outbreak. Founded in 1969, Park West is the largest art dealer in the world and they have been holding live-streaming online auctions for their collectors over the past nine months.

“We knew collectors would love our new online experience,” said Park West Gallery Founder and CEO Albert Scaglione. “But what we didn’t anticipate is how quickly that segment of our business would grow.”

Since the start of 2021, Park West has seen record sales and attendance at their online auctions. In fact, over the January 15-17 weekend, the gallery sold 1,559 works of art, the largest number of works that Park West has ever sold during an online auction weekend—breaking their previous record set only two weeks ago on New Year’s weekend when a special three-year-old guest auctioneer brought down the hammer on the record-breaking sale.

“There are many benefits of auctioning art online,” said Scaglione. “One of the biggest benefits is the selection you can offer. When we’re auctioning at an event or on a cruise ship, there is a finite amount of art we can fit into the space. But, when we’re online, the variety of art that we can offer to our clients is simply incredible. And we’re taking advantage of that every week.”

One of the highlights of this past weekend was record-breaking sales from two of Park West’s hottest new artists, Ashton Howard and Jon Rattenbury. Howard is a Florida native who has won critical acclaim for his works of “Fluid Realism”—a technique he invented that captures the light and movement of water in a truly unique fashion. Jon Rattenbury, a popular contemporary artist, is well-known for his “dimensional acrylic” paintings, which give his landscapes an otherworldly level of texture and depth.

The January 15-17 weekend also saw record sales for works by the late great Jean-Claude Picot, the renowned Post-Impressionist who passed away in August 2020.

“We’ve really seen a huge uptick in our online art auctions in 2021,” said Park West Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter. “I had a client last weekend who knew us from our cruise auctions who had never attended one of our online auctions before. She saw some of our recent press coverage and decided to attend her first one. She ended up spending over $100,000! Art collectors are really responding to this new format.”

This new surge in online art collecting aligns with 2020 research from Barron’s, the Dow Jones & Company magazine, which noted that the COVID-19 crisis could fundamentally boost online art sales and predicted that the shift to online platforms for art collecting could be “both permanent and transformative.”

About Park West Gallery

Park West Gallery is the world’s largest art dealer, bringing the experience of collecting fine art to more than 3 million customers since 1969. Whether it’s masterpieces from history’s greatest artists or the latest artwork from leading contemporary icons, Park West offers something for everyone through its accessible art exhibitions and auctions all over the world. You can learn more about Park West Gallery and its over 50-year history at http://www.parkwestgallery.com

Park West also hosts live-streaming online art auctions every weekend. To learn more about Park West’s online collecting events, visit https://www.parkwestgallery.com/online/

CONTACT: Tom Burns
tburns@parkwestgallery.com

Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter tells viewers about an original work by Florida artist Ashton Howard.Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter tells viewers about an original work by Florida artist Ashton Howard.
Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter tells viewers about an original work by Florida artist Ashton Howard.
Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter and Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro hosted the gallery's record-breaking January 15-17 online auction weekend.Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter and Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro hosted the gallery's record-breaking January 15-17 online auction weekend.
Principal Auctioneer Jordan Sitter and Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro hosted the gallery’s record-breaking January 15-17 online auction weekend.
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View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/will-online-art-auctions-be-2021s-hot-new-trend-in-the-art-world-301210933.html

SOURCE Park West Gallery

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What is art? – The Concordian

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Art has long been a disputed form of self-expression. The topic has garnered debate among philosophers, art historians, and artists, and even has an entire Wikipedia page dedicated to its controversiality.

Many jokes and memes have been made around the notion of art’s subjectivity. Books, such as Leo Tolstoy’s What is art? have attempted to answer the question, while Instagram accounts such as freeze_magazine poke fun at and ridicule how absurd the art industry can often be. And you’ve definitely seen the prank where a group of friends placed eyeglasses on the floor of the museum to observe viewers’ reactions and point out how almost anything can be considered art.

This dispute has veered towards problematic for the reason that it ultimately validates an artist’s career. What one might deem to be worth thousands of dollars can be viewed as a piece of old junk to another. We’ve all heard of the stories of someone selling a famous painting for close to nothing in a garage sale, merely because they did not know its “worth.”

So, let’s look at this etymologically. “Art” is derived from the Latin “ars” meaning “acquired skill” or “craft.” In this sense, it is commonly understood that art requires a certain level of skill in order to achieve a desired aesthetic result. Herein lies the problem. “Aesthetic,” like the notion of “beauty,” is inherently subjective.

Dadaism is an ideal example because it, at its core, rejected standard notions of aestheticism and poked fun at art in society. Let’s take, for example, Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades. The acclaimed artist began using and presenting everyday objects as pieces of art. This absurd approach to art-making helped redefine what could be considered art and challenged the idea that art had to be something beautiful and visually appealing. Instead, demonstrating that art could be intellectually appealing.

Constantin Brâncuși’s infamous 1923 work Bird in Space (L’Oiseau dans l’espace) is another prime example of the challenges in defining an object as art. The sculpture faced a number of legal controversies when the artist tried to have it shipped to the United States. Customs officers did not believe that the work was art — art, at the time, was not subject to import taxes — and instead were charged with a 40 per cent tax for “manufactured metal objects.”

According to an article titled Is it Art? published by Harvard Law, after a number of years of legal debate, Brâncuși’s Bird in Space was part of the first court decision stating that “non-representational sculpture could be considered art.” In part, on the basis that the artist intended for the sculpture to resemble the movement of a bird.

Intention brings us back to the eyeglasses meme mentioned earlier. Had the glasses been placed on a coffee table in your home, you wouldn’t have thought much of them. Having been placed on the floor of the gallery, viewers automatically begin to search for a meaning and begin to decipher what they believe the artist’s intention was.

For this reason, art is and will remain subjective. While there may never be one true answer as to what constitutes art, one thing is certain: it is personal, self-informed, and different for everyone. So, what do you consider a work of art?

Graphic by Taylor Reddam


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