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Richmond senior home gets new recycled art installation – Richmond News

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Plastic bags often go into the dump or are occasionally used to hold other garbage, but a Metro Vancouver artist is using them as material to create a three-dimensional art piece in Richmond.

As his biggest installation yet, Burnaby artist Rober Brenninkmeyer has created a 12 feet tall by 16 feet wide wisteria tree, which now reside at Richmond’s Wisteria Place senior’s home.

The art piece is comprised of 126 panels of approximately 18,000 plastic bags, which took five months of planning and physical work to complete.

“It was exhilarating when I finished the piece and it was finally installed at Wisteria,” said Brenninkmeyer, who is also the founder and creative director of Plastic Essence Collaborative (PECO). “It was an absolute bunch of streams coming together as a whole and a conflict of emotions.

Brenninkmeyer told the Richmond News that each leaf represented a member of the community.

“It was like a mosaic coming together in a single tree. A community is only a community when you have a bunch of individuals come together,” he said.

“It even became a collaborative project because about 8,000 of the 18,000 plastic bags used in the project came from the residents themselves.”

The idea behind the wisteria tree came from Art Works, a commercial framing and art organization, which was curating artwork for Wisteria Place. The organization then commissioned Brenninkmeyer to create the work.

Deanna Geisheimer, Art Works president and director, said in a video documentary that the wisteria tree represents a “long life.” The theme of the work is about living a life “to be loved and in harmony.”

The piece will be displayed on a large wall near the building’s entrance.

Brenninkmeyer started his high school’s first recycling club in the late 1980s and while he spent several decades working in a branding industry, he said he had his “Jerry Macguire moment” where he became environmentally-conscious.

 “I’ve had this conscientiousness of participating (in the) for-profit economy, and not feeling all that good about this issue of making money at the cost of our environment. It just didn’t sit well,” said Brenninkmeyer.

“PECO exists to be a model for our ability to have a circular economy.”

PECO has been taking plastic, specifically polyethylene and polypropylene, and recycling them into three-dimensional art pieces, while raising awareness about the damage plastic has on the environment.

Brenninkmeyer said PECO has big goals for the future including more collaborative projects where people send in their own plastic and PECO will create an artwork using that plastic to emphasize that a person’s “trash can become something beautiful.”

PECO is also partnering with Ocean Legacy to work on turning ocean plastic, like old fishing nets, into larger-scaled art.

“It’s a step towards a circular economy and the key is to create an economy where everyone can make a living in balance with our environment.”

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Cornwall Hive's Art 4 All event hopes to grow – Standard Freeholder

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It might have been virtual, but the first ever Art 4 All still yielded some good results on Saturday.

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The event, organized by the Cornwall Art Hive, aimed at getting the local artistic community together to discuss the craft, create connections and of course, create. Initially, it was to be hosted at the Cornwall Square mall, but health and safety restrictions meant that it had to take place over Zoom.

Despite a smaller turnout that anticipated, Richard Salem, executive director of Your Arts Council of Cornwall and the SDG Counties (YAC), is hopeful that future Art 4 All events can be held in person.

“We felt that rather than not have anything that this would be better than nothing,” he said. “We are trying to keep the events as consistent as possible. We want to have one every month and hopefully by next month, the third Saturday, at Cornwall Square, we will have an event in person.”

In all, three local artists too part in the event — Salem, Yafa Goawily, and Liv Bigtree.

“Right now I have work showing at the Brooklyn collective which is a gallery space in North Carolina,” said Bigtree, 19. “Right now, I’m not really doing much, art-wise. I’ve been taking it easy, taking a little break.

“I like to do that when I’m not really working on big projects, I just come back to this space where I just have fun.”

  1. The Your Arts Council of Cornwall and SDG unveiled a new logo in collaboration with the Cornwall Art Hive at its general meeting on Tuesday, June 22, 2021 over Zoom. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    Your Arts Council struggled in pandemic, but excited for the year ahead

  2. The old Bank of Montreal building on Pitt Street on Friday July 6, 2018 in Cornwall, Ont. The building will soon become Cornwall's new arts centre.
Lois Ann Baker/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    YAC interested in running Cornwall’s arts centre

Goawily, which produces a wide range of visual arts, said creating art has always been relieving. She also explained that although the pandemic has created some issues for artists, it has had the effect of growing the local art movement.

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“We are growing not just with events and support, we are growing because we can reach different people – that is our main goal,” she said. “The community knows now that we are open for them.”

“Art is so important not just for artists but for everyone,” said Bigtree. “You don’t have to have specific skills. I really think that everyone is an artist. I think that it’s part of what makes us humans.

“Art is about freedom and that is what art hive is trying to create.”

Even with the pandemic, the Cornwall Art Hive and YAC still managed to host well-attended events in the summer, in Lamoureux Park. According to Salem, the happenings attracted residents from all walks of life and grew fast in popularity.

“Of course that it’s sad (pandemic restrictions), but I think that we learned to support each other more,” said Goawily. “I was new to Cornwall and did my first solo exhibition here. I find that yes, we are tiny but we are mighty. We are growing fast and we support each other truly.”

“We started buying art from each other and we had some groups going sharing what we had accomplished. We are stronger together.”

Anyone interested in gaining insight on the local art community can do so through a variety of videos uploaded to the Your Arts Council Youtube channel .

Fracine@postmedia.com

twitter.com/FrancisRacine

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The LA Art Show Returns With an Environmental Focus – Surface Magazine

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Environmental issues have taken on a particular urgency in the past year. Climate scientists have warned that if nations fail to immediately pivot from fossil fuels, catastrophic consequences await. Artists frequently reckon with this grim reality, with many expressing skepticism—if not outright anger—at climate inaction, which has resulted in the destruction of coral reefs, intense wildfires, rising sea levels, and the extinction of beloved animal species. The issues surrounding climate change have become top of mind for The LA Art Show, which is kicking off the city’s eagerly anticipated 2022 art season with a newfound ecological lens thanks to the return of DIVERSEartLA.

This year’s edition, which kicks off today at the Los Angeles Convention Center, sheds light not only on how artists represent the environment in their work, but how humanity’s role factors into the equation. “DIVERSEartLA 2022 will encourage visitors to confront the complex challenges of our global climate crisis and imagine potential solutions,” says Marisa Caichiolo, the show’s curator, who encouraged participating art museums to partner with science and environmental institutions. “This topic is at the heart of a growing number of art narratives, including exhibitions built with high-tech innovations designed to inspire artistic appreciation and the desire to respond to environmental challenges, reinforcing the value of translating environmental advocacy into art.” 

Among the programming highlights is “Our turn to change,” a worry-inducing video installation by Andrea Juan and Gabriel Penedo Diego and presented by the Museum of Nature of Cantabria Spain that awakens viewers to melting polar ice caps that are causing sea levels to rise drop by drop. The Torrance Art Museum, meanwhile, presents “Memorial to the Future,” a collaborative piece curated by Max Presneill that centers Brutalist architecture as a failed model of idealism while highlighting the immediate need for environmental action. And in “The Earth’s Fruits” by Guillermo Anselmo Vezzosi, waste unexpectedly takes on a dignified second life. 

The LA Art Show opens at the Los Angeles Convention Center, South Hall, from Jan. 19–23. 

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300-pound local art heist took 4 minutes | News | pentictonherald.ca – pentictonherald.ca

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300-pound local art heist took 4 minutes | News | pentictonherald.ca  pentictonherald.ca



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