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RSC Group: University of Ottawa Joined a Multi-National Team to Combat COVID-19 – Financial Post

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Russian supercomputer Employed to Develop COVID-19 Treatment

MOSCOW & OTTAWA, Ontario — The Bioanalytical and Molecular Interaction Laboratory lead by Professor Maxim Berezovski at the University of Ottawa has joined an international science group – from Russia, Finland and Italy – which got high priority access to Russian RSC Tornado supercomputer for studying methods to fight against the COVID-19 coronavirus infection.

The multi-national research team uses a recently upgraded cluster system based on 2nd Generation Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors, which has been deployed by RSC Group, the leading Russian solution provider for high-performance computing.

The international project aims to develop medicine for diagnostics and therapy against the coronavirus contagious disease that became the cause of the global pandemic. Finding treatments to prevent and mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 is the highest priority in the worldwide scientific community now. The international and multidisciplinary project takes advantages of the latest advances in experimental physics, chemistry, and biology to investigate the life cycle of the virus and to target specifically its specific proteins. Sophisticated simulation methods require supercomputing power to study all details of the interaction between the Spike-protein on coronavirus surface and the human protein ACE2 which is known to be the entry point for SARS and SARS-2 coronaviruses. It will help to complete all research stages within a limited amount of time.

“Rapid global spread of COVID-19 coronavirus infection pandemic has shown that there are no clear global emergency response plans against threats to humankind caused by new viruses. One of the obvious shortcomings is the lack of technologies for the quick development of medicines for diagnostics and therapy. We all have different competencies, knowledge, skills and resources. Our geographically distributed team includes virologists, biologists, chemists, mathematicians and physical scientists. The international cooperation is extremely important to achieve quick progress and rapidly react to the ever-changing situation with global coronavirus pandemic. We hope that our research will actually help to fight the spread of such infections,” explains Anna Kichkailo, Head of Laboratory for Digital Controlled Drugs and Theranostics at the Krasnoyarsk Federal Science Center of Russian Academy of Sciences.

The international team consists of:

  • Laboratory for Digital Controlled Drugs and Theranostics and Laboratory of Physics of Magnetic Phenomena, Kirensky Institute of Physics at the Federal Science Center, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (KIP FSC SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk, Russia),
  • Laboratory for Biomolecular and Medical Technology, V.F. Voyno-Yasenetsky Krasnoyarsk State Medical University (KSMU, Krasnoyarsk, Russia) – project coordinator,
  • Laboratory of Chemical Cybernetics, Department of Chemistry at Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU, Moscow, Russia),
  • Laboratory for Computer Simulation of Biomolecular Systems and Nanomaterials at N. M. Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IBCP RAS, Moscow, Russia),
  • Organic Synthesis Laboratory, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medical Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ICBFM SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia),
  • The Bioanalytical and Molecular Interaction Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa (Canada),
  • Nanoscience Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä (Finland),
  • Institute for Experimental Endocrinology and Oncology (IEOS), part of National Research Council (CNR), Naples (Italy),
  • Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, Federico II University of Naples (Italy).

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Contacts

Press:
Oleg Gorbachov
Corporate Communications Director, RSC Group
+7 (967) 052-50-85
oleg.gorbachov@rscgroup.ru

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Space telescopes capture asteroid strike – CTV News

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –

The world now has stunning new photos of this week’s asteroid strike, the first planetary defence test of its kind.

NASA on Thursday released pictures of the dramatic event taken by the Hubble and Webb space telescopes.

Telescopes on all seven continents also watched as NASA’s Dart spacecraft slammed Monday into the harmless space rock, 7 million miles (11 million kilometres) from Earth, in hopes of altering its orbit.

Scientists won’t know the precise change until November; the demo results are expected to instill confidence in using the technique against a killer asteroid headed our way one day.

“This is an unprecedented view of an unprecedented event,” Johns Hopkins University planetary astronomer and mission leader Andy Rivkin said in a statement.

All these pictures will help scientists learn more about the little asteroid Dimorphos, which took the punch and ended up with a sizable crater. The impact sent streams of rock and dirt hurling into space, appearing as bright emanating rays in the latest photos.

The brightness of this double asteroid system — the 525-foot (160-metre) Dimorphos is actually the moonlet around a bigger asteroid — tripled after the impact as seen in the Hubble images, according to NASA.

Hubble and Webb will keep observing Dimorphos and its large companion Didymos over the next several weeks.

The US$325 million Dart mission was launched last year. The spacecraft was built and managed by Johns Hopkins’ Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland.

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The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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3 Russian cosmonauts return safely from Intl Space Station – Lethbridge News Now

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By Canadian Press

Sep 29, 2022 | 1:32 PM

MOSCOW (AP) — Three Russian cosmonauts returned safely Thursday from a mission to the International Space Station.

The Soyuz MS-21 spacecraft carrying Oleg Artemyev, Denis Matveyev and Sergey Korsakov touched down softly at 4:57 p.m. at a designated site in the steppes of Kazakhstan, 150 kilometers (90 miles) southeast of the city of Zhezkazgan.

The trio had arrived at the space station in March. For Artemyev, the mission marked a third space flight, bringing his total time spent in orbit to 561 days. Matveyev and Korsakov each logged 195 days on their first missions.

As the Soyuz capsule was descending, using a big striped red-and-white parachute under clear skies, Artemyev reported to Mission Control that all members of the crew were feeling fine.

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Mary Vaux Walcott – The Canadian Encyclopedia

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Mary Vaux Walcott | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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