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S.Korea parliament committee votes to curb Google, Apple commission dominance – Reuters

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A 3D printed Google logo is placed on the Apple Macbook in this illustration taken April 12, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo

SEOUL, Aug 25 (Reuters) – A South Korean parliamentary committee voted on Wednesday to recommend amending a law, a key step toward banning Google and Apple from forcibly charging software developers commissions on in-app purchases, the first such curb by a major economy.

Apple Inc (AAPL.O) and Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google have faced global criticism because they require software developers using their app stores to use proprietary payment systems that charge commissions of up to 30%.

In a statement on Tuesday, Apple said the bill “will put users who purchase digital goods from other sources at risk of fraud, undermine their privacy protections”, hurt user trust in App Store purchases and lead to fewer opportunities for South Korean developers.

Wilson White, senior director of public policy at Google, said “the rushed process hasn’t allowed for enough analysis of the negative impact of this legislation on Korean consumers and app developers”.

Experts said app store operators could assure security in payment systems other than their own by working with developers and other companies.

“Google and Apple aren’t the only ones that can create a secure payment system,” said Lee Hwang, a Korea University School of Law professor specialising in competition law.

Others noted that South Korea had some of the most robust legal protections for online transactions in the world, and said app store operators should provide advanced services to bolster profits.

“Dominant app store operators with large platforms should by now look to profit from value-added services, not just taking a cut from apps sold on its store,” said Yoo Byung-joon, a Seoul National University School of Business professor who specialises in electronic commerce.

Based on South Korean parliament records, the amendment bans app store operators with dominant market positions from forcing payment systems on content providers and “inappropriately” delaying the review of, or deleting, mobile contents from app markets.

It also allows the South Korean government to require an app market operator to “prevent damage to users and protect the rights and interests of users”, probe app market operators, and mediate disputes regarding payment, cancellations or refunds in the app market.

After the vote from the legislation and judiciary committee to amend the Telecommunications Business Act, dubbed the “Anti-Google law,” the amendment will come to a final vote in parliament.

That vote was to come on Wednesday, but the session was provisionally delayed to Aug. 30, a parliament official told Reuters. read more

This month in the United States, a bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would rein in app stores of companies that they said exert too much market control, including Apple and Google. read more

Reporting by Heekyong Yang and Joyce Lee; Editing by Gerry Doyle and Kim Coghill

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Here’s how Apple has eliminated the plastic wrap from the iPhone 13 box – Times of India

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The iPhone 13 has finally been unveiled by Apple. The tech giant, in a move to reduce plastic usage, has removed the plastic wrap from the iPhone 13 boxes. Instead of plastic, the iPhone 13 box now comes with a paper tab along the length of the box, from the end to the bottom, secured in place with the help of adhesive. To open it, a tear-off strip has been provided. It was revealed in a tweet by Apple leaker DuanRui.

To check if the iPhone 13 unit you bought has not been taken out and or tampered with, you just need to take a look at the tear-off strip. If it is intact, without any tear, then you have the device in mint condition, straight from the assembly line. Unless you open the box, the lid won’t come off.
With this change in the box design, Apple claims that it will help avoid 600 metric tons of plastic. The company plans to go plastic-free on all its packaging from 2025.
Also, Apple claims that the new iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max use “100 per cent recycled rare earth elements in magnets like those used in MagSafe, 100 per cent recycled tin in the solder of the main logic board and, for the first time, in the solder of the battery management unit” to lessen their adverse impact on the environment. The company aims to go totally carbon neutral by 2030.

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Some Apple Card owners hit snags with iPhone 13 preorders – CNET

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Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiling the iPhone 13.


Screenshot by CNET

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple.

Some Apple Card users ran into problems when trying to pay for iPhone 13 preorders, which kicked off Friday morning.

Numerous people said on social media that they got error messages when they tried to use their Apple Card to pay for an iPhone 13 preorder. So much so, that it became a trending topic on Twitter. Some CNET staffers also reported problems. 

Apple acknowledged on its system status website that it had an “issue” with Apple Card that prevented some users from making purchases through Apple’s iPhone Upgrade Program. But it says the issue has since been resolved, and it advised users to try again. 

Some people reported that they had to use another method of payment to buy their phones. But if Apple Card owners do that, they miss out on the 3% cash back they’d normally receive when using the card to buy Apple products. Other purchases made with Apple Card reportedly went through.

Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for further comment. 

Apple unveiled its iPhone 13 lineup on Tuesday, alongside the Apple Watch Series 7 and new iPads. The new iPhones are available for preorder starting Friday and are expected to arrive in stores Sept. 24.

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The iPhone 13 batteries on average 13 percent larger than iPhone 12 series – MobileSyrup

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We now know how much bigger the iPhone 13 series’ batteries are compared to the iPhone 12 line.

The information comes courtesy of a product information sheet on the website of hazardous material information company Chemtrec (spotted by 9to5Mac). According to that document, which contains information sourced from Apple directly, the iPhone 13 batteries are on average 13 percent larger, with the 13 Pro Max now giving the Nintendo Switch a run for its wattage money.

The Chemtrec document lists the battery sizes in watt-hours (Wh) rather than milliamp-hours (mAh). The Verge notes that most manufacturers use mAh, but Wh is typically a more accurate measurement and better way to compare battery life.

You can view the battery breakdown below:

The Verge also pointed out a few interesting changes and listed the Wh battery measurement of some other popular devices.

Starting with the changes, the iPhone 13 and 13 Pro have different battery sizes, while the 12 and 12 Pro had the same size. Also of note is that the 13 Pro’s battery is smaller than the iPhone 13.

That may be because of the additional hardware in the iPhone 13 Pro — it’s got an extra camera, GPU core and a 120Hz display packed into the same size body as the iPhone 13. In other words, it makes sense that the 13 Pro has a slightly smaller battery.

As for how the iPhone 13 stacks up to other devices, here are the Wh measurements of some other popular devices (via iFixit):

Considering that Apple made the expanded battery capacity of the iPhone 13 line a significant selling point in its event, I’m glad the company also backed up the claims with numbers. Now, we just need to see if the claims hold up in real-world testing — something we should learn once reviewers start testing the phones.

Source: Chemtrec Via: The Verge, 9to5Mac

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