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Samsung Galaxy Note20 shown off from multiple angles in new video – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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The Samsung Galaxy Note20 arriving on August 5 has appeared in a new video shared by reliable leakster Evan Blass, which shows off the smartphone from multiple angles.

As you can see, the Galaxy Note20 sports a display with a punch hole in the center, and around the back are three cameras housed in a rectangular plate along with the flash module in the top-left corner.


Samsung Galaxy Note20

Samsung Galaxy Note20

Previously leaked CAD renders of the Galaxy Note20 had a fourth camera on the back, but given Blass’ excellent track record, it’s likely that we’ll see the regular Note20 sport triple rear cameras.

The clip also shows us the volume rocker and power button on the right side, and upon closer inspection, you can notice the S Pen stylus placed on the left side of the USB-C port at the bottom.

You can check out the tweet below to watch the entire clip.

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Madden 21 On Next-Gen Impressions: The Good, Underwhelming And The Bottom Line – Forbes

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The next-gen version of Madden 21 released a day early for PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X|S fans who already owned the game on current-gen consoles.

I’ve been playing the game since early on December 3, and one thing is pretty clear to me; it’s that this experience doesn’t warrant a full review because it’s not a brand new game.

I believe I’d be doing EA and fans a disservice by placing a score on what I consider more of a remastering than a new game.

That said, here’s the good, the bad and the bottom line.


The Good

Slight Visual Upgrade

If you’re looking for the kind of visual upgrade that gamers saw with NBA 2K21 and Spider-Man: Miles Morales, I’m sorry to disappoint you, but you won’t find that here. That said, there are some cutscenes between plays that will draw some admiration.

Haptic Feedback is Awesome

The best upgrade inthe next-gen version is in the PlayStation 5 controller. The haptic feedback comes through nicely on tackles and some of the ball-carrying situations. I adds a bit to the immersion and delivers an on-the-field quality.

Play-Calling Menu is an Adjustment, But a Long-Term Win

The new play-calling menu has more options than before, like finding plays for specific targets, and even making a favorites list. The UI is very different than what most Madden fans are used to, so there is some adjustment necessary.

Still, I see it as a change that will be positive in the long run.


The Underwhelming

I usually call this the bad section, but instead, I’m going with “the underwhelming.”

It’s not necessarily bad–at least not in every instance–and as I mentioned, this is more of a remaster than a full new release.

Players Feel More Weighted, But it Needs Balancing

Some users may like this, and I might ultimately join that group. However, at this point, the players mostly feel slow and sluggish with the exception of the most dynamic athletes like Tyreek Hill, Lamar Jackson and Christian McCaffrey.

I’m all for there being a differentiator in this vein, but at the moment, the defense seems to be at a major disadvantage in space against most any skill position player. In my experiences, this has led to a lot more big plays down the field caused by missed tackles.

The players definitely move more realistically than before, which was the major connection with Next-Gen Stats, but defensive players need a little bit of a buff to allow them to compete. I think this is fixable, or admittedly, it might be something I get used to over the next few weeks.

However, at this point, current-gen Madden is actually more fun to play. That’s probably a bit of death blow, but after further review, it’s how I’m feeling.

Weather Effects Aren’t a Thing

I was initially told weather would have no impact on gameplay.

Later, I was told the slipping and dropped passes from current-gen would still be in the game. I haven’t seen either as of yet, and quite honestly, I’m not sure they were ever quite as impacting as they should have been on PS4 or Xbox One.

While it is nice to see the footprints in the snow on parts of the field, this aspect of the presentation is the epitome of underwhelming.

No New Modes

I’ll keep this pretty short and plain: there are no new next-gen exclusive modes.

Lower-Quality Visuals in Some Instances

EA wanted to make sidelines more visibly appealing, and they accomplished their goal in some areas. However, there are some instances where the next-gen version becomes a visual downgrade. In some cutscenes, it appears the heads of linemen have simply been placed on the body of a wide receiver or defensive back.

The body types don’t match and this creates a very unfavorable looking model on the screen–especially considering this is a next-gen upgrade.

Next-Gen Stats is a Useless Gimmick at This Point

One of the biggest drivers for Madden 21 on next-gen was the use of Next-Gen Stats. A great usage of this tech would have been as an engine behind a new ratings system.

However, instead it’s more of a useless statistical overlay that really means nothing in the grand scheme of things. A number pops up on the screen during some pretty nice looking replays, but none of the speeds actually feel faster than the others, and it feels as though it’s all arbitrarily issued just for the sake of the graphic.

Hopefully EA builds this out into something with more meat on the bones in future versions of the game.


The Bottom Line

Madden 21 on next-gen was free to anyone who bought the game on PS4 or Xbox One X. Because of that, it’s hard to complain about it taking just a small bunny hop forward from the current-gen version.

That said, it’s impossible not to compare this to what 2K did with NBA 2K21. The difference is night and day. NBA 2K21 on next-gen still has some bugs to work out to reach its potential, but at least they tried to deliver a different experience.

At some point in the next couple of weeks, NBA 2K21 will have its act together, and it will have still delivered a true next-gen experience about eight months before Madden.

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Google AI researcher's exit sparks ethics, bias concerns – Tech Xplore

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Google AI researcher's exit sparks ethics, bias concerns
This Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, file photo shows Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Prominent artificial intelligence scholar Timnit Gebru helped improve Google’s public image as a company that elevates Black computer scientists and questions harmful uses of AI technology. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Prominent artificial intelligence scholar Timnit Gebru helped improve Google’s public image as a company that elevates Black computer scientists and questions harmful uses of AI technology.

But internally, Gebru, a leader in the field of AI ethics, was not shy about voicing doubts about those commitments—until she was pushed out of the this week in a dispute over a examining the societal dangers of an emerging branch of AI.

Gebru announced on Twitter she was fired. Google told employees she resigned. More than 1,200 Google employees have signed on to an open letter calling the incident “unprecedented research censorship” and faulting the company for racism and defensiveness.

The furor over Gebru’s abrupt departure is the latest incident raising questions about whether Google has strayed so far away from its original “Don’t Be Evil” motto that the company now routinely ousts employees who dare to challenge management. The exit of Gebru, who is Black, also raised further doubts about diversity and inclusion at a company where Black women account for just 1.6% of the workforce.

And it’s exposed concerns beyond Google about whether showy efforts at ethical AI—ranging from a White House executive order this week to ethics review teams set up throughout the tech industry—are of little use when their conclusions might threaten profits or national interests.

Gebru has been a star in the AI ethics world who spent her early tech career working on Apple products and got her doctorate studying computer vision at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

She’s co-founder of the group Black in AI, which promotes Black employment and leadership in the field. She’s known for a landmark 2018 study that found racial and in .

Gebru had recently been working on a paper examining the risks of developing computer systems that analyze huge databases of human language and use that to create their own human-like text. The paper, a copy of which was shown to The Associated Press, mentions Google’s own new technology, used in its search business, as well as those developed by others.

Besides flagging the potential dangers of bias, the paper also cited the environmental cost of chugging so much energy to run the models—an important issue at a company that brags about its commitment to being carbon neutral since 2007 as it strives to become even greener.

Google managers had concerns about omissions in the work and its timing, and wanted the names of Google employees taken off the study, but Gebru objected, according to an exchange of emails shared with the AP and first who co-authored the 2018 facial recognition study with Gebru.

“She deserves more than Google knew how to give, and now she is an all-star free agent who will continue to transform the ,” Buolamwini said in an email Friday.

How Google will handle its AI ethics initiative and the internal dissent sparked by Gebru’s exit is one of a number of problems facing the company heading into the new year.

At the same time she was on her way out, the National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday cast another spotlight on Google’s workplace. In a complaint, the NRLB accused the company of spying on employees during a 2019 effort to organize a union before the company fired two activist workers for engaging in activities allowed under U.S. law. Google has denied the allegations in the case, which is scheduled for an April hearing.

Google has also been cast as a profit-mongering bully by the U.S. Justice Department in an antitrust lawsuit alleging the company has been illegally abusing the power of its dominant search engine and other popular digital services to stifle competition. The company also denies any wrongdoing in that legal battle, which may drag on for years.


Explore further

Google hiring 10,000 workers in four cities by 2025


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iPhone 12's camera beats even the iPhone 11 Pro. Here's proof – CNET

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Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The iPhone 11 Pro packed one of the best cameras around, being able to take such great shots that it replaced my DSLR on a road trip around Scotland. Apple’s latest iPhone 12 may be one of the more affordable of the new lineup — which includes the smaller iPhone 12 Mini and the more premium 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max — but its camera is even more formidable.

I’ve taken the iPhone 12 for a spin around my home in Edinburgh, and I’ve been super impressed with how it stacks up against the previous 11 Pro. Sure, it doesn’t have the 2x telephoto lens, but the images it can capture with the standard view and the super-wide lens are superb. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

On this first scene in Dean Village, both cameras have captured an excellent overall exposure, but the iPhone 12’s shot has a richer blue sky and more contrast and detail on the buildings, resulting in a better-looking shot overall. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, super-wide lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, super-wide lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Switching to the super-wide view, both phones have been able to capture a huge amount of the scene in front of them, but again, the iPhone 12 has a bit more punch to the scene. Some of the buildings look a bit darker, however, which may not be to everyone’s tastes. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

While the overall exposure is great on both shots, the bright sky on the iPhone 11 Pro appears to have caused some haziness around where the buildings meet the sky. The iPhone 12’s shot has a clear distinction between the areas, which looks much nicer.

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Although the sky doesn’t cause the same haze in this scene, there’s a noticeable difference in the contrast between the two images. The iPhone 12’s shot has richer colors, which helps add some punch to the shadows on the church, as well as help distinguish the various trees from each other further down. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

In this example, however, I can see almost no discernible differences between the two images. Both are pin-sharp with accurate colors and great contrast. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Up on Edinburgh’s Calton Hill, I prefer the look of the shot from the iPhone 11 Pro. It has a warmer white balance to it (which may only be caused by the tiny shift in shooting angle) that I think gives a more pleasing tone to the scene and has allowed it to maintain some of the sunset colors in the sky. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Looking at the increasing sunset from another direction, both phones have captured the tones and the exposure extremely well. The iPhone 12’s shot does have more contrast and clarity on the buildings further in the scene, as well as making them a touch brighter, which I think makes for a superior image. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

As the sunset deepened, the phones had to fight harder to keep that bright streak of orange in the sky under control, while still capturing plenty of detail in the foreground. They’re both great shots, but the iPhone 12’s image again shows brighter details in the building and foreground foliage. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens, Night mode


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens, Night mode


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

As night began to fall I headed further into the city and found this scene. The 11 Pro has captured a great image overall, but it’s clear to see that the iPhone 12’s is brighter, with more detail on the cobblestones and on “The Arches” sign. 

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iPhone 11 Pro, super-wide lens, Night mode


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, super-wide lens, Night mode


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The situation is much the same with these beautiful Christmas decorations, shot using the super-wide lens and the Night mode. The iPhone 12 Pro’s shot is brighter, with much more visible detail to be seen. 

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Detail crop, iPhone 11 Pro


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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Detail crop, iPhone 12


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Cropping in to the top of the building on that same super-wide shot, it’s clear to see that the iPhone 12’s image is both brighter and sharper.

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iPhone 11 Pro, standard lens, Night mode


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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iPhone 12, standard lens, Night mode


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Taken using Night mode at 10 seconds, both shots have captured an impressive amount of detail in what was such an incredibly dark nighttime scene. The iPhone 12’s shot is a touch brighter, however.

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Crop detail, iPhone 11 Pro


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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Crop detail, iPhone 12


Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Cropping in on the corner of the same images, it’s possible to see that the iPhone 12 has been able to capture significantly better detail in the edges of its frame when using Night mode.

The iPhone 12 takes better photos

In almost every example in this test I prefer the look of the images from the iPhone 12 over those taken on the iPhone 11 Pro. Details are clearer, shots are brighter and more vibrant, and Night mode images have seen huge improvements. It’s not such a significant upgrade that it’s worth moving from an iPhone 11 Pro to the iPhone 12, but the 12 is the phone to go for if you’re looking at upgrading from an earlier handset. 

The only downside to keep in mind is that the iPhone 12 doesn’t have the 2x telephoto lens. As a photographer, I love using the zoom on the phone as it allows me to get some really interesting angles on subjects that you can’t do with a wide-angle lens. If you’re a really dedicated photographer then it’s worth considering spending the extra and going for the iPhone 12 Pro or 12 Pro Max, both of which offer the telephoto lens as well as the standard and super-wide views.

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